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Posts Tagged ‘OK!’

Us‘s Janie Min: “I don’t think magazines are in my future.”

us_weekly_min2.jpgYesterday, we learned that celebrity editor-in-chief Janice Min was stepping down from the top slot at Us Weekly. The question on everyone’s mind is: what’s next for Min?

WWD scored an interview with Min and, although they couldn’t get her to give a hint about whether she has a new gig lined up, the editor did admit she doesn’t think she’ll be staying in magazines.

“I don’t think magazines are in my future,” Min told WWD. “I would be surprised if I worked for another magazine. Us Weekly is the ultimate magazine experience. And I now have the freedom to talk to people and figure out what I’ll do next.”

WWD also has some ideas about who might be in line to replace Min, if Michael Steele, who will step into her role for the time being, takes the editor-in-chief role on only temporarily. Some names mentioned include Us‘s Los Angeles bureau chief Melanie Bromley and the magazine’s news director Lara Cohen, rival pub Life & Style‘s editor-in-chief Dan Wakeford and In Touch eic Richard Spencer; People magazine’s Peter Castro, former editor-in-chief of British OK! Nicola McCarthy and ex-Min staffer Colleen Curtis.

Al Franken Wins! (Again)|Ex-FoxNew.com Columnist Sues News Corp.|There May Be Jobs In Atlanta|OK! Paid $500K For MJ Photo

FishbowlLA: The Minnesota Supreme Court certifed Al Franken as the Senate winner after close to a year of fights put up by Republican rival Norm Coleman. Finally!

TVNewser: FoxNews.com entertainment columnist Roger Friedman has sued his former employer for wrongful termination.

MediaJobsDaily: A new tool created by WANTED Technologies shows that reporters should move to Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles or New York in order to find work. Well, we all know how crappy the job market is here, so maybe you’ll have more luck in one of those other cities.

Mediaweek: Sources say that OK! magazine paid $500,000 for the picture of Michael Jackson en route to the hospital it ran on its cover.

Journalist And Author Alyssa Katz Talks Real Estate On The Menu

mmm_2-3.gifToday on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu, hosts Jason Boog of GalleyCat and AgencySpy’s Matt Van Hoven welcome Alyssa Katz, freelance journalist and author of the new book “Our Lot: How Real Estate Came to Own Us.”

Her book talks about the housing bubble and the mortgage mess, but today she talked about how many main stream journalists missed the building drama. “No one else at the time was connecting these mass foreclosures in Ohio to this booming market in mortgage securities on Wall Street,” she said.

Now the places in the country that are doing the worst — still — are inland California, Florida and the Cleveland area, Katz said. “I think we have to look very closely about what’s happening in Washington and what isn’t happening there,” she said. “Right now why some areas are being hit so hard is that we’re in a zero sum scheme. Basically its the lenders and the financial institutions that finance them and the lenders on the other side. And anything that is done without direct government money to help homeowners means that the banks lose. And as you know our banking system is in very precarious.”

Also discussed: author Alice Hoffman‘s dispute with a book reviewer on Twitter (a follow-up from yesterday’s discussion) and OK! magazine paying $500,000 for Michael Jackson‘s last photos.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

TV Networks Rely On White Supremacist “Expert”|Daily News Cans Columnist|OK! Losing Major Money|Popular Science Augments Reality On Cover|Should Time Warner Dump Time Inc.?

Visit msnbc.com for Breaking News, World News, and News about the Economy

TVNewser: As part of their coverage of the Holocaust Museum shooting, television networks and other news organizations have turned to a well-documented white supremacist as an “expert.”

Gawker: The New York Daily News has laid off Sean Evans, one half of the Gatecrasher gossip column team. Will the Daily News try to lure back Spencer Morgan, who was recently among those fired from The Observer?

Media Ink: OK! in even more trouble? The stateside version of the U.K. gossip rag $23.4 million last year and “it’s estimated the magazine’s losses will reach close to $130 million by the time it reaches its four-year anniversary in August.”

New York Times: Popular Science tries out augemented reality on its cover, with an ad for General Electric.

BusinessWeek: After spinning off AOL, is it time for Time Warner to dump Time Inc.?

The OK! Shakeup

ok!.pngYesterday, a post came into our inbox from Aaron Gell of ASSME.org suggesting a conspiracy afoot at OK! magazine. Turns out, the British mag spin-off, which has been blowing through editors recently, is planning an upscale revamp that would make the magazine more like Elle. Gell surmised the reorganization was the result of an “evil pact” between OK!‘s publisher Lori Burgess and Jason Oliver Nixon, an editorial consultant. Both once worked at Niche Media and, according to her LinkedIn profile, Burgess is working with Nixon at the luxury consulting company he founded, LXJ360.

Hours later, Gell and others reported that OK! editor-in-chief Katie Caperton (named to the position just two months ago) had been fired, along with some other staff members. Is this all part of Burgess’s rebranding efforts or some personal vendetta against Caperton and her loyal staffers?

We’ve put out requests for information to OK!‘s publicist and Caperton, but if you have any tips or info about who got canned yesterday and why, please put it in the anonymous tip box at the right or email us.

Update: OK!‘s publicist Brian Strong sent us a statement confirming Caperton’s exit, “effective today.” Although no replacement has been named, “there is an executive editorial team managing OK!‘s new initiatives and goals,” he said. However, he hasn’t yet elaborated on what those “initiatives and goals” are exactly. (If we hear from him, we’ll let you know)

Second Update: Strong says celebrity news will remain “at the core of the brand,” and the staff will be working on “developing and integrating important enhancements that reflect a heightened focus on style.”

More of Brian’s statement, and a list of some new hires at OK! after the jump.

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Brian Williams Gets Indie Music Cred|Google’s Mysterious Meetings With Post And Times|Newspapers Should Fail|OK!‘s Luxury Update Conspiracy|WSJ.com’s Micro-Payment Plan

WebNewser: Today, Brian Williams launched BriTunes, an indie music web series. Sadly, Williams doesn’t sing.

MediaMemo: Google is meeting with The Washington Post and The New York Times, too. But what are they talking about?

Silicon Alley Insider: Newspapers should be allowed to fail.

ASSME: Is OK!‘s luxe rebranding a product of “an evil pact between publisher Lori Burgess and editorial consultant Jason Oliver Nixon“?

Reuters: WSJ.com plans to institute “micro-payments” for articles and premium subscriptions.

Ad Pages Plummet 25.9 Percent

down04.15.09.jpgBut hey, revenues for consumer magazines only dropped 20.2 percent!

According to the Publishers Information Bureau, ad pages during the first quarter of 2009 totaled 37,196.43, down 25.9 percent from just a year before. Those ads took in $4,183,426,592 in revenue, declining little more than 20 percent.

Each of the top 12 categories, which make up more than 85 of total revenue, fell.

There were a few winners, including Muscle + Fitness — which jumped 19.1 percent — and OK!, which gained 22.4 percent.

Hearst announced plans to bump up its closing date for ads, starting with Cosmopolitan. Jeff Hamill, a senior VP, said the magazine would begin accepting advertisements up to five weeks before the book’s on-sale date and would soon shorten that to three weeks.

People Disappears from Wal-Mart in Distribution Stand-Off

people-magazine.jpgOne has to wonder at the logic of a magazine distribution standoff in the midst of a financial crisis that’s threatening to sink the industry. Nonetheless (as threatened) Time Inc., American Media, and Bauer have pulled their magazines from Wal-Mart, the single biggest magazine retailer in the country, over a dispute with wholesalers Anderson News and Source Interlink Cos, who (as threatened) have imposed a seven cent surcharge on every copy delivered.

This means until the dispute is settled Wal-Mart will be without copies of People, Sports Illustrated, Time, In Touch, Life & Style, Star, and National Enquirer. Time Inc. says they have pulled together their own network of wholesalers, which is great but doesn’t solve the problem of Wal-Mart who says it is standing behind Source Interlink and Anderson.

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Sundown on Sunset: Initial Acts of Violence

SantaMonicaPier.jpg

NYU’s Jay Rosen slaps Michael Skube around in the LAT.

JT LeRoy has a maid and Jeff Bercovici throws a punch at the NYT.

WoW reports on David Hasselhoff’s shake down of OK!.

TMZ gets another tongue lashing from Tabloid Baby.

CIA, COS, ZOG, FEMA, HIV–one of these is not like the others, as STC stomps on conspiracy theories.

(photo by Amy Alkon)

The Toll “Real News” Takes

feverchart.jpgThe folks at Us Weekly, OK!, Star and E! must be taking some long lunch breaks this week. Whenever “real” news strikes (read: tragedy that happens in the U.S. — that Iraq stuff is so played out), the appetite for celebrity dish tends to go way, way down. How far down?

Thirty-three percent down.

According to our unscientific study tracking the number of posts on TMZ.com, we discovered that tragedy accounts for a 32.9 percent decrease in posts this week over the same time period the week before.

But for those who worry that this new sobriety will last, that our way of life will forever be altered, take comfort. All is not lost — just 33 percent of it is.

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