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Posts Tagged ‘Olympic Games’

Morning Media Newsfeed: NBC Secures Olympics | AOL Earnings Fall Flat | Horowitz to Today

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NBC Secures Olympics Through 2032 (TVSpy)
NBCUniversal has acquired the rights to the Olympic Games through 2032. The new deal, valued at $7.65 billion, is the longest U.S. Olympic sports rights agreement in history. TVNewser NBC adds to the three Olympics it secured in an earlier deal: 2016 in Rio, 2018 in Pyeongchang and 2020 in Tokyo, with six more Summer and Winter Olympics through 2032, the host cities of which have not yet been selected. Adweek The deal comes as a major surprise on the week before the broadcast upfront presentations, as rival media outlets appeared to have been altogether unaware that negotiations were in the works. In fact, several sources confirmed that no other networks were so much as invited to bid for the package. This was by design, said IOC president Thomas Bach. Reuters The IOC did not approach ESPN, a network spokesman said, and neither were Fox nor CBS. The agreement includes media rights across broadcast television, cable TV, Internet and mobile platforms. NBC and rival networks have been stocking up on live sports content, which are popular with advertisers because large audiences watch in real-time and do not skip the TV commercials. Mashable NBC has become a player in the live sports industry in recent years, signing deals for the U.S. rights to the English Premier League, the National Hockey League and Sunday night NFL games. The Olympics are an expensive property, but NBC claims that it has been able to turn a profit on them. The price tag for the most recent deal is $1.4 billion more than the previous one.

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WNBC Sends Bruce Beck and Katy Tur to London Olympics

Let the Games begin!

Channel 4, the New York home of NBC’s extensive Olympic coverage, is enhancing the Games by sending two reporters to London.

Sports anchor Bruce Beck and reporter Katy Tur will provide updates and features for WNBC newscasts. Their reports will be seen each day of the fortnight starting Thursday and air on Today in New York, along with broadcasts at 5 p.m. and 11 p.m. The noon will be pre-empted by the Olympics.

In addition, David Ushery, who hosts The Debrief, anchors a nightly show from Studio 3C, The Olympics Zone. The 30-minute-program runs at 7:30 Monday through Saturday nights during the Games. The program will feature local Olympian profiles and interviews from London, competition recaps, and other stories of interest to viewers.

“We are proud to offer our viewers local coverage of the London 2012 Olympic Games,” said Michael Jack, president and general manager of NBC 4 New York. “With live reporting from our talent in London, to special programming such as The Olympic Zone, and extensive social media outreach, we will keep our viewers updated on the latest and most exciting Olympic news.”

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How the U.S. Media Will Be Covering Beijing ’08

OTR2_0.jpgSo the big question ahead of the start of the Olympic Games this Friday is less who will take home all the medals than how will the Chinese deal with the media should anything “newsworthy” arise (read: protests, etc.). Thus far things are not looking so promising: On top of reports that China continues to censor Internet access, comes this week’s story that Chinese police had beaten and jailed two Japanese reporters for attempting to report on this week’s attack in the Xinjiang region (not to mention the arrest of two Americans and two Brits for unfurling a banner protesting Tibet).

To this end the Observer is reporting that there has been much talk inside the wall of both NBC — the sole American network covering the Games — and the NYT as to how they will deal with breaking news. NBC head Dick Ebersol has made it clear that NBC is there to cover sports first, however “in the major venues, we have our own cameras. So if something develops during the opening ceremony…we also have both news and sports people ready to comment on that.” For the NYT however it’s about “so much more than sports.” One of the biggest challenges, apart from negotiating the endless Chinese bureaucracy that has a tendency to change rules at the last point, will be how to cover the restrictions on coverage:

This is a particular problem for the rights holders. The ethical questions about working with the Chinese are complicated by a philosophical dimension: China is repressive toward journalists, and it is open-handed toward commerce. So which proposition is the truth about freedom in China? And which side are you on?
President Bush, may himself be setting a certain tone for future coverage. The President, who is traveling in the region on his way to Beijing has apparently decided to speak out again Chinese policy during a speech he will be giving tomorrow in South Korea. Let the Games begin, as they say.