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Posts Tagged ‘online journalism’

7 Tips for Responding to Negative Social Media Feedback

Social media can be a boon and a bane to companies and consumers alike. It’s undoubtedly true that brands and consumers can have a constructive dialogue on Twitter and Facebook. Case in point: A WSJ subscriber misses an issue and tweets his displeasure to head honcho Rupert Murdoch himself. Not only did he get a reply, but some quality customer service as well!

Unfortunately, trolls abound in the online world and can drown out those offering constructive criticism. How can you tell the haters from those that are worth responding to? And how can you manage your time when it comes to responding to criticism? In the latest Mediabistro feature, social media experts weigh in on how to handle negative feedback in a way that’s best for you and your audience.

One big piece of advice: don’t just delete.

“How you handle a negative comment says much more about you than the comment itself,” said Shama Kabani, CEO of The Marketing Zen Group. “Removing a comment can lead to others accusing you of censorship and, at worst, can lead to a PR disaster.”

For more, read 7 Tips for Responding to Negative Social Media Feedback. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

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Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

90 Percent of AskMen.com is Freelance-Written

AskMen.com, which focuses on giving guys actionable advice on career, health, dating and more, is in the market for freelancers with expertise. So, if you can show off personal finance savvy or dieting know-how to the editors, you could be landing assignments in no time.

“Our typical user is a guy in his late 20s, who is well out of college and may be getting his footing in his career, but is very much in an evolution phase in his life,” said editor-in-chief James Bassil. “He’s open to improvement, honest with himself about what he wants to do and is open to change. In presenting content, we want to egg readers on and motivate them to get through those changes, but also give them the tools to do so by providing a tangible, concrete thing that he needs to do right there. Takeaway value is huge. We want to give readers something they can put into use right away.”

Got a great idea for the site? Find more pitching guidelines and editors’ contact info in How To Pitch: AskMen.com. [subscription required]

The Future Of Multiplatform Journalism: Giving Readers What They Want

reuters panel.pngAfter wrapping up two days of the Personal Democracy Forum yesterday, we ran over to a panel hosted by Reuters and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers discussing the future of journalism in a multimedia world.

Moderated by Reuters’ global managing editor Betty Wong, the panel included New York Times business and financial editor Lawrence Ingrassia, a very pregnant Financial Times U.S. managing editor Chrystia Freeland, Columbia Journalism School dean Sree Sreenivasan and mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby.

Wong opened up the conversation by asking the panelists how media companies can make the best of all their resources, in order to take advantage of the many different platforms available.

“We all have to ask ourselves, ‘What do our readers really want?’” Freeland said. She added that journalists are entrepreneurial at heart and want to create a brand and a Web presence for themselves, but it’s up to the editors and management to decide what’s best for the news organization. “The turning point came when journalists realized that it is in their personal interest to have a Web presence,” she said. “Journalists became journalists to become famous and make a name for themselves.”

Photo: Thomson Reuters Markets CEO Devin Wenig (right) introduces the panel featuring (from left) Touby, Sreenivasan, Freeland and Ingrassia

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