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Posts Tagged ‘Osama Bin Laden’

Seth Meyers Has a Newfound Appreciation for Pockets

NPRFreshAirLogoThe Web headline for today’s NPR Fresh Air interview with Seth Meyers is a good example of click-baiting with integrity. Because listening to the conversation titled “Seth Meyers’ Late Night Challenge: What To Do With His Hands?” does indeed address and answer one of the first bits of self-conscious business for the incoming talk show host:

“The trickiest part of this job the first week was just figuring out what to do with my hands. I think one of the great discoveries I made at the show was the memory of pockets. I was like, ‘OK, I can put one of these away.’”

“I as a person in conversation tend to use my hands a great deal and I think my first couple of monologues I looked like someone on a desert island trying to signal for a passing plane.”

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Personal Essay Writing: Master Class

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Seymour Hersh Unloads on New York Times, Other Topics

SeymourHershNewYorkerPicGuardian media and tech journalist Lisa O’Carroll had a rip roaring conversation with famed investigative journalist and author Seymour Hersh. Translation: various MSM outlets will be putting extra emphasis today on TGIF:

Don’t even get him started on the New York Times which, he says, spends “so much more time carrying water for Obama than I ever thought they would” – or the death of Osama bin Laden. “Nothing’s been done about that story, it’s one big lie, not one word of it is true,” he says of the dramatic US Navy Seals raid in 2011.

That last part sounds like a battle cry. If there is zero truth to the Zero Dark Thirty narrative, a great story is waiting there for an intrepid and well-funded journo(s).

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Esquire Supports SEAL Team 6 Piece

There’s a bit of a dustup happening regarding Esquire’s “The Shooter” piece, about the SEAL Team 6 member who shot Osama bin Laden. CNN quoted a SEAL as saying that the details given by the Shooter were “complete BS” and that he is not the man who shot Bin Laden. CNN’s SEAL claims that the “point man” in the raid on Bin Laden’s compound was the real shooter and that there were no guns within Bin Laden’s reach, as Esquire’s Shooter claimed.

While the details of CNN’s SEAL’s account match up more with those laid out in No Easy Day, written by another SEAL on the mission, Esquire’s editor-in-chief David Granger writes that he and the magazine stand by the Shooter’s account:

Yesterday, CNN issued a report that attempted to cast doubt on The Shooter’s account of the mission and on whether he was the man who was responsible for killing Osama bin Laden. To be clear: Esquire and Phil Bronstein, the veteran journalist and writer of the story, object to CNN’s report in the strongest possible terms. By stark contrast with Bronstein’s thoroughgoing 15,000 word report, the CNN story constitutes a mere act of assertion. As far as can be gleaned from the report, it is based on the opinion of one current SEAL who was not on the bin Laden mission and who therefore could not have first-hand knowledge of it. It is little more than gossip. Esquire’s story remains the most thoroughly reported account of the raid and of the death of Osama bin Laden.

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Esquire Gets Interview with Navy SEAL Who Shot Osama Bin Laden

Esquire has quite a scoop in its March issue. Inside the issue Esquire has published the first interview with the Navy SEAL responsible for killing Osama Bin Laden. Not just one of the SEALs on the mission; the SEAL who shot the most infamous terrorist in the world. In fact, he’s referred to only as “The Shooter” in the piece by Phil Bronstein.

Aside from getting the SEAL to give his account of what happened that day, the most interesting aspect about this piece is that Bronstein gets him to open up about what has happened after that day. Not much, it seems, has gone well.

The Shooter explained to Bronstein that now that he has retired, he has been left with no pension, no medical insurance for his family, no assistance transitioning to civilian life and about a nine month wait to gain access to medical benefits for himself.

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Osama Bin Laden: Magazine Magnate

This morning the government released a trove of documents that were found at Osama bin Laden’s compound after he was killed, and among them were letters in which Bin Laden gave advice on how magazines should operate. As you might have guessed, Bin Laden would’ve been quite the stickler with his editors.

A few of his ideas:

It is important for you to focus a portion of your interest on the Mujahidin (This means “Those doing jihad,” or “strugglers”) publications; provide them with advice and guidance to avoid the mistakes that would impact either the reputation of the Mujahidin and the sympathy of the nation’s masses or that would impact the mind and the character of the youths — who rely mainly in their culture on the publications issued by the Mujahidin and their partisans.

A sound recommendation. Content should be less “We just killed a whole bunch of innocent people” and more “17 stylish ways to wear explosives.”

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Casey Anthony Trial the Most Searched News Story of 2011

Casey Anthony Trial” was the most searched news story of the year, according to a study released by Bing. Following behind Casey Anthony was Osama bin Laden Death, Hurricane Irene, Japan Earthquake/Tsunami and Amy Winehouse Death, respectively. Bing, a search engine used by those who have gone temporarily insane and thus forgot about Google, added up all of the website’s searches for the results.

Some other interesting finds: The Kardashian sisters all made the top five for most searched “reality star,” the “Today” show was the most searched morning program and Justin Bieber was the most searched person of the year.

The Biebs was also the most searched musician, meaning “Bieber for President in 2029″ is going to happen. And no, it won’t matter that he’s not a citizen, the man is unstoppable.

Afghan Journalist Discovers Los Angeles

Afghan journalist Emal Haidary came to Los Angeles on a five-month journalism fellowship, sponsored by the the Daniel Pearl Foundation. He worked at the LA Times from April through August and just penned a lengthy Column One piece about his experiences in America. The whole piece is worth the read, including Haidary’s experience of being here when Osama bin Laden was killed, and his impressions of constantly being mistaken for being Latino. But we found this section the most interesting.

Isn’t America supposed to be the richest nation in this world? Then who are these homeless people on the streets? In Los Angeles, you can’t walk down the street without being approached by people who beg you for your spare change.

But in L.A. I also found the freedom that America is famous for. You can grow a long beard, or you have fake breasts; you can be as skinny as a stick of macaroni but still go out jogging, or you can sit in front of the TV all day long and be as round as a barrel — either way, you are fine, it is Los Angeles.
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Newspapers Gain A Larger Share of Internet Audience

Newspapers are increasingly staking their claim to the Internet and its emerging advertising bounty. According to a recent comScore study for the Newspaper Association of America, newspapers attracted an average monthly audience of 110.8 million unique visitors over the age of 18 to their websites in the second quarter–that’s 64.6 percent of all adult Internet users. That number is up two percent over last quarter.

Even better news, online advertising generated $807 million in revenue for newspapers in the first quarter, up 10.6 percent.

“Smartphones and tablets are increasing mobility and ease-of-access to newspaper websites, and these latest figures reflect the innovative and successful steps that newspaper publishers are taking to optimize their content across platforms,” NAA President and CEO John Sturm said of the study on his organization’s website. “The credibility associated with newspapers and strong newspaper brands clearly carries over to the online environment — distinguishing newspaper sites from other sources. When dramatic global events unfold, such as the death of Osama bin Laden, readers look to newspapers first, online and in print, for the high-quality journalism that they provide.”

Best New York Post Puns: Bin Laden or Strauss-Kahn?

Likely genius Juli Weiner at Vanity Fair is taking on the tough question of whether alleged rapist Dominque Strauss-Kahn or departed terrorist Osama bin Laden has inspired the New York Post to greater heights in headline puns.

Check out her whole collection of Post covers here. But some highlights, first. On Straus-Kahn: “Frog Legs It” and “Booty Gaul” were some of our favorites. On bin Laden, who could forget the porn stash discovery headlined by “Osama Bin Wankin’!”?

So how to choose? If you’re torn, according to Weiner, at least you can surmise this much: “What it all proves is that it’s still surprisingly hard to determine which group the Post hates more: the terrorists or the French.”

White House Stops Staging Pictures of Live Speeches for News Photographers

Since Ronald Reagan, the White House has had a policy that still photography cannot be taken during a live presidential address, like the one President Obama gave announcing Osama bin Laden‘s death.

The reason still cameras are not allowed is simply because of the noise from the camera shutters and the placement of the teleprompter. But this policy results in the president having to re-enact part of his address so photographers can take pictures. After Obama’s speech on bin Laden, for example, once the president had finished addressing the nation, he “then re-enacted the walk-out and first 30 seconds of the statement for us,” explained Reuters photographer Jason Reed.

Apart from just being an odd thing to do, this re-enactment goes against the National Press Photographers Association Code of Ethics, which says: “Resist being manipulated by staged photo opportunities.”

Even though this policy has been going on for decades, since Obama’s speech, it has blown up into a huge story, and not just on journalism blogs — we’ve even seen it covered on cable news channels. Perhaps the unexpected public outcry is because, as Poynter found in a survey,  30 of 50 newspaper front pages that used an Obama photo from the speech “implied or strongly suggested it was an image of the live address.”

But really, we think it had more to do with the fact that headlines on this story allowed for the serendipitous combination of the words “Bin Laden,” “Photo,” “Obama,” and “Staged.”

In any event, the White House caved into the demands of the angry public, and now has ended its practice of re-enacting presidential speeches, the Washington Post reports.

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