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Posts Tagged ‘Parade’

Layoffs Coming to Parade

Now that Parade has been purchased by Atlhon Media, the bad news comes — about 85 staffers are likely to get cut. The New York Post reports that the layoffs will come as Athlon moves operations to its headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee.

Only about 20 Parade staffers are expected to be offered jobs. The glossy’s editor Maggie Murphy and CEO Jack Haire will not be among them.

“I was honored to have had this job,” Murphy, who had been with Parade since 2010, told the Post. “I just want people to know I have an amazing staff here.”

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Parade to be Sold to Athlon Media

Parade, the magazine that has filled Sunday newspapers for many years, is about to be sold to Athlon Media. The New York Post reports that Athlon — which is known for publishing sports annuals — is in the late stages of talks with Parade’s parent, Advance Publications.

Aside from sports guides, Athlon publishes monthly glossies Spry Living, Relish, and the number three Sunday insert — American Profile. Parade is number one, with a circulation of 32 million, and USA Weekend is number two.

Despite the hefty numbers, Parade has been struggling lately — ad pages through September are down nine percent compared to last year.

If the deal goes through, Parade would benefit from being sold to a company headed by a billionaire. Athlon’s CEO Spencer Hays founded Tom James, one of the nation’s largest custom suit makers, and owns a variety of other successful businesses.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Dish, Scripps Make Online TV Deal | Sponsors Back Away from NFL

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Dish Gets Scripps Networks Rights for Online Video Service (THR)
Pay TV company Dish Network and Scripps Networks Interactive on Tuesday announced a multi-year carriage renewal for the latter’s lifestyle cable TV networks. Deadline Hollywood HGTV, Food Network and Great American Country are among the Scripps Networks Interactive channels that will be part of the package that Dish Network is assembling for its planned broadband video service that will target young viewers who want a low-cost alternative to the full pay TV bundle that many consider to be too expensive. Re/code The service is supposed to launch this year. Like pacts Dish has previously made with Disney and A&E, the agreement is part of a larger distribution deal for the satellite TV company. Last week, Sony announced that it had made progress on its own Web TV plans by signing up Viacom. Variety In addition to the over-the-top streaming rights, the pact expands Dish’s distribution of authenticated live and VOD programming on Internet-connected devices and widens distribution of DIY and Cooking Channel to Dish’s America’s Top 200 satellite TV package. The OTT rights under the deal with Scripps Networks let Dish deliver multiple streams per household. “This first-of-its-kind OTT deal for Scripps Networks Interactive enables us to reach even more people through Dish’s innovative services,” said Ken Lowe, Scripps Networks Interactive president and CEO. New York Post Dish chairman Charlie Ergen was on the East Coast last week wooing programmers to the new platform, sources said. Dish is one of the first companies to risk cannibalizing its existing pay-TV product to be a first mover in burgeoning Internet-based TV space.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Media Cover Cantor Loss | RTDNA Announces Winners

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Right-Wing Radio’s Win on Cantor (Politico)
Dave Brat didn’t have much money, staff or name recognition — but he did have Laura Ingraham. In the weeks leading up to Tuesday’s primary, the conservative talk radio host did more to raise Brat’s profile in his Virginia district than his own campaign could ever have done with its paltry budget and paid staff of two, political experts in the state and Washington said Wednesday. TVNewser Cable news networks went into overdrive with the stunning news Tuesday night. At 8:06 p.m. MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow interrupted Chris Hayes‘ show, which had been pre-recorded. Maddow called it “a shocking development in American politics.” (Hayes returned live at 8:38 p.m.). CNN’s Anderson Cooper called the race at 8:11 p.m. and FNC’s Trace Gallagher broke into The O’Reilly Factor at 8:14 p.m. ET, before Bret Baier and Megyn Kelly picked up coverage and filled out the 8 p.m. ET hour. NYT Few people did more than Ingraham to propel Brat, a 49-year-old economics professor who has never held elected office before, from obscurity to national conservative hero, defeating house majority leader Eric Cantor in the Republican primary held Tuesday night. And few stories better illustrate how his out-of-nowhere victory was due in large part to a unique and potent alignment of influential voices in conservative media. New York Daily News / Mouth of The Potomac Ingraham likened a rally she held for Brat to what she saw in 2008 when freshman senator Barack Obama was campaigning in the Iowa caucuses. She left Iowa knowing Obama would win. “The national media totally missed this,” said Ingraham, a nervy and entertaining conservative, noting how little coverage the rally got, mostly via the local NBC station and a conservative website. TVNewser Nearly 4 million people tuned into one of the cable news networks during the 8 p.m. ET hour Tuesday night as news broke that Cantor had been defeated in his Virginia primary race. As usual, Fox News led the way in both ratings metrics, averaging 2,794,000 total viewers and 485,000 adult 25-54 viewers in the 8 p.m. hour.

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Parade Rumored to be Up for Sale

Parade, the magazine that for many is forever linked to Sunday newspapers, is rumored to be on the block. The New York Post cites “reliable industry sources” that say the 73-year-old glossy is being shopped by its parent, Advance Publications.

Parade can still be found in more than 700 Sunday newspapers each week, but like other magazines, it is struggling to compete in the digital-first world. Ad pages have suffered, dropping 10 percent through June. Products — like React, a teen-focused entry from Parade — have faltered.

Despite all the doom and gloom, there’s reason to believe someone could find Parade enticing. It all comes back to the Sunday paper connection. With more papers cutting their own Sunday magazines, Parade has managed to benefit from that and add those papers to its circulation.

Not the prettiest way to stay afloat, but the first step to swimming is to avoid drowning.

Correction (6/12 11:15 am):
A previous version of this post stated that React was a “new” product from Parade. React was launched in 1994 and folded several years later.

Andy Abrahams Leaves People for Parade

Andy Abrahams is joining Parade as its new executive editor. Abrahams comes to the magazine from People, where he had been for the past 28 years. He most recently served as People’s editorial manager, but during his time there served as chief of reporters, writer and reporter.

“Along with Parade.com’s incredible leader Brad Dunn, Andy Abrahams will play a pivotal role in expanding Parade’s footprint beyond Sunday,” said the title’s editor-in-chief, Maggie Murphy, in a statement. “Working with him at People was one of the luckiest things that ever happened to me, and I am thrilled he chose to join me here.”

In other Parade news, Jessica Wozinsky has been named social media editor. She most recently served as the magazine’s senior editor.

EatingWell Names New Editor, Parade Media Hires Two

A few Revolving Door items for you to note:

  • EatingWell has promoted Jessie Price to editor-in-chief. Price has been with the magazine since 2003, when she was testing recipes. The next year she joined its editorial staff as an assistant food editor. Price most recently served as deputy editor of food. She will report to Tom Witschi, executive VP/president of  Meredith Women’s Lifestyle Group.
  • Parade Media Group has added Nathan Kania as VP of digital sales and Hilary Pereira as director of integrated solutions. Kania comes to Parade from Amazon, where he served as sales lead in the site’s Financial Services Sector. Pereira had been serving as Parade’s director of integrated solutions on a contract basis for the past four months. Prior to that she worked at Time Warner and Time Inc.

Parade Updates Logo for First Time in Over 30 Years

Parade has a new logo for the first time in over 30 years. It vaguely resembles the magazine’s 1960s version and we like it. Even though the logo is sort of retro looking, it still feels fresh. Don’t agree? Well, you’re wrong.

The update is only part of bigger changes at Parade. Its website has a new, clean look, featuring four major categories: Entertainment, Food, Living, and Health & Beauty.

To get the word out on these updates, Parade is taking an usual route: By plastering it on a car. Specifically, a Chevy driven by Jamie McMurray in NASCAR’s FedEx 400. The race is this Sunday, the same day the new issue debuts.

We’re fans of the new Parade, but we don’t know enough about NASCAR to make an effective pun, so we’ll just call this the finish line. Yeah, well, whatever. We tried.

Get $3 a Word at Parade

Luckily for freelancers, the most widely read magazine in America also relies on them for content: 80 percent of Parade comes from outside contributors since the pub has no staff writers. It’s definitely worth your words too; freelancers can snag $3 for each one.

Published by Advance Publications, Parade is carried by more than 640 Sunday newspapers and reaches an estimated 63 million readers. The mag’s wide reach means that freelancers have a large range of topics to choose from. From local stories to service pieces to national trends, tailoring your pitch to a broad national audience will impress editors at the pub.

Read more in How To Pitch: Parade. [subscription required]

Get $3 a Word at Parade

Luckily for freelancers, the most widely read magazine in America also relies on them for content: 80 percent of Parade comes from outside contributors since the pub has no staff writers. It’s definitely worth your words too; freelancers can snag $3 for each one.

Published by Advance Publications, Parade is carried by more than 640 Sunday newspapers and reaches an estimated 63 million readers. The mag’s wide reach means that freelancers have a large range of topics to choose from. From local stories to service pieces to national trends, tailoring your pitch to a broad national audience will impress editors at the pub.

Read more in How To Pitch: Parade. [subscription required]

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