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Posts Tagged ‘Paul Krugman’

Four Vie For 2009 Thurber Prize|FBDC Founding Editor Graff Takes Over Washingtonian|NYT Columnist Buys New Home|Us Weekly Thrives|Economist Sells Single Copies In U.K.

GalleyCat: The organizers of the Thurber Prize for American Humor couldn’t narrow their short list down to the usual three candidates — so this year there are four authors competing for the $5,000 prize: Sloane Crosley, Ian Frazier, Don Lee and Laurie Notaro.

FishbowlDC: FBDC’s founding editor Garrett Graff has been named editor of Washingtonian.

Observer: New York Times columnist Paul Krugman has purchased a $1.7 million three-bed on Riverside Drive.

WWD: For the first time, Us Weekly‘s Web site has surpassed People.com in number of unique visitors. The magazine seems to be getting along fine since longtime editor Janice Min‘s departure: acting EiC Michael Steele‘s first issue sold 1.1 million copies on newsstands.

Guardian: You can now buy single copies of The Economist in the U.K.

WNYC Debuts Live Broadcasts in The Greene Space With Lou Reed Concert

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Photo credit: Scott Ellison Smith

On Tuesday afternoon, we were lucky enough to catch a live performance of Soundcheck with John Schaefer at WNYC‘s new downtown performance space, The Greene Space. The show — featuring a discussion between the host, Santi “Santigold” White, Lou Reed, and Mary Rowell from the string quartet Ethel — and performances from the latter two artists — was the first live broadcast in the room’s history. It kicked off a 10-day festival celebrating the new venue, which got a nice write-up in The New York Times last week. Additional live radio shows in the near future include The Brian Lehrer Show (with guest Paul Krugman) and The Leonard Lopate Show.

The Greene Space, which is located at street level on the corner of Varick and Charlton Sts., is a multimedia space that includes video cameras, LCD screens, and room for a live audience. Programs can be streamed live on the Web, as well as shown via video feed.

During the discussion portion — you can hear the audio on WNYC’s Web site — the host and guests debated whether the downtown art scene was dead. All agreed that there were a couple places in Manhattan where the art scene is still alive (notably The Stone on Avenue C), but most of it has moved to Brooklyn.

At one point, Schaefer posited that this wasn’t a new occurrence. “Didn’t the Village Voice declare it dead in like 1978?,” he asked. Reed, who was appropriately sporting a Coney Island t-shirt, drew laughs with his answer: “They can’t even sell the Village Voice. Who cares what they say? That’s why they have to give it away.”

To end the show, Reed played his song, “Juliet Had Romeo.” He seemed to take a punk rocker’s glee in using a couple of choice four-letter words. WNYC’s producers used the delay to blip them. Everyone went home happy.

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Photo credit: Matthew Arnold

The Morning Media Menu, Pirates(!) Edition

mornmm.gifToday on the menu we chat first about Gorilla blogging (otherwise known as Verizon cutting off my internet and leaving me to wander the streets this morning prowling for an non-password coded signal). After which we are joined by Rachel Sklar who drops in to chat about Pirates.

Paul Krugman said yesterday on This Week on ABC, he made a joke about trying to equate the puppies and pirates as a photogenic distraction, and I thought that was inappropriate because at that point Captain Phillips hadn’t been freed,” says Sklar of the tone of some pirate coverage. “You’re talking about people boarding boats with AK-47s.”

Also discussed: Has the Internet killed the scoop, and what about the ads on the front page of the LA Times? You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

Salman Rushdie Launches PEN World Voices Festival

GalleyCat caught up with Salman Rushdie yesterday at the launch of the PEN World Voices Festival held on the patio of the Instituto Cervantes. The festival, which is celebrating its fifth year — if you build it they will come! says Rushdie — runs from April 27 to May 3 in New York City and will feature 160 writers from 40 different countries. Some names you might recognize include Paul Krugman, Adam Gopnik, Neil Gaiman, Parker Posey, Lou Reed, Laurie Anderson, and Francine Prose. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Check out the entire line-up here.

The Recruitment Song for Paul Krugman

This is Jonathan Mann singing a plea to NYTimes Columnist Paul Krugman to be the Secretary of the Treasury.

“For god sakes you won the Nobel Prize – Timothy Geithner uses Turbo Tax.”

Via Buzzfeed

Forbes.com Ranks the Liberal Media Elite

large_fey_palin_01.jpgForbes.com has compiled a list of the 25 Most Influential Liberals in US Media, which depending on who you are includes most of the East Coast, or begins and ends with Arianna Huffington (who ranks second). A number of people on the list are bloggers: Ezra Klein, Josh Marshall, and our favorite addition, Andrew Sullivan, whose support of both Obama and Gay marriage has apparently forever excluded him from the GOP camp.

However the two entries we find most intriguing are the op-ed page editors of both the New York Times and the Washington Post. David Shipley of the Times comes in at nine, and Fred Hiatt of WaPo makes the top three. Says Forbes of Shipley: “Relatively unknown, compared with others on this list, he runs the most widely read op-ed page in America. The page is poised to challenge left-leaning shibboleths from within the fold while still remaining faithful to the Times’ core liberal values.” In case you’re wondering Paul Krugman occupies top spot. See the full list here.

The New York Times to do an Obama Book

nyt1105.jpgPer today’s Publisher’s Marketplace:

OBAMA: The Historic Journey, a heavily-illustrated book covering Barack Obama‘s life, from his childhood through his inauguration as the 44th president of the United States, with a final chapter that includes the inaugural address and a 32-page photo essay by 12 New York Times staff photographers, with an introduction by NYT executive editor Bill Keller and essays from Times staff and contributors including Frank Rich, Thomas Friedman, Paul Krugman, Maureen Dowd, David Brooks, and Gail Collins, to Geoff Kloske to Riverhead, for publication on February 16, 2009, by Scott Moyers at The Wylie Agency, produced by the New York Times and Callaway Arts & Entertainment.

The Financial Crisis Explained: It Was All Just Pretend Money

heckonomics_wealth1.jpgIt’s been a few days since we looked into the Financial Crisis of ’08, which in the current Internet news cycle is pretty much the equivalent of a few months. Paul Krugman, the Nobel prize-winning NYT columnist, says that it’s going to get worse before it gets better. The President seems to be talking a lot but at this point pretty much no one is listening. And the original bailout was a bad idea so now they’re trying a new one. However, as of yet no one has really explained where all the money went (other than to partridge hunts in England, but even that couldn’t account for it all). Until now! Today we turn to another Carney for explanation (and yes they’re related…apparently it’s all the result of some ambitious breakfast experiment). Per Tim Carney writing today at Culture 11:

So, what the heck happened to all that money? Did somebody take it?…Not really. Most of the wealth we “lost” was wealth that never really existed. The core of our loss is that home values and expected future home values are not as high as people had thought. From that fact, there is a ripple effect that has frozen credit markets and brought down stock prices. That’s not to say there isn’t real loss in our downturn. It’s also true that some people are making money off of our woes. But the heart of the story is mis-valuation.

So basically we’re having a real crisis based on imaginary money, which begs the question who exactly put these people in charge? At some point someone may also be able to explain why we can’t now use fake money to bail us back out.

Paul Krugman Wins 2008 Nobel Prize for Economics

ts-krugman-190.jpgThe Swedes may not like our novelists and poets but apparently our economists (and Op-eders) are great. Reuters is reporting that New York Times columnist and Princeton professor Paul Krugman has been awarded the 2008 Nobel prize for economics. The $1.4 million prize “recognised Krugman’s formulation of a new theory to answer questions driving world-wide urbanisation.”

He has thereby integrated the previously disparate research fields of international trade and economic geography.

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