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Posts Tagged ‘PBS’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Newsweek Controversy | Mexico Moves on Telco | NJ President Out

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newsweek bitcoin

Controversy Marks Newsweek’s Comeback (The Associated Press)
A mystery man. A splashy reveal. A media frenzy. Newsweek staked its return from the dead Friday on a story it knew would get attention. A cover story claiming it had uncovered “the face behind Bitcoin,” the world’s most popular digital currency. Twenty-four hours after identifying Bitcoin’s creator as a 64-year-old former defense contractor employee living in Los Angeles, the controversy over whether or not Newsweek had outed the right man was so furious that Newsweek reporter Leah McGrath Goodman made the rounds on Bloomberg TV and CBS Morning News to defend her reporting against Dorian Nakamoto’s denials that he is the father of Bitcoin. Mashable For the first few hours after the article was published online Thursday, Newsweek enjoyed the kind of attention that most publications would kill for. The Bitcoin story dominated the conversation on social media; 700,000 readers had viewed it as of 5 p.m. ET on Thursday. It went on to top 1 million views. FishbowlNY Within the first few hours of the story’s release, however, Nakamoto emerged to deny any involvement with the digital currency, prompting a media frenzy. In a two-hour interview with the AP Thursday, Nakamoto denied having any involvement in Bitcoin, and the only reason he had ever heard of it was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son three weeks ago. Nakamoto also said that during a brief interview at his home, McGrath Goodman misunderstood him (English isn’t Nakamoto’s first language). Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The account that created Bitcoin in 2009 has also suggested that the Newsweek story is inaccurate: “I’m not Dorian Nakamoto,” said the account holder, whose online name is Satoshi Nakamoto, according to USA Today. Newsweek In a statement released Friday, Newsweek defended the story: “Goodman’s research was conducted under the same high editorial and ethical standards that have guided Newsweek for more than 80 years. Newsweek stands strongly behind Goodman and her article”

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M. Night Shyamalan Tackles America’s Public Education Problem

We’ve never been quite as down on M. Night Shyamalan‘s more recent cinematic output as most people seem to be. Sure, some of his later flicks have fallen spectacularly flat, but at least he aims higher in terms of plot than say a Michael Bay. We can imagine those same critics cynically reacting to Shyamalan’s surprising sideline project.

Shyamalan was a guest on Tavis Smiley‘s PBS show earlier this week, talking about his new book I’ve Been Schooled: The Unlikely Story of How a Moonlighting Movie Maker Learned the Five Keys to Closing America’s Education Gap. The title says it all, and at the very beginning of the conversation, the filmmaker says people should rightly be skeptical of a guy like him authoring a book like this.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Rose Interviews Assad | Obama Gives Interviews | Politico Buys Capital NY


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Charlie Rose Interviews Bashar al-Assad
(TVNewser)
CBS This Morning co-host Charlie Rose got an interview Sunday with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. This is Assad’s first TV interview since President Obama asked Congress to approve the use of force against the Syrian regime for use of chemical weapons. Rose, now in Beirut, called in to Face the Nation with Bob Schieffer. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media In the interview, Assad denied that he had anything to do with the chemical weapons attack that took place on Aug. 21, 2013. Rose also said the Syrian president would not confirm or deny that the regime has chemical weapons. NYT The interview, which was arranged in the last few days amid a Congressional debate about whether to authorize a limited military strike against Syria, will be broadcast on Monday by CBS and PBS. In a sign of the significance of the interview, he was accompanied by Jeffrey Fager, the chairman of CBS News and the top producer of 60 Minutes. HuffPost It is the first interview that al-Assad has given to an American news network in two years. Barbara Walters sat down with him in Syria in 2011. The Guardian It is Rose’s second major scoop of the summer. In June, he interviewed Obama as the president defended the record of the National Security Agency, following revelations in The Guardian regarding the mass surveillance of US and foreign citizens.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN Dumps Frontline | Manning Puzzles Journos | Kochs Walk From LA Times


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ESPN Pulls Out of Frontline Concussion Investigation (Deadspin)
For a while now, ESPN’s big alibi, the thing Bristol would trot out any time someone questioned the company’s journalistic bona fides, was its joint investigation into NFL head injuries with PBS’ Frontline. Now that’s done with. ESPN said in a statement: “Because ESPN is neither producing nor exercising editorial control over the Frontline documentaries, there will be no co-branding involving ESPN on the documentaries or their marketing materials. The use of ESPN’s marks could incorrectly imply that we have editorial control. As we have in the past, we will continue to cover the concussion story through our own reporting.” PBS / Frontline “…[We] regret ESPN’s decision to end a collaboration that has spanned the last 15 months and is based on the work of ESPN reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru, as well as Frontline’s own original journalism. Over that time, we’ve enjoyed a productive partnership with ESPN’s investigative program, Outside the Lines, jointly publishing and co-branding several ground-breaking articles on our respective websites and on their broadcast. We’ve been in sync on the goals of our reporting: to present the deepest accounting so far of the league’s handling of questions around the long-term impact of concussions. This editorial partnership was similar to our many other collaborations with news organizations over the years.” TVNewser The partnership resulted in a number of long-form articles about the NFL’s response to concussions, as well as a number of reports on Outside the Lines, ESPN’s acclaimed newsmagazine. NYT The NFL was not supportive of the documentary. Greg Aiello, a spokesman for the league, said it declined to make commissioner Roger Goodell and other executives available for it. The league allowed the doctors who advise it on concussions to decide themselves if they wanted to take part. The Atlantic Wire ESPN has previously faced criticism over its coverage of the impact of concussions and head injuries on NFL players. Because the network makes a lot of money from broadcasting NFL games, there is concern of an acute conflict of interest going on between the editorial and business sides of the Connecticut-based company.

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Chinese Charity Sues Nicholas Kristof for Breach of Agreement

Half the Sky Foundation , a non-profit with offices in Beijing, Hong Kong and Berkeley, is going after New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, his wife Sheryl WuDunn and several others for allegedly misappropriating the organization’s trademarked name.

The plaintiffs claim that after all parties worked hard to come to agreement last fall as to when and how their trademarked name Half the Sky could be used for the purposes of a two-part PBS documentary, the agreement was breached in various ways. From Courthouse News Service reporter Dan McCue‘s summary:

The foundation claims the defendants solicited donations for numerous charities using the Half The Sky mark, displayed it prominently on their website and used it for branding on flyers and on social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+ and YouTube.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: PBS NewsHour Cuts Staff | Greece Suspends Network | Interns Beat Fox


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Layoffs And Cutbacks at PBS NewsHour
(NYT)
The PBS NewsHour, the signature nightly newscast on public television, is planning its first significant round of layoffs in nearly two decades. Because of declines in support from corporate sponsors, the show’s producer, MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, will close the two offices it has outside of the Washington area — in Denver and San Francisco — and lay off most of the employees there. The company, which is based in Arlington, Va., will also eliminate several of what it calls “noncritical production positions” at its main office. TVNewser None of the affected staffers were named in the email, but TVNewser hears that one of those departing is San Francisco correspondent Spencer Michels, who started reporting for the program 30 years ago. While the program will still maintain in-house crews, the NewsHour will rely more on freelance contributions going forward. Poynter / MediaWire “We believe the staff restructuring and production changes, along with continuing Web investment, will make us stronger and enable us to be more effective and nimble,” NewsHour public relations manager Anne Bell writes in an email to Poynter. Deadline Hollywood It will be the show’s first major round of layoffs since the mid-‘90s. Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: PBS NewsHour Cuts Staff | Greece Suspends Network | Interns Beat Fox


Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.


Layoffs And Cutbacks at PBS NewsHour
(NYT)
The PBS NewsHour, the signature nightly newscast on public television, is planning its first significant round of layoffs in nearly two decades. Because of declines in support from corporate sponsors, the show’s producer, MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, will close the two offices it has outside of the Washington area — in Denver and San Francisco — and lay off most of the employees there. The company, which is based in Arlington, Va., will also eliminate several of what it calls “noncritical production positions” at its main office. TVNewser None of the affected staffers were named in the email, but TVNewser hears that one of those departing is San Francisco correspondent Spencer Michels, who started reporting for the program 30 years ago. While the program will still maintain in-house crews, the NewsHour will rely more on freelance contributions going forward. Poynter / MediaWire “We believe the staff restructuring and production changes, along with continuing Web investment, will make us stronger and enable us to be more effective and nimble,” NewsHour public relations manager Anne Bell writes in an email to Poynter. Deadline Hollywood It will be the show’s first major round of layoffs since the mid-‘90s.

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Matt Kemp Travels to Sesame Street

Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp is the latest local athlete to pay a visit to Sesame Street, appearing on the iconic children’s show Thursday.

And since the kid inside of you is wondering, the word of the day was attach.

As in I hope the surgeon who performed offseason shoulder surgery on Kemp made sure to attach it back to his body.

[H/T Big League Stew]

Talking Oscars with Longtime Movie Critic Jeffrey Lyons

Jeffrey Lyons is back on WCBS 880 with his popular movie review segment, the nationally heard Lyons Den Radio.

Lyons, known for more than 40 years of his insightful cinematic critiques and entertaining interviews, worked at 880 from 1975 to 1994. He was also a regular reviewer on WPIX from 1970 to 1991.

Lyons took his local voice national with PBS’ Sneak Previews, which had a 14-year run. Most recently, Lyons brought the “Den” to WNBC. His 13-year run included a syndicated Reel Talk that he created.

With the Oscars being polished up for Sunday’s 85th annual event, it seemed like the perfect opportunity to speak to Lyons and pick his brain about the contenders and possible surprises.

“My upset pick is Hugh Jackman for Best Actor for Les Mis,” Lyons tells FishbowlNY. “Jackman gave one of the great performances I’ve ever seen.”

He expects Daniel Day-Lewis, though, will nab his record-setting third Best Actor for his portrayal of America’s 16th president.

The buzz is building for Steven Spielberg, director of Lincoln.

“I think he’s going to win. He has an Oscar pedigree,” Lyons says. “He hasn’t won enough to suit me. He’s the greatest filmmaker of our time … I’m glad to be alive in the Steven Spielberg era.”

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Grammy Awards Give WCBS Another Week to Shine

Call it a “one-two punch.” WCBS/Channel 2 took the top weekly honors from the annual Grammy Awards Sunday night. The telecast (one week after CBS’ telecast of the Super Bowl) had an estimated 2.8 million viewers and a 14.6 rating, according to Nielsen.

In all, seven CBS programs packed the Top 10. At number two was NCIS with 1.2 million viewers and a 6.4 rating, while Big Bang Theory tied for third with AMC’s Breaking Bad, (1 million/5.2 rating.)

ABC’s Modern Family was fifth (985,000/5.0). The Wednesday night edition of American Idol on WNYW tied for seventh (908,000/4.6). The Thursday installment was 11th for the week (858,000/4.4).

The latest episode of PBS’ Downton Abbey on WNET was 14th (734,000/3.7). WNBC had no entries in the Top 30. More from the Top 10 after the jump…

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