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Posts Tagged ‘PBS’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Vargas Detained, Released | Abramson Books Two Interviews

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Jose Antonio Vargas Released From Federal Custody in Texas (TVNewser)
Jose Antonio Vargas, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who was the focus of the recent CNN documentary Documented, was released from the custody of U.S. Border Patrol agents Tuesday evening. FishbowlDC Vargas was detained in McAllen, Texas Tuesday, days after speculating that he may be stuck in the border town. On Friday, Vargas wrote an essay for Politico, where he described his visit to a children’s shelter for Central American refugees. FishbowlNY Vargas was leaving the town to go to a screening of his film in Los Angeles when he was arrested. He was brought to a border patrol station for questioning. Supporters and members of the media gathered across the street, and were warned that if they approached the station any closer, they would also be arrested. HuffPost Vargas flew to the border last week to interview and film undocumented immigrants who have fled their home countries in Central America due to escalating violence. A TSA agent at the McAllen-Miller Airport initially cleared Vargas’ Philippines-issued passport when he attempted to board a flight Tuesday morning. He was placed into custody soon after, however, when he couldn’t produce a U.S. visa at the request of a border patrol agent. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Vargas, who won a Pulitzer as part of a Washington Post team in 2008, has become an outspoken advocate for undocumented immigrants after “coming out” as undocumented in a New York Times story in 2011.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: USA-Ghana Sets Ratings Record | Apple Settles eBook Suit

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USA-Ghana Sets Ratings Record for ESPN (TVNewser)
ESPN’s last World Cup before turning over the broadcast rights to Fox Sports is off to a good start: Monday night’s USA-Ghana match was the most-watched men’s soccer match ever on ESPN or ESPN2, drawing 11.1 million viewers per minute. Capital New York Univision averaged 4.8 million viewers for its language coverage, according to overnight data from Nielsen. All told, an average of 16 million people watched the game live on television, with at least 1.4 million more watching (legally) online. Bleacher Report But even before that game, ESPN was already enjoying some of its best ratings ever. Through the first 11 games, the networks of ESPN, ESPN2 and ABC had averaged about 3.7 million viewers. That was a 2 percent bump over the 2010 World Cup, which of course included a weekend game featuring the United States and England on ABC. If the ratings from that England match are removed, ratings were up a rather mind-blowing 37 percent. AllFacebook Team USA’s thrilling 2-1 victory caused some 10 million Facebook users to produce more than 15 million interactions on the social network, according to the Facebook Data Science Team. Variety The soccer tourney has already broken the previous global record for online-video streaming. Monday’s Germany-Portugal match drove a peak of 4.3 terabits per second of streaming video on the Akamai Technologies content-delivery network — blasting past the previous high of 3.5 Tbps for the U.S.-Canada men’s hockey semifinal during the 2014 Winter Olympics. The streaming-video peak for the USA-Ghana match came in at 3.2 Tbps, behind last Friday’s 3.5 Tbps for the Spain-Netherlands contest, according to Akamai.

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Digital Media Guru Douglas Rushkoff Joins CUNY Faculty

RushkoffBeginning this fall at CUNY’s Queens College, students can work their way towards an MA in Media Studies. Set to mold the curriculum is an expert responsible for terms such as “viral media” and “social currency.”

From today’s announcement:

This marks the first full-time academic role for Douglas Rushkoff, a prolific media theorist, award-winning author and documentarian considered one of the most influential thinkers of the digital age. Starting this August, he will help lead the development of a new Master of Arts in Media Studies program that will address the technological and market forces that dominate our daily lives.

Rushkoff, who holds a PhD in New Media and Digital Culture, is the author of over a dozen best-selling books, the winner of the first Neil Postman Award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity and creator of four award-winning PBS Frontline documentaries on the cultural and societal impact of media and the media industry.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: NPR Appoints CEO | Colbert’s Successor Named | Clippers Tap Parsons

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Jarl Mohn Becomes NPR President and CEO (FishbowlDC)
The board of directors of NPR announced Friday that it has selected Jarl Mohn to become its next president and chief executive officer. WSJ Mohn is becoming the fifth leader in a five-year stretch marred by scandal and financial woes. Mohn hails from a flashier background than some of his predecessors at NPR. He spent years as a radio DJ, under the pseudonym Lee Masters, and served as an executive at MTV and VH1 before creating and running E! Entertainment Television. He subsequently served as chief executive of Liberty Digital Inc., a subsidiary of Liberty Media Group focused on interactive and cable television. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Mohn, who currently serves as chairman of Southern California Public Radio, will begin his tenure as CEO on July 1. He was recruited by acting CEO Paul Haaga, who had been running the network since September after the unexpected resignation of Gary Knell, who left to join National Geographic. Deadline New York Knell left NPR after 21 months on the job, succeeding Vivian Schiller, who was forced to resign over a string of controversies. In September NPR hoped to cut its staff by 10 percent by offering staffers a voluntary buyout. It was part of a two-year plan to eliminate an operating cash deficit expected to hit $6.1 million. HuffPost / AP Board chair Kit Jensen says Mohn has a keen ability to identify media and consumer trends and has a strong track record on diversity and fairness. Mohn said in a statement that he considers the new position a mission, not a job.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Couric Back to NBC? | Logan’s CBS Return Unsure | #AmazonCart Launches

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Katie Couric in Talks to Co-Host Today (New York Post)
Katie Couric is in preliminary talks to head back to NBC’s Today – at least on a temporary basis. Couric is a contender to sit in and co-host the No. 2 morning show while Savannah Guthrie is on maternity leave, sources say. TVNewser “With the Today show in a good place, we are blessed with great talent and many options to temporarily fill Savannah’s chair while she’s on leave, but there’s no plan yet,” an NBC spokeswoman said. In March, Couric recounted the last time she filled in on the Today show for a pregnant co-anchor. It was early 1991 when Deborah Norville, who’d been co-host of Today for 14 months, gave birth. Couric would go on to be named co-anchor, where she’d remain for 15 years. Mediaite Couric’s career has touched each of the three big networks (NBC, CBS and ABC), and now she is the global news anchor for Yahoo! News. Couric guest co-hosted Good Morning America back in 2012 on the same day Sarah Palin guest-hosted on Today. Mashable A deal to bring Couric back might be difficult, as she currently works for Yahoo!, which has a deal with ABC to share news content. Couric is one of Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer’s biggest signings, inking the anchor to a $6 million per year deal. Getting Couric even for a short stint would be big for Today, as putting the old band back together could help the show to reclaim its past lead over rival GMA. Former co-anchors Couric and Matt Lauer haven’t been behind the desk together since Couric left Today in 2006. TheWrap The beloved former Today host would be contractually free to rejoin the show in the fall, should early speculation pan out the way that many fans probably hope it will. Former Today co-host Meredith Vieira has also been named in media reports as one of those potential seat-fillers.

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A Screening Dedicated to a Late, Great Journalism Prof

Tonight at the Tri-State Museum in Belle Fourche, South Dakota, there will be a very special screening of PBS documentary The Last Cowboy. The event is being held in the name of one of the movie’s champions, William “Bill” Kunerth, a retired journalism professor who passed away last December.

From a recent bit of coverage in the Butte County Post:

The ranch-raised, nationally-recognized journalism professor hoped someone would show the real life of a cowboy in a modern setting. The 6:30 p.m. showing will be free or by donation in memory of the longtime volunteer and museum supporter…

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Newsweek Controversy | Mexico Moves on Telco | NJ President Out

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newsweek bitcoin

Controversy Marks Newsweek’s Comeback (The Associated Press)
A mystery man. A splashy reveal. A media frenzy. Newsweek staked its return from the dead Friday on a story it knew would get attention. A cover story claiming it had uncovered “the face behind Bitcoin,” the world’s most popular digital currency. Twenty-four hours after identifying Bitcoin’s creator as a 64-year-old former defense contractor employee living in Los Angeles, the controversy over whether or not Newsweek had outed the right man was so furious that Newsweek reporter Leah McGrath Goodman made the rounds on Bloomberg TV and CBS Morning News to defend her reporting against Dorian Nakamoto’s denials that he is the father of Bitcoin. Mashable For the first few hours after the article was published online Thursday, Newsweek enjoyed the kind of attention that most publications would kill for. The Bitcoin story dominated the conversation on social media; 700,000 readers had viewed it as of 5 p.m. ET on Thursday. It went on to top 1 million views. FishbowlNY Within the first few hours of the story’s release, however, Nakamoto emerged to deny any involvement with the digital currency, prompting a media frenzy. In a two-hour interview with the AP Thursday, Nakamoto denied having any involvement in Bitcoin, and the only reason he had ever heard of it was because a Newsweek reporter contacted his son three weeks ago. Nakamoto also said that during a brief interview at his home, McGrath Goodman misunderstood him (English isn’t Nakamoto’s first language). Politico / Dylan Byers on Media The account that created Bitcoin in 2009 has also suggested that the Newsweek story is inaccurate: “I’m not Dorian Nakamoto,” said the account holder, whose online name is Satoshi Nakamoto, according to USA Today. Newsweek In a statement released Friday, Newsweek defended the story: “Goodman’s research was conducted under the same high editorial and ethical standards that have guided Newsweek for more than 80 years. Newsweek stands strongly behind Goodman and her article”

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M. Night Shyamalan Tackles America’s Public Education Problem

We’ve never been quite as down on M. Night Shyamalan‘s more recent cinematic output as most people seem to be. Sure, some of his later flicks have fallen spectacularly flat, but at least he aims higher in terms of plot than say a Michael Bay. We can imagine those same critics cynically reacting to Shyamalan’s surprising sideline project.

Shyamalan was a guest on Tavis Smiley‘s PBS show earlier this week, talking about his new book I’ve Been Schooled: The Unlikely Story of How a Moonlighting Movie Maker Learned the Five Keys to Closing America’s Education Gap. The title says it all, and at the very beginning of the conversation, the filmmaker says people should rightly be skeptical of a guy like him authoring a book like this.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Rose Interviews Assad | Obama Gives Interviews | Politico Buys Capital NY


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Charlie Rose Interviews Bashar al-Assad
(TVNewser)
CBS This Morning co-host Charlie Rose got an interview Sunday with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. This is Assad’s first TV interview since President Obama asked Congress to approve the use of force against the Syrian regime for use of chemical weapons. Rose, now in Beirut, called in to Face the Nation with Bob Schieffer. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media In the interview, Assad denied that he had anything to do with the chemical weapons attack that took place on Aug. 21, 2013. Rose also said the Syrian president would not confirm or deny that the regime has chemical weapons. NYT The interview, which was arranged in the last few days amid a Congressional debate about whether to authorize a limited military strike against Syria, will be broadcast on Monday by CBS and PBS. In a sign of the significance of the interview, he was accompanied by Jeffrey Fager, the chairman of CBS News and the top producer of 60 Minutes. HuffPost It is the first interview that al-Assad has given to an American news network in two years. Barbara Walters sat down with him in Syria in 2011. The Guardian It is Rose’s second major scoop of the summer. In June, he interviewed Obama as the president defended the record of the National Security Agency, following revelations in The Guardian regarding the mass surveillance of US and foreign citizens.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: ESPN Dumps Frontline | Manning Puzzles Journos | Kochs Walk From LA Times


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ESPN Pulls Out of Frontline Concussion Investigation (Deadspin)
For a while now, ESPN’s big alibi, the thing Bristol would trot out any time someone questioned the company’s journalistic bona fides, was its joint investigation into NFL head injuries with PBS’ Frontline. Now that’s done with. ESPN said in a statement: “Because ESPN is neither producing nor exercising editorial control over the Frontline documentaries, there will be no co-branding involving ESPN on the documentaries or their marketing materials. The use of ESPN’s marks could incorrectly imply that we have editorial control. As we have in the past, we will continue to cover the concussion story through our own reporting.” PBS / Frontline “…[We] regret ESPN’s decision to end a collaboration that has spanned the last 15 months and is based on the work of ESPN reporters Mark Fainaru-Wada and Steve Fainaru, as well as Frontline’s own original journalism. Over that time, we’ve enjoyed a productive partnership with ESPN’s investigative program, Outside the Lines, jointly publishing and co-branding several ground-breaking articles on our respective websites and on their broadcast. We’ve been in sync on the goals of our reporting: to present the deepest accounting so far of the league’s handling of questions around the long-term impact of concussions. This editorial partnership was similar to our many other collaborations with news organizations over the years.” TVNewser The partnership resulted in a number of long-form articles about the NFL’s response to concussions, as well as a number of reports on Outside the Lines, ESPN’s acclaimed newsmagazine. NYT The NFL was not supportive of the documentary. Greg Aiello, a spokesman for the league, said it declined to make commissioner Roger Goodell and other executives available for it. The league allowed the doctors who advise it on concussions to decide themselves if they wanted to take part. The Atlantic Wire ESPN has previously faced criticism over its coverage of the impact of concussions and head injuries on NFL players. Because the network makes a lot of money from broadcasting NFL games, there is concern of an acute conflict of interest going on between the editorial and business sides of the Connecticut-based company.

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