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Posts Tagged ‘PBS’

Chinese Charity Sues Nicholas Kristof for Breach of Agreement

Half the Sky Foundation , a non-profit with offices in Beijing, Hong Kong and Berkeley, is going after New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, his wife Sheryl WuDunn and several others for allegedly misappropriating the organization’s trademarked name.

The plaintiffs claim that after all parties worked hard to come to agreement last fall as to when and how their trademarked name Half the Sky could be used for the purposes of a two-part PBS documentary, the agreement was breached in various ways. From Courthouse News Service reporter Dan McCue‘s summary:

The foundation claims the defendants solicited donations for numerous charities using the Half The Sky mark, displayed it prominently on their website and used it for branding on flyers and on social media platforms including Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, Google+ and YouTube.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: PBS NewsHour Cuts Staff | Greece Suspends Network | Interns Beat Fox


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Layoffs And Cutbacks at PBS NewsHour
(NYT)
The PBS NewsHour, the signature nightly newscast on public television, is planning its first significant round of layoffs in nearly two decades. Because of declines in support from corporate sponsors, the show’s producer, MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, will close the two offices it has outside of the Washington area — in Denver and San Francisco — and lay off most of the employees there. The company, which is based in Arlington, Va., will also eliminate several of what it calls “noncritical production positions” at its main office. TVNewser None of the affected staffers were named in the email, but TVNewser hears that one of those departing is San Francisco correspondent Spencer Michels, who started reporting for the program 30 years ago. While the program will still maintain in-house crews, the NewsHour will rely more on freelance contributions going forward. Poynter / MediaWire “We believe the staff restructuring and production changes, along with continuing Web investment, will make us stronger and enable us to be more effective and nimble,” NewsHour public relations manager Anne Bell writes in an email to Poynter. Deadline Hollywood It will be the show’s first major round of layoffs since the mid-‘90s. Read more

Morning Media Newsfeed: PBS NewsHour Cuts Staff | Greece Suspends Network | Interns Beat Fox


Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.


Layoffs And Cutbacks at PBS NewsHour
(NYT)
The PBS NewsHour, the signature nightly newscast on public television, is planning its first significant round of layoffs in nearly two decades. Because of declines in support from corporate sponsors, the show’s producer, MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, will close the two offices it has outside of the Washington area — in Denver and San Francisco — and lay off most of the employees there. The company, which is based in Arlington, Va., will also eliminate several of what it calls “noncritical production positions” at its main office. TVNewser None of the affected staffers were named in the email, but TVNewser hears that one of those departing is San Francisco correspondent Spencer Michels, who started reporting for the program 30 years ago. While the program will still maintain in-house crews, the NewsHour will rely more on freelance contributions going forward. Poynter / MediaWire “We believe the staff restructuring and production changes, along with continuing Web investment, will make us stronger and enable us to be more effective and nimble,” NewsHour public relations manager Anne Bell writes in an email to Poynter. Deadline Hollywood It will be the show’s first major round of layoffs since the mid-‘90s.

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Matt Kemp Travels to Sesame Street

Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp is the latest local athlete to pay a visit to Sesame Street, appearing on the iconic children’s show Thursday.

And since the kid inside of you is wondering, the word of the day was attach.

As in I hope the surgeon who performed offseason shoulder surgery on Kemp made sure to attach it back to his body.

[H/T Big League Stew]

Talking Oscars with Longtime Movie Critic Jeffrey Lyons

Jeffrey Lyons is back on WCBS 880 with his popular movie review segment, the nationally heard Lyons Den Radio.

Lyons, known for more than 40 years of his insightful cinematic critiques and entertaining interviews, worked at 880 from 1975 to 1994. He was also a regular reviewer on WPIX from 1970 to 1991.

Lyons took his local voice national with PBS’ Sneak Previews, which had a 14-year run. Most recently, Lyons brought the “Den” to WNBC. His 13-year run included a syndicated Reel Talk that he created.

With the Oscars being polished up for Sunday’s 85th annual event, it seemed like the perfect opportunity to speak to Lyons and pick his brain about the contenders and possible surprises.

“My upset pick is Hugh Jackman for Best Actor for Les Mis,” Lyons tells FishbowlNY. “Jackman gave one of the great performances I’ve ever seen.”

He expects Daniel Day-Lewis, though, will nab his record-setting third Best Actor for his portrayal of America’s 16th president.

The buzz is building for Steven Spielberg, director of Lincoln.

“I think he’s going to win. He has an Oscar pedigree,” Lyons says. “He hasn’t won enough to suit me. He’s the greatest filmmaker of our time … I’m glad to be alive in the Steven Spielberg era.”

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Grammy Awards Give WCBS Another Week to Shine

Call it a “one-two punch.” WCBS/Channel 2 took the top weekly honors from the annual Grammy Awards Sunday night. The telecast (one week after CBS’ telecast of the Super Bowl) had an estimated 2.8 million viewers and a 14.6 rating, according to Nielsen.

In all, seven CBS programs packed the Top 10. At number two was NCIS with 1.2 million viewers and a 6.4 rating, while Big Bang Theory tied for third with AMC’s Breaking Bad, (1 million/5.2 rating.)

ABC’s Modern Family was fifth (985,000/5.0). The Wednesday night edition of American Idol on WNYW tied for seventh (908,000/4.6). The Thursday installment was 11th for the week (858,000/4.4).

The latest episode of PBS’ Downton Abbey on WNET was 14th (734,000/3.7). WNBC had no entries in the Top 30. More from the Top 10 after the jump…

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‘No Better Place’ for Midge Woolsey, Ending WQXR Career After Two Decades

Avid listeners to Classical station WQXR don’t need a formal introduction to Midge Woolsey. She started as a weekend host under The New York Times ownership. Later, she moved to weeknights, and since 2009 Woolsey has been on the middays.

That is all about to end.

After 20 years, Woolsey is singing a Brahms lullaby, as she holds fort on her final broadcast Thursday.

“Anyone would consider it an honor to be a part of what’s gone on, and what is going on at WQXR,” Woolsey tells FishbowlNY. “I can’t think of a better place to be doing the job that I’ve been doing. There is no better place.”

For the veteran broadcaster, she’ll miss everything attached to ‘QXR.

“It’s the whole package. It’s the connection that we make everyday with the listeners,” Woolsey says.

Those loyal fans have been writing well wishes to Woolsey on their Web site. Perhaps from the strong bond that classical music aficionadoes have with their station, many comments were equally passionate about the longtime host.

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WNET Looks Back at 70s for Second Installment of Pioneers of Thirteen

Don’t put away your bell bottoms just yet!

The calendar has turned to another year, but the 50th anniversary celebration continues hasn’t ended at PBS’ Channel 13. In the second installment of the Pioneers of Thirteen, the 1970s are recalled in detail.

Three-time Oscar winner Meryl Streep narrates The ’70s – Bold and Fearless, which takes viewers into an exploration of Thirteen’s second decade on air. It was an era in public television that was defined through creative experimentation. Streep had a connection with PBS before hitting it big in movies (Oscar winner in 1979 for Kramer vs. Kramer). Look for her shining in Wendy Wasserstein‘s first play Uncommon Women and Others from 1978.

Perhaps most important to the 1970s was the political scandal by which all others would be measured going forward–Watergate.

The gavel-to-gavel coverage on WNET in 1973 brought newsmen Robert MacNeil and Jim Lehrer together. It was the precursor for their long-running nightly newscast.

Channel 13 also helped promote the budding career of actor Morgan Freeman (The Electric Company).

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Giants of Broadcasting Celebrates 10th Anniversary

The Library of American Broadcasting is marking its 10th year of immortalizing industry greats. The 2012 edition of the Giants of Broadcasting include two career radio executives, pioneering television newsmen, a man who made a weekly commentary “must see TV,” and a man who helped launched the 24-hour news cycle.

That man is Ted Turner. He turned an upstart CNN into a worldwide cable news powerhouse. Within six years, CNN was in the black. There were the Atlanta Braves, eventually broadcast on his new station TBS. Turner also added the Atlanta Hawks to his prospectus.

Turner, who spoke briefly in his acceptance speech, talked about his proudest moment professionally in 1990 as the Gulf War began.

“I took a nap. When I woke up, I knew the war was coming, and I knew we had our people there. I turned on the television and clicked it over to NBC and there was Tom Brokaw talking. I switched over to CBS and there was Dan Rather talking in the studio. I switched it over to ABC and there was Peter Jennings talking in the studio,” Turner boasts. “Then I flashed it over to CNN, and there was the war. As a journalist, as a television news person, wasn’t that the greatest scoop of all time?”

Another major TV executive was recognized for his body of work. Sir Howard Stringer (above) had a 30-year association with CBS. The Wales-born Stringer, after earning his B.A. and M.A. degrees at the prestigious Oxford University, arrived in New York. His first job at the Tiffany Network was an entry level clerk logging commercial times at WCBS-TV/Channel 2.

Stringer is chairman of the board at Sony Corporation. FishbowlNY spoke to Stringer at the Giants of Broadcasting event. Watch the video clip after the jump.

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Thirteen Takes Stroll Down Memory Lane for 50th Anniversary

FishbowlNY readers are well aware that Channel 13 is celebrating the Big 5-0. And if we’re running a series a pieces dedicated to the major achievement, you can be sure that Thirteen has some unique plans.

Tonight, New York’s first public TV station begins anniversary celebration with a special four-part series, Pioneers of Thirteen. The first episode: The 60s–Expermental Days, dust off the WNET archival footage for memorable moments in station, if not television, history.

Interspersed are interviews with early Channel 13 staffers and managers, including the WNDT (13′s original call letters) founding general manager Richard Heffner.

But the show comes alive with the vintage clips, some not seen they aired decades ago. In the precursor to Great Performances, viewers will be treated to a young but talented Dustin Hoffman performing Journey of the Fifth Horse. It was 1966, a year before Hoffman breakout role in The Graduate.

Other were already established, such as A Conversation with Muhammad Ali, featuring, of course, “The Greatest.”

Jazz Casual has clips of Blues great, B.B. King and Mel Torme, while Aaron Copland is featured on Music in the 20s.

That only scratches the surface to the decade and in turn the one-hour program.

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