TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Peter Kafka’

Tim Armstrong Apologizes for Conference Call Canning

We’re not sure why it took AOL CEO Tim Armstrong two full business days to circulate an internal apology for his on-the-spot firing of Patch creative director Abel Lenz while chairing a Friday August 9 company-wide conference call. But per Romenesko, Peter Kafka and others, that missive has finally been dispatched:

Internal meetings of a confidential nature should not be filmed or recorded so that our employees can feel free to discuss all topics openly. Abel had been told previously not to record a confidential meeting, and he repeated that behavior on Friday, which drove my actions…

On Friday I acted too quickly and I learned a tremendous lesson and I wanted you to hear that directly from me…

Read more

Sponsored Post

Lauren Berger Writes New Book for Young People Entering "Real World"

Lauren Berger Welcome to the Real WorldCareer Expert, Lauren Berger, releases her second book, Welcome to the Real World: Finding Your Place, Perfecting Your Work, and Turning Your Job Into Your Dream Career (Harper Business), on April 22nd. In this book, Berger shares everything she wishes someone told her after graduation. Her book is the essential guide to anyone starting their first, second, or third job. She encourages readers to be fearless, step outside of their comfort zones, and go after what they want.

AOL Partners with Taboola for More Video Views

AOL recently carried a report about Taboola being enlisted by Hearst and TIME to try and help those media companies generate more video-view revenue. They must have liked what they heard, because now AOL has partnered directly with the same company.

Per Peter Kafka of All Things Digital, the AOL move will layer in Taboola’s video recommendations widget in place of a previous deal with Outbrain. From Kafka’s item:

Video used to be a small business for AOL but has grown dramatically, primarily via its acquisition of video syndicator 5Min, which AOL bought in 2010. That year AOL did about $10 million in video revenue; last year [CEO Tim] Armstrong said the company was going to do $100 million in video.

Read more

New York Times to Sell About.com

The New York Times Company has found a company willing to take on the albatross that is About.com. All Things D is reporting that Answers.com has signed a letter of intent to buy the site from the Times for about $270 million.

“The deal hasn’t closed yet, and I’m told that Answers’ backers — PE firms Summit Partners and TA Associates — are trying to line up financing,” explains All Things D’s Peter Kafka.

Though the Times bought About.com for about $410 million in 2005, we’re sure its execs are crossing their fingers that this deal goes through, because the site has been dragging the Times down for awhile now. The most recent example was the Times taking a $195 million write down on the venture in the second quarter.

Major Layoffs at The Daily

Is 18 months of ambitious deficit financing enough to determine it is no longer worth pursuing a particular online news gathering path? Some would say yes, and today, that is exactly what News Corp. has decided.

Peter Kafka of All Things Digital was first with the news. His report was soon followed by a message from editor-in-chief Jesse Angelo and a public press release:

- A total of 50 full-time employees, 29 percent of the full-time staff, will be released.

- The Sports and Opinion sections, which saw the lightest traffic, are being reorganized. Sports reporting will now be provided by content partners, like Fox Sports, while existing features like photo galleries and the ability to track favorite teams via a customizable sports page will remain. The Daily will no longer have a standalone Opinion section. Opinion pieces and editorials will appear in the news pages, clearly marked, from time to time as appropriate.

Read more

Bleacher Report on the Verge of Ideal Exit Strategy

Talk to any Internet content startup exec these days and they will tell you the same thing. The most realistic goal is to build a viable niche community and then wait for a moneyed M&A pal to come calling.

Such appears to be the case with Bleacher Report, the gargantuan sports site based out of San Francisco. Per a report yesterday by AllThingsD’s Peter Kafka, months of talks with Turner Broadcasting System Inc. now seem to be at the bottom-of-the-eight-inning stage:

People familiar with both companies say they haven’t agreed on final terms, but are now negotiating exclusively and have agreed on a price: If the transaction goes through, Time Warner’s cable network unit is set to pay more than $200 million for the sports site.

Read more

The Best Romenesko Reactions

You probably already know this by now, but last night Jim Romenesko — a man widely respected in the media world — resigned early after a ridiculous piece by Poynter’s Julie Moos went up during the day. In the article, Moos attacked Romenesko for the very thing everyone thinks he does the best: Crediting sources and linking.

Moos’ take was so off base and wrong that everyone immediately lashed out at it and her. Romenesko was taken aback by it too, so he quit earlier than he planned to, telling the New York Times, “This really did throw me for a loop.”

A loop is putting it lightly and politely. Romenesko was Poynter, and for them to do that to him was almost surreal. We hope Moos enjoyed writing that, because now that Romenesko is gone, the site’s traffic will disappear too. But enough from us, let’s take a look at some of the best reactions from around the blogosphere.

Read more

News.Me Inches Closer to Launch

News.Me, the iPad news aggregator app, is finally close to launching, according to Peter Kafka. He cites a new website that lists pretty much everything one would need to know about the app, as evidence.

This is big news because News.Me has the approval of publishers that traditionally have opposed aggregating, such as The New York Times and the AP. Other companies that have signed on include AOL, Gawker Media, Mashable, Forbes and Business Insider.

Some details about the app: It costs $.99 cents a week (or $34.99 per year), it gathers news from popular Twitter news feeds and places them into one simple, streamlined feed for users, and publishers who participate with News.Me gain some of its profits.

The revenue sharing is great for those publishers, but any that don’t participate with News.Me still get their information aggregated by the app, while getting left out of the payday. Maybe that’s why such big powerhouses like the Times and Gawker are in on the deal.

FishbowlNY wonders what Bill Keller thinks of his paper partnering in a service that seems to do exactly what he always rants against. We’re guessing it’s probably nothing nice.

UPDATE:
According to The New York Times, News.Me will be available in iTunes beginning tomorrow.

Wired Offers Latest iPad Issue for Free

Wired is offering its newest iPad issue – which will go on sale sometime today – for free. According to Peter Kafka, it comes packed with new features too, including social network sharing tools, and a partnership with Amazon.com that lets users purchase items written about in the magazine, right in the app.

Offering the app for free is a great way to build some buzz, and maybe Wired is doing this because downloads have declined since it first launched the app a year ago. But who knows, perhaps the gimmick will work and once people get a taste they’ll keep coming back for more. Like Jay-Z once said, “Let em test the product, give em a promo show, just a breeze, not enough to catch a real vibe, then we drop a maxi single and charge ‘em two for five.”

Or something like that.

Condé Nast to Raise Prices of iPad GQ and Vanity Fair

In an effort to push consumers toward eventually purchasing subscriptions rather than single issues of its iPad magazines, Condé Nast is going to raise the price of GQ and Vanity Fair in the next few weeks.

Peter Kafka says that GQ will go from $2.99 to $4.99 an issue and Vanity Fair will go from $3.99 to $4.99. The price increase comes in connection with Condé Nast moving their iPad publishing system to one created by Adobe, rather than the current one that is produced in-house. Readers will be asked to download the new app when it becomes available.

Wanting to shift consumers to subscriptions is a good idea, but there’s one (big) little problem, says Kafka:

But that’s not going to be happening at iTunes anytime soon, because none of the big magazine publishers have shown any inclination to accept Apple’s subscription rules — at least for titles they’re already selling in paper form.

Read more

Time Inc. Has Plans for Google’s Android

Yesterday FishbowlNY told you about Time Inc. launching digital subscriptions through the new HP tablet,  and today Peter Kafka is saying that Time will also be announcing a deal with Google for a digital subscription of Sports Illustrated.

Citing a source within Time, Kafka says the magazine will be available for downloading via the Google Android platform, and that more brands will be added as time goes on.

NEXT PAGE >>