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Posts Tagged ‘Peter Kafka’

Time Inc. Teams with HP Tablet for Digital Subscriptions

The thing on the right is HP’s new tablet, the TouchPad, which might not matter much to you until we tell you this: Time Inc. is going to offer digital subscriptions through it on four of its major titles – Sports Illustrated, Time, People and Fortune. See – we told you it mattered. Those are some big guns. Big guns that Apple wasn’t able to secure, says Peter Kafka.

FishbowlNY told you back in January how Time Inc. and a variety of other publishing houses have been working on a tablet app store in which to sell digital subscriptions, and with this news, it appears the plan is coming closer to fruition.

Somewhere, Steve Jobs is ironing a black turtleneck and furrowing his brow.

Sarah Chubb Leaving Condé Nast

Peter Kafka is reporting that Sarah Chubb, President of Condé Nast Digital, is leaving the company after 20 years. Chubb is apparently moving on to pursue other opportunities. Bob Sauerberg commented on her departure in a company-wide memo:

After a wonderful 20-year career at Condé Nast, Sarah Chubb has decided it’s time to explore other opportunities. As we all know, there is a huge amount of energy and excitement in the digital world right now—and Sarah is interested in pursuing the next phase of her career.

Sarah has been a transformational force at Condé Nast and the media business as a whole. I am sure you will all join me in thanking Sarah for her many valuable contributions, congratulating her on her success and wishing her the best of luck as she moves ahead.

Sarah asked me to share her thoughts with you: ‘CN is the premier company in the industry and I have truly loved my job here. I am also tremendously proud of the contributions that my team and I have made to the Company. While the challenges of an exciting new world beckon me, I know that CN is set up exceptionally well for the future.’

In the coming weeks, we will name a successor to continue the outstanding work in digital growth and innovation.

More Rumors for The Daily’s Date

The last we heard The Daily was supposed to launch next Monday, the 17th. That date was reported by Peter Kafka. Now Jeff Bercovici is claiming that next Wednesday, the 19th, will be the day for The Daily. Bercovici says he recieved this date from a News Corp insider, and claims that a spokesperson declined to comment on if this information was correct. There’s also a website for The Daily now, and Bercovici adds, plenty of impatient writers:

The debut can’t come soon enough for The Daily’s staffers, who for weeks have been engaged in full-scale dry runs, cranking out dummy issues for what I’ve been told is a distribution list of 1,000 privileged readers.

It looks like no matter what, sometime next week the world will be blessed with the first iPad-only newspaper. Great job by Kafka and Bercovici getting this information out, but sadly, no one has been able to answer FishbowlNY’s only question: Will The Daily feature the zany antics of Marmaduke?

The Daily Reportedly Launching January 17th

Peter Kafka at All Things D is reporting that The Daily, the iPad-only newspaper from Rupert Murdoch and News Corp. is going to launch Monday, January 17th.

The premiere date for the highly-anticipated digital newspaper has been swirling around the blogosphere for quite some time, but Kafka says “multiple sources” have relayed this information to him.

We’ve got $50 that says Murdoch puts his own face on the cover of the first issue.

Trend List: iPhones Out…Like Really Out

iphone3g-australia.jpgWhile we’re busy talking about e-readers like the Kindle and Apple’s Tablet, being the future of portable, multi-platform technology, we might also want to start digging under our couches for our old, non-smartphone. Because in response to data congestion of AT&T’s service for iPhones in New York City that has been going on all month, the phone company’s solution has reportedly been to stop selling the phone to New Yorkers.

According to one report, New Yorkers are just “not ready” for the iPhone, at least according to Apple’s on own tech support group, which Consumerist writer Laura Northrop called yesterday.

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Partytime With The Atlantic

atlantic2.jpg

Last night, members of the New York media gathered to toast The Atlantic and the incredible year the publication — and its parent company — have had.

There was plenty to celebrate. This year, the title reported a 16 percent increase in advertising revenue, thanks to a 115 percent increase in digital revenue. Events and subscription revenues also saw a boost, with digital subscription revenues climbing 158 percent. What’s more, 2009 saw the launch of the company’s new digital property, The Atlantic Wire, as well as politics, business and food channels on TheAtlantic.com.

“We had such an incredible year,” publisher Jay Lauf told us last night.

And there were plenty of people on hand last night to celebrate that year with Lauf and The Atlantic‘s president Justin Smith, including Glynnis MacNicol and Rachel Sklar of Mediaite.com, All Things D‘s Peter Kafka, John Carney of Silicon Alley Insider, New York Times reporter Brian Stelter and PRNewser editor Joe Ciarallo.

More pictures after the jump

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Peter Kafka Talks “Hulu For Magazines” On The Menu

mmm_2-3.gifTechnology and the media converged today on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu podcast, when host Jason Boog of GalleyCat and Joe Ciarallo of PRNewser welcomed Peter Kafka, tech and media writer for the blog AllThingsD.com.

Jason and Joe picked Pete’s brain about a few of the things he’s been covering closely, including the joint venture between the biggest magazine publishers that he’s been calling “Hulu for Magazines.” Joe asked Pete for his thoughts on the recent press release officially announcing the project.

“They haven’t launched a thing,” Pete said. “All they’ve really done is said, ‘We have an idea, which we’ve agreed to, which is that we’re going to band together and work on distribution and sales of these products that don’t exist yet.’…But really the most important idea really is the fact that they are going to try to control distribution prior to ever building anything.”

“Right now when a magazine actually sells you a subscription they know who you are, they know what your credit card number is, they want all of that,” he went on. “And they want to be able to go to Amazon, Apple and Google for that matter and say, ‘Look, if you want to sell these magazines, you’re going to need to work through us and we’re going to set prices and we’re going to control that relationship.’ That is the most important thing right now.”

Also discussed: Vevo, Boxee, Google and the dueling Wall Street Journal op-eds from Rupert Murdoch and Google CEO Eric Schmidt. Read more of Peter’s thoughts every day at AllThingsD.

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321.

John Byrne BusinessWeek Departure Rumors Turn True

johnbyrne .jpgWhen false reports of the deaths of Lady Gaga or Jeff Goldblum get blasted all over Twitter, it becomes a trend piece in The New York Times. “The Internet Who Cried Wolf” serves as a gentle reminder that not everything you read online is true.

The media equivalent of course, would be Anna Wintour‘s departure from Vogue. There have been so many rumors, sworn testimonies and first-hand accounts of the editrix leaving Condé Nast that sometimes it seems like she’s hanging on there just to spite the morning’s headlines.

But recently, the magazine departure watchdogs have had a new person of interest: BusinessWeek.com‘s editor-in-chief John Byrne. Except this time, the gossipers were right. Turns out, Byrne is leaving the Bloomberg LP-owned business magazine to launch a digital media company in San Francisco.

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The Experts Weigh In On Condé Nast Closures

4 times square.jpgIn the day following the news that Condé Nast has decided to shutter four magazines, including Gourmet and Cookie, we reached out to some experts in the field to get their reactions. Here’s what we’ve heard:

“It made sense for a company that had two rival magazines to close one of them. It has been a very competitive year for magazines in the epicurean category, and we have had a lot of success. But Gourmet saw newsstand sales fall by 25 percent.”

Merri Lee Kingsly, publisher of Gourmet rival Saveur

“Seeing a major media company like Condé Nast blindly shutting down four prominent publications without even trying to first migrate them to digital is a prime example of how out of touch many media companies are. Folding Gourmet, a magazine with over six decades of a strong readership, is the ultimate proof that the management of Condé Nast is very short-sighted when it comes to understanding the opportunities that exist within the digital publishing landscape. This is truly a sad day for magazines. I have this to say to all print publishers: Don’t kill off another publication! We have the opportunity reshape our industry with digital publishing. Major media companies need to have the vision to realize this.”

Jim Gaines, former editor at Life, Time and People, and current editor-in-chief of digital media company FLYP

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Nikki Finke Blasts New Yorker Profile

 deadline logo.jpgYesterday, The New Yorker published a lengthy profile of Deadline Hollywood Daily blogger Nikki Finke.

The article — which name-checks some of the biggest players in Hollywood, muses on Finke’s possible sources, describes her home office and even gets the woman of the hour on the record — is woven through with an interesting discourse about the state of journalism and reporting on Hollywood in the Internet age and Finke’s own method:

“Finke’s code is the Hollywood code. She is for hard work, big box-office, stars who remain loyal to their agents and publicists, and the little guy — until, that is, the big guy chats her up. Then she’s for that big guy until some other big guy calls to stick it to the first big guy. And this, too, is the Hollywood code: relationships are paramount but provisional. One executive observes that people who heed Finke’s call to snark about their competitors shouldn’t get too comfortable: ‘The idea is, The lion won’t eat me if I throw it another Christian. It works for a day, but you’re going back to the Colosseum soon.’”

Almost immediately, Finke posted her take on the article: a blistering take-down of the New Yorker, pointing out that the piece “didn’t lay a glove on me.” Finke said writer Tad Friend was “easy to manipulate,” and claimed she bitchslapped editor-in-chief David Remnick, “especially during the very slipshod factchecking process.” She had made the venerable magazine her “buttboy” — a favorite phrase of hers.

The article is also missing some key information on Deadline Hollywood Daily, such as how much Finke is said to have received when she sold her site to Jay Penske‘s Mail.com Media Corp. earlier this year or recent plans to expand the site. All Things Digital’s Peter Kafka is on the case, asking questions about why Finke has still has not named a New York correspondent she had planned to appoint around the end of the summer:

“For the record, in late June, Finke said she’d have a New York correspondent hired within three months; four weeks ago, Penske told me said correspondent was going to be signed within two weeks. What’s the status now? ‘Not ready to comment right now,’ Finke says via email.”

We’re getting restless waiting to see who Finke will chose to lead her East Coast division. There’s certainly no one who could match her brutal style and flippant attitude. But we’d like to see them try.

Call MeThe New Yorker

Hollywood Manipulated The New Yorker –Deadline Hollywood Daily

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