TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Philip K. Dick’

Rolling Stone Wonders About Google Glass

It’s not quite the futuristic picture painted in Steven Spielberg‘s 2002 adaptation of Phillip K. Dick short story “The Minority Report.” But it’s pretty close:

A world where everyone on the street is instantly uploading to YouTube whatever they’re looking at will be a world where everyone is both continuously filming and being filmed, where everyone is both voyeur and object.

In a thought-provoking Rolling Stone blog post, Gary Susman touches all the relevant recent media bases – S.T. VanAirsdale‘s Tribeca Film essay, a photo of Michele Bachman tweeted by Luke Russert and the musings of documentary filmmaker Henry Alex-Rubin (Murderball).

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Freelancing 101 Online Boot Camp

Freelancing 101Starting April 28, this online event will show you the best way to start your freelancing career, from the first steps of self-advertising and marketing, to building your schedule and managing clients. By the end of this online boot camp you will have a plan for making a profitable career as a freelancer, and the skill set to devote yourself to it. Register now! 

Philip K. Dick’s Estate Sues Adjustment Bureau Filmmakers

The estate of the great science fiction writer Philip K. Dick is suing the makers of the 2011 Matt Damon film Adjustment Bureau–which was based on Dick’s 1953 story “The Adjustment Team.” Dick’s estate wants millions in back-end royalties from the film. Meanwhile, the film’s distribution company, Media Rights Capital, seems to think, despite already having a deal in place with Dick’s estate, the story is in the public domain.

THR, Esq. has the story:

The suit, filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles, claims Nolfi approached the estate in 2001 seeking rights to The Adjustment Team, Dick’s 1953 story about a group of men who “adjust” the lives of ordinary citizens. The estate agreed to license the story at a “bargain” rate of $25,000 per year, but in exchange, Nolfi said he would make “substantial payments” to the trust if the movie ever happened. These payments totalled several million dollars when budget and box office bonuses are factored in, according to the suit.

Read more