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Posts Tagged ‘PhotoShop’

Cosmopolitan EIC: We ‘Cannot Win’ the Photoshop Game

Adweek has posted video from its recent event “A Candid Conversation With Five Women Leaders of Advertising and Media.” Among the clips is this fascinating snippet from Cosmopolitan EIC Joanna Coles.

Coles recalls that when she was at Marie Claire, no one believed her when the magazine ran a cover and photo spread of Jessica Simpson with no make-up or retouching. “They accused us of lying,” she said. “The one time we did it [no retouching], no one believed us.”

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Netflix Soars | AP Bans Photoshopper | Layoffs at TiVo

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Netflix’s Momentum Continues With 2.33 Million New U.S. Customers in Q4 (The Verge)
Netflix revealed its fourth quarter earnings Wednesday, capping off a banner year that saw the streaming service surpass HBO in subscriber count and earn critical acclaim for its original programming. In Q4, the company handily beat Wall Street expectations with revenue of $1.18 billion and earnings per share of $0.79. During the same period last year (before viewers had streamed a single episode of House of Cards), Netflix earned 13 cents per share on revenue of $945 million. Bloomberg Businessweek Netflix said Wednesday that it expects to sign up another 2.25 million subscribers in the first quarter, with “years of member growth ahead of us,” according to a company letter to shareholders. Netflix shares soared nearly 18 percent in trading after the market’s close, following a 1.5 percent gain to $333.73 in the regular session. NYT The strong growth came even though the service did not add a prominent, exclusive program like the drama House of Cards. One new animated series, TurboFAST, was introduced and the quarter contained the second season of the service’s initial drama series, Lilyhammer. But Netflix did maintain much of its media momentum by being prominently mentioned in award nominations and end-of-the-year best lists. The Guardian Netflix has been experimenting with different subscriber options including different streaming offerings and a lower-priced $6.99 plan for new U.S. customers to get a single stream of standard definition video. On a call with analysts Reed Hastings, chief executive officer, said eventually he would like to have “three simple options to fit everyone’s taste”. He said the company had no plans to run advertising, as does rival Hulu.

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Self Editor Defends Kelly Clarkson Photoshopping

self.pngYep, Kelly Clarkson‘s cover shot for this month’s Self was Photoshopped, says Editor-in-Chief Lucy Danzinger. So what?

What some took to be Self‘s attempt to hide Clarkson’s curvy frame Danzinger simply defended as commonplace clean-up. In a blog post yesterday, Danzinger said the retouching to Clarkson’s photo was simply meant to enhance the beauty of the shot and sell magazines, not detract from Clarkson’s “amazing spirit” and “contagious confidence.”

Here’s how she described the post-production process that follows every cover shot:

“[W]e edit the film and choose the best pictures. This is done in tandem with the star; the creative director, Cindy Searight; the photographer; and myself. Then we allow the postproduction process to happen, where we mark up the photograph to correct any awkward wrinkles in the blouse, flyaway hair and other things that might detract from the beauty of the shot. This is art, creativity and collaboration. It’s not, as in a news photograph, journalism. It is, however, meant to inspire women to want to be their best. That is the point.”

We understand the need to clean up wrinkles and flyaway hair, but Clarkson’s photo seems to have helped the pop star shed some pounds. Although she didn’t say exactly what was edited on Clarkson, Danzinger stood by the picture’s accuracy. Or rather, she said the accuracy didn’t really matter for a cover photo.

“Did we alter her appearance? Only to make her look her personal best,” Danzinger said. “Did we publish an act of fiction? No. Not unless you think all photos are that.”

What do you think? How far is too far when it comes to Photoshopping — for cover photos and other photos as well? Do you think cover photographs are journalism?

Pictures that please us Lucy’s Blog

Times Addresses Photoshopping Faux Pas

slideshow.pngYesterday, there was news that The New York Times had removed an online photo gallery from its Web site due to allegations that the photos had been digitally altered. Today, the story is still developing.

Late yesterday, the Times added more information to their editor’s note accompanying the removed gallery. According to the updated note, the original introduction to the photo feature, which appeared in the magazine last Sunday as well as online as a slide show, explicitly said that photographer Edgar Martins “creates his images with long exposures but without digital manipulation.” However, despite the paper’s claims, the photos did end up being manipulated. As the editor’s note explains:

“A reader, however, discovered on close examination that one of the pictures was digitally altered, apparently for aesthetic reasons. Editors later confronted the photographer and determined that most of the images did not wholly reflect the reality they purported to show. Had the editors known that the photographs had been digitally manipulated, they would not have published the picture essay, which has been removed from NYTimes.com.”

Today, the Times Lens blog has a longer explanation about the incident. The blog reveals that the Times does not accept any types of digital manipulation in the photos that it publishes — except for cropping. (We wonder if this same policy applies to fashion photographs in the Style section or T magazine.)

So we’re still left wondering. Why did Martins do it?