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Posts Tagged ‘pitching’

Senior Editor of MAD on Pitching the Magazine

JoeRaiolaJoe Raiola has a job many covet, and few could imagine: He’s one of a handful of full-timers in charge of MAD magazine. He’s also created one of only two officially sanctioned John Lennon tribute concerts. Along with his radio appearances and stand up comedy work, Raiola has been with MAD magazine for 28 years. He insists that working there shouldn’t be considered a proper job: “If you mature, you get fired. It’s a place where you stay perpetually young or silly or both.”

In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do?, Raiola talks about The Beatles’ MAD connection, the atmosphere at mag’s headquarters and his first pitching experience:

What advice do you have for readers interested in pitching MAD?
MAD has always been freelance written. We’re always looking for new talent and new writers. Pitching stuff to us now is pretty easy; you can do it via our website. And we’re actually foolish enough to review everything that comes in. Writers don’t need to include illustrations. When I sold to MAD for the first time in 1984, I didn’t have any skills as an artist at all. I suggested a couple of art notes and had some ideas as to how I thought something could be done, but that was about it.

To learn more about Raiola, including info on his upcoming performance in New York, read: So What Do You Do: Joe Raiola, MAD Senior Editor and John Lennon Tribute Executive Producer?

Mediabistro Course

Pitch Your Magazine Article

Pitch Your Magazine ArticleStarting October 1, learn how to write queries for magazines and websites! In this course, you'll learn how to write and send an effective pitch, generate pitch letters, research outlets for your articles, and follow-up with editors to ensure that your queries get results. Register now! 

Land $2 a Word for Innovative Articles at AARP

AARP The Magazine, one of the most successful magazines for the over 50 set, is looking for freelancers who have something meaningful to say. And despite their older clientele, the magazine is not only published in print, but also on tablets and online.

AARP has an enormous readership (its circulation is 22 million, yet it reaches an astounding 34 million people). Even better news: 60 percent of their content comes from freelance writers. Marilyn Milloy, deputy editor, explains the magazine’s mission:

Our greater mission is to redefine aging in America by showing that attitude, aspiration and actions are more relevant to quality of life than how old you are,” she said. “We don’t have direct competitors, but magazines in our competitive set would include Reader’s Digest, More, Prevention and Money. We overlap with all of them. But we’re unique because of our size and our laser focus on people over 50. These are the people who most matter to us, so we show their images and offer content based on where they are in their lives — whether it’s advising how to get the most from their healthcare dollars, their work, their travel or their grocery shopping.

For editors contact info and pitching etiquette, read How To Pitch: AARP The Magazine.

Aneya Fernando

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

How Lola Ogunnaike Snagged Big Time Bylines

While Lola Ogunnaike has interviewed First  Lady Michelle Obama for BET and been a regular contributor for Today and MSNBC, her first love is writing, with her byline appearing in the pages of Rolling StoneVibeNew YorkElle and Glamour.

So what does it take to land those coveted cover stories time and time again? Cultivating strong relationships with editors, she says in mediabistro.com’s So What Do You Do? interview.

“One of the key things is to make sure they know who you are. That can be as simple as asking them out for coffee or tea or asking them out to dinner and offering to pay for both of those things, which is very important.”

Don’t think once you’ve got your story in, you’re done. “It’s also just following up with a link to a story that you may have written, something as simple as ‘You may not have gotten the chance to see my New York Times piece in the style section; thought you may be interested in this.’ What I found in my years in the industry is that most people don’t follow up. So, if you actually do, then that puts you head and shoulders above the pack.”

Read the full interview.