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Posts Tagged ‘Popular Science’

Cliff Ransom Named Editor of Popular Science

Cliff Ransom has been promoted to editor-in-chief of Popular Science. Ransom most recently served executive editor of Popular Science since February 2011.

“Cliff’s creative vision for Popular Science, his extensive experience in magazine media, and his background as a scientist make him the ideal choice to lead this brand into the future,” said Anthony Licata, editorial director of Bonnier Men’s Group, in a statement. “Cliff is already the driving force behind many of Popular Science’s most innovative and successful stories and editorial programs, and I can’t wait to see where he takes the brand next.”

Ransom’s appointment is effective immediately.

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Popular Science Tweaks No-Comments Policy [Update]

Perhaps the outcry was larger than expected. Popular Science editor-in-chief Jacob Ward doesn’t really offer an explanation.

PopularScienceBlogNetwork

But with the announcement of a new Popular Science blog network, he throws in a major caveat:

A couple weeks before launching this network, we announced a new no-comments policy on the site. It was the result of a combination of factors: a rising tide of unpleasant comments, a growing body of evidence that those unpleasant comments, left unchecked, can have a disastrous effect on scientific comprehension, and a lack of resources to properly moderate the comments to ensure that the resulting discussion is productive.

Here, we’re giving our bloggers the option of turning comments on for individual posts, and asking them to actively lead the discussion. We hope you’ll take part.

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YouTube Takes Steps to Filter Out Offensive Comments

The public reaction to Popular Science choosing to turn off website reader comments is split. For those who think it was a poor resolution, the simultaneous approach of YouTube this week will no doubt be most welcome.

Per NYC-based Gizmodo contributor Brent Rose, the Google-owned behemoth is moving to try and control its own wild flow of conversation beneath the embedded videos. Various steps include offering Google+ users “private” conversation options and giving publishers a range of filters:

Currently, content creators can choose to allow all comments in, turn off commenting completely or manually approve each comment. For big channels that garner millions of views a week, it isn’t possible to go through every comment that comes in — but now, YouTube is introducing filters that will make it easier.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: PopSci Kills Comments | @Horse_ebooks Exposed | New Reuters Editor Named


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Why We’re Shutting Off Our Comments (Popular Science)
Comments can be bad for science. That’s why, here at PopularScience.com, we’re shutting them off. It wasn’t a decision we made lightly. As the news arm of a 141-year-old science and technology magazine, we are as committed to fostering lively, intellectual debate as we are to spreading the word of science far and wide. The problem is when trolls and spambots overwhelm the former, diminishing our ability to do the latter. The Atlantic Like a narrow Supreme Court opinion, PopSci‘s defense was case-specific, without presuming to tell other sites they should follow along. Comments “erode the popular consensus” on scientifically validated topics, Suzanne LaBarre, PopSci‘s online content director wrote, such as climate change and evolution. It’s perfectly legal to wonder aloud on your Facebook page whether dinosaur bones are real or placed there by a spiritual entity to test our faith. But it’s not quite the discussion a site like PopSci wants to cultivate under a column by a world-renowned paleontologist. The Washington Post / ComPost End the comments! For civilization! They’re finally doing it. No more comments. Popular Science has just announced that it is putting the kibosh on the comments. And it can’t come soon enough. paidContent I’m tempted to argue that it’s also bad for science when you jump to conclusions based on very little evidence, or when you close off potential avenues for informed debate that might help your reporting, but there’s a bit more to it. FishbowlNY It’s hard to argue with her, but we’re sure someone, somewhere, really wants to.

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Popular Science Ends Comments

Popular Science has had it with morons. In an effort to curb people from posting idiotic, rude and over-the-top comments on its site, the magazine has eliminated the option.

“Comments can be bad for science,” wrote PopSci’s online content director, Suzanne LaBarre. “That’s why, here at PopularScience.com, we’re shutting them off.”

LaBarre continues:

A politically motivated, decades-long war on expertise has eroded the popular consensus on a wide variety of scientifically validated topics. Everything, from evolution to the origins of climate change, is mistakenly up for grabs again. Scientific certainty is just another thing for two people to ‘debate’ on television. And because comments sections tend to be a grotesque reflection of the media culture surrounding them, the cynical work of undermining bedrock scientific doctrine is now being done beneath our own stories, within a website devoted to championing science.

It’s hard to argue with her, but we’re sure someone, somewhere, really wants to.

Forecast the Future for Popular Science

Are you interested in things that are ‘hard, fast, and shiny?” If spaceships and supercars are your thing, you might think about pitching to Popular Science. This mag is freelancer-friendly (75 percent of its content is written by freelancers!) and is always looking for news from around the corner. After all, their motto is, “the future now.”

“The one central tenet of our magazine is that it’s a really relentlessly optimistic magazine,” said editor-in-chief Jacob Ward. “We believe that technology and science are gonna make the future better than it is today.” So, if you’ve got a scoop on the next innovation that will save us from the apocalypse, better pitch it before anyone else does.

Read more in How To Pitch: Popular Science. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Forecast the Future for Popular Science

Are you interested in things that are ‘hard, fast, and shiny?” If spaceships and supercars are your thing, you might think about pitching to Popular Science. This mag is freelancer-friendly (75 percent of its content is written by freelancers!) and is always looking for news from around the corner. After all, their motto is, “the future now.”

“The one central tenet of our magazine is that it’s a really relentlessly optimistic magazine,” said editor-in-chief Jacob Ward. “We believe that technology and science are gonna make the future better than it is today.” So, if you’ve got a scoop on the next innovation that will save us from the apocalypse, better pitch it before anyone else does.

Read more in How To Pitch: Popular Science. [Mediabistro AvantGuild subscription required]

Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Fallout from ESPN-FM Deal: Syndicated Tom Joyner (left) and Michael Baisden Fight Back Without KISS, New York Outlet, May 1
  2. New York Wins ASME ‘Best Cover’ of 2011 Award, May 3
  3. Time Inc. Experiences a Rough First Quarter, May 2
  4. Sports Illustrated Dedicates Issue to Title IX, May 2
  5. Jacob Ward Promoted to EIC of Popular Science, May 1
  6. New York Daily News Hires Web Editor, May 2

Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Jacob Ward Promoted to EIC of Popular Science

Jacob Ward has been promoted from West Coast Bureau Chief to Editor-in-Chief of Popular Science. Ward had been the bureau chief since 2010, but has been with the magazine since 2006. Ward succeeds Editorial Director Mark Jannot, who joined RDA Milwaukee, a subdivision of Readers’ Digest Association.

“Jake Ward is the perfect choice to lead Popular Science into the future,” said Bonnier Technology Group Vice President and Group Publisher, Steven Grune. “During his time with the magazine, he has elevated the brand’s stature in the consumer and advertising marketplace, and he embodies the technology savvy qualities that our audience values. Jake is ‘The Future Now’ and will successfully move the brand into the next generation.”

Ward will now split his time between the New York and San Francisco offices of Popular Science.

Adweek Unveils Annual Hot List Next Week; CBS and MTV Early Winners

New York-based Adweek has named the finalists for this year’s Hot List. For the first time, the list expands from best in magazines to include television, print, and digital banners.

The winners will be revealed next week, but FishbowlNY has learned exclusively about several of the honorees.

CBS has been chosen for the Hottest Drama on broadcast television, while ABC has been awarded for the Hottest Comedy. On cable, MTV was picked for Hottest Reality show. Adweek does not reveal the hottest shows by name.

In digital, the Hottest Celebrity Website is TMZ. Spotify is taking home two awards: Hottest Startup and Streaming Web. Zynga is selected as Hottest Gaming Company.

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