TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Portfolio’

Roth Returns To Fortune To Lead Web Site

Daniel_Roth.jpgFortune magazine has tapped veteran business reporter, and former Fortune staffer, Daniel Roth to lead its Web site through an upcoming revamp, in the newly created position of managing editor of Fortune.com.

In a memo to staff today, Fortune managing editor Andy Serwer explained that Roth would be heading up the magazine’s plan to “reinvent Fortune.com within the framework of its home on CNNMoney.com,” as part of “the reformulation of the whole Fortune franchise,” which has been talked about for some time.

Roth left the Time Inc. pub in 2006 to joined the now-defunct Portfolio at Condé Nast. He is currently working as a senior writer at Wired, which he joined in 2007.

Serwer’s memo, after the jump

Read more: Fortune Tackles its Website Again, With a High Profile Hire –All Things D

Previously: Wired Steals Roth From Portfolio, As Business Magazines Struggle, Fortune Revamps

Read more

Mediabistro Course

The Art of the Book Review

The Art of the Book ReviewStarting August 4, learn how to get paid to write reviews that will influence the publishing landscape! Taught by a Publishers Weekly book critic, you'll learn how to recommend a book to its audience, write reviews of varying lengths, tailor a review to a specific publication and more! Register now!

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: A Timeline Of Magazine Closings

taylor_swift_blender_cover-x622200.jpgIt’s been a tough year for the publishing industry, and magazines in particular have had it rough. Every major publisher has had to shutter at least one of its titles, and some of our favorite glossies have gone to that great magazine rack in the sky.

While it would take forever to list all the over 400 magazines that have folded this year, we here at FishbowlNY put together a timeline of some of the bigger names that were shuttered this year. The bad news? It looks like in the last six months of the year the number of titles snowballed. Here’s hoping that 2010 looks a lot brighter.

After the jump, our timeline

Read more

FishbowlNY Readers Respond: Gourmet Saddest Closing in 2009

gourmetmag111.jpgLast week we asked readers, “What print title will you miss the most” after the year full of closures?

The response was indisputable: Gourmet magazine, the award-winning epicurean title published by Condé Nast that was closed along with three other magazines in October, was far and away your number one choice, coming in with 28 percent of your votes.

Coming in second was Domino, also a Condé title, while Portfolio and the recently shuttere demise of Editor & Publisher jostled for points with nine and eight percent of your votes, respectively.

Regional papers like The Washington Blade, The Baltimore Examiner, and The Rocky Mountain News apparently only affected those living where the paper was distributed, since they got the least amount of votes, although ironically in that same pile is Fortune Small Business, which only two percent of FishbowlNY readers were sad to see go.

Previously: Breaking: Condé Shutters Four Magazines: Cookie, Gourmet, Two Bridal Titles, Could E&P Have Been Saved?, Conde Nast Shutters Domino

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: New York Media’s Biggest Business Decisions

4 times square.jpgNew York is home to some of the biggest media companies in the country, like Condé Nast, The New York Times Co., News Corp., Hearst and Time Warner, just to name a few.

This year, those companies were imperiled, struggling to survive like many other companies around the world. But as print media disputed declarations that its days were numbered, these once-great companies that made their money from print pubs were fighting hard to keep their heads above water. In order to do that they made some decisions — like bringing in new investors, closing publications and selling them off. It was in no way a big year for media deals, but there were a few. Below, our list of the biggest business stories to come out of the New York media world this year.

Bloomberg LP Buys BusinessWeek

After seeking a buyer for BusinessWeek for most of the fall, publisher McGraw-Hill finally cut a deal with Bloomberg LP, which snapped up the magazine in October. The result? Bloomberg BusinessWeek, a new vision of the mag that has a new editor and a smaller staff.

After the jump, Carlos Slim invests in the Times, classical music and the Comcast-NBCU deal.

Read more

WSJ. Magazine Booms Despite Tough Market

wsj_c3333over.jpgIt may be a terrible year for the print industry, with diminishing ad sales forcing magazines to scale back on the number of issues and pages they can afford, but at least one magazine is claiming that they’re doing better than ever.

The Wall Street Journal‘s one-year-old magazine, WSJ. (can’t forget that unnecessary period!) will begin printing six issues a year instead of its traditional quarterly print run, starting in March of next year. In addition, the glossy’s circulation will almost double from its current 800,000 subscribers to 1.5 million.

“The magazine speaks directly to the world’s most discerning consumers about the people, places and products that matter most to them,” saied WSJ. editor-in-chief Tina Gaudoin, who is perhaps forgetting the lessons learned this year in the closing of haute business and lifestyle titles like Trump Magazine, Portfolio, and Fortune Small Business.

Then again, The Wall Street Journal has managed to make itself an exception to every industry rule this year and is still expanding, so perhaps some of that luck will rub off on WSJ.

Full press release after the jump.

Previously: Tina Gaudoin To Edit WSJ Lifestyle Magazine

Read more

What Titles Were You Sad To Lose In 2009?

gourmet.jpgIt hasn’t been the easiest year for print journalism. Crain’s New York Business reported Friday that 367 magazines have been axed in the last 12 months, with 64 going online-only, according to preliminary numbers from online database Mediafinder.com. (In October, Mediafinder said 383 had already closed up shop during the first nine months for the year).

According to The Business Insider, by July over 105 newspapers received similar treatment. Many more have had to scale back or go to an almost entirely digital format to survive.

In early October, Condé Nast took a particularly brutal hit with the shuttering of four titles: Gourmet, Cookie, Modern Bride, and Elegant Bride. And those closures came months after Condé folded Domino and Portfolio earlier in the year.

Still, it could have been worse…The New York Times is still around, despite some pessimistic predictions, right? So we here at FishbowlNY would like to hear from our readers: which closing affected you the most? Feel free to add your own to our list, and remember, we’re sticking to print publications (RIP Jossip.com) that disappeared in 2009, not including any that went online-only. And pass it along to your friends — we’ll be taking your answers into consideration next week, when we feature some year-end lists handpicked by the FishbowlNY editors. What can we say, it’s that time of year.


What print title will you miss the most?(trends)

Read More: 367 magazines shuttered in 2009Crain’s

Previously: Breaking: Condé Shutters Four Magazines: Cookie, Gourmet, Two Bridal Titles, Report: More Than 100 Magazines Shuttered In Last Three Months

Newsday, Observer Name New Editors

Debby Krenek.jpgIt’s a Friday afternoon a few weeks before the end of the year, but that hasn’t stopped two New York-area papers from announcing moves at the tops of their mastheads.

The latest editor of The New York Observer, Kyle Pope, named Christopher Stewart the paper’s deputy editor, according to a memo obtained by Romenesko. The two formerly worked together at Portfolio magazine, where Pope was one of two top editors and Stewart was a contributing editor. Pope was named editor of Observer last month.

Also today, Long Island newspaper Newsday announced a changing of the guard atop its masthead, as managing editor and senior VP of digital media Debby Krenek (pictured) was picked to succeed editor-in-chief John Mancini, who resigned.

Cablevision-owned Newsday‘s former publisher Tim Knight, resigned in September, with Terry Jiminez, the publisher of amNY, which is also owned by Cablevision, stepping in to replace him.

Full release about Krenek, after the jump

Christopher Stewart named NYO deputy editor –Romenesko

Read more

Observer Exec Editor Leaves To Join McGeveran Venture

observer.jpgTwo weeks after The New York Observer‘s top editor Tom McGeveran announced that he was leaving the paper at the end of the year to work on some mysterious new venture, the pub’s executive editor Josh Benson has said he will be leaving as well.

Politico reports that Benson will also be leaving The Observer by the end of the year to join McGeveran in his new project, although details about it remain unclear. (We can’t wait to find out what it is.)

As Michael Calderone points out, much of the old guard has changed at the Jared Kushner-owned paper this year, with longtime editor Peter Kaplan‘s departure in May and layoffs in June. Last week, Kushner named former Portfolio editor Kyle Pope to the top editor spot, replacing McGeveran.

NYO exec editor Benson leaving –Politico

Earlier: Former Portfolio Editor To Lead Observer

Condé Nast Digital’s Schutte: We’re Not A Late Bloomer

conde333.jpgToday Folio magazine posted an interview with Drew Schutte, senior vice president and chief revenue officer of Condé Nast Digital, about the direction of Condé Nast online and the future of the publishing company.

Unsurprisingly, Schutte was defensive about Folio‘s assertion that Si Newhouse‘s titles have been late to adapt to the whole World Wide Web thing. At the same time, Schutte’s reassertion of the old Condé adage that the Internet will never replace magazines and that any digital content is merely a “supplement” to the print product is really starting to sound stale, considering the major losses Condé’s print editions have suffered lately.

Read on for some key points from Schutte’s interview

Read more

Kushner Sought Sorkin For Observer Post|Thomson Reuters Says No To Print|Playboy Updates|NYT Corrects FNC-Related Headline|How To Survive A Layoff

Daily Intel: New York Observer owner Jared Kushner twice asked New York Times business reporter wunderkind Andrew Ross Sorkin to be editor of the paper. Looks like he settled for Portfolio‘s Kyle Pope instead.

Reuters: Thomson Reuters is not interested is getting into the print media game, says CEO Tom Glocer.

Folio: Playboy is working on ways to keep the magazine alive, with plans in the works for a joint venture in the development of a new business model for the company and more cost cutting initiatives on the horizon.

Mediaite: The New York Times issued a correction on a headline about a story on Fox News Channel‘s election night ratings, just to clear up any insinuation about the channel’s political bias.

The Business Insider: How to survive a media layoff.

NEXT PAGE >>