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Posts Tagged ‘ProPublica’

Paul Steiger to Step Down as EIC/CEO of ProPublica

The New York Times is reporting that Paul Steiger is stepping down as Editor-in-Chief and CEO of ProPublica in January. Steiger is going to take on the role of Executive Chairman, and Stephen Engelberg, currently the site’s Managing Editor, will succeed him. Additionally, Richard Tofel, ProPublica’s General Manager, will become President. Both Engelberg and Tofel will share the CEO role.

Steiger is moving on because he believes in Engelberg and Tofel, but also because ProPublica — which launched in 2008 — is on solid ground. “It seems like the right time, and, in addition, I have two colleagues who are totally ready to take over,” Steiger explained to the Times. “The message is getting across, more people understand why for this kind of journalism, part of the solution needs to come from philanthropy.”

Each change takes effect on January 1, 2013.

Stephen Engelberg Named to Pulitzer Board

Stephen Engelberg, ProPublica’s Managing Editor, has been named to the Pulitzer Prize Board. Engelberg has been ProPublica’s Managing Editor since the non-profit site launched in 2008.

During his tenure at ProPublica, the site won the first Pulitzer ever awarded for a series that didn’t originate in print.

Prior to ProPublica, Engelberg worked The New York Times for 18 years and The Oregonian, among other places.

ProPublica Brings on Social Media Producer

ProPublica has hired Blair Hickman as its new social media producer. Hickman is the former senior editor at Dowser Media where she was in charge of online strategy, user research and shaping solutions journalism.

Hickman will assist social media editor Daniel Victor and starts January 23.

“Blair is inspired in her thinking and dogged in her execution,” Victor said. “She’ll bring a fresh, smart voice to our social media accounts, and her understanding of how to use social strategies throughout the newsroom will be valuable to everyone here.”

ProPublica Wins First Digital Only Pulitzer

While all the Pulitzer winners deserve recognition, FishbowlNY wanted to highlight ProPublica.org, which won the first Pulitzer awarded for a series that didn’t originate in print. Read that sentence again, because this is huge news.

As we just mentioned in the last post, ProPublica writers Jake Bernstein and Jesse Eisinger won the Pulitzer for National Reporting  for their look at how some Wall Street banks and hedge funds made the financial crisis worse. The fact that their pieces never appeared in print means that digital only publications are breaking new ground and getting respected like never before.

From all digital pubs to ProPublica, Bernstein and Eisinger – thanks for kicking the door down.

Six Finalists Announced For Investigative Reporting Prize

twitter-logo22.jpgOn March 23, one group of intrepid reporters will be winning $25,000 for the 2010 Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. The six finalists announced today come from such varied locales and media as KHOU-TV in Houston, The Boston Globe, and ProPublica. Being a finalist carries a $10,000 award. Who says that journalism doesn’t pay?

According to the Harvard Kennedy School of Government’s Web site, the goal of the Goldsmith prize is to “recognize and encourage journalism which promotes more effective and ethical conduct of government, the making of public policy, or the practice of politics by disclosing excessive secrecy, impropriety and mismanagement, or instances of particularly commendable government performance.”

See the full list of winners after the jump.

Read More: Shorenstein Center Announces Book Prize Winners and Finalists for the 2010 Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting — Harvard Kennedy School

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2010 Trends: Non-Profit Journalism Takes On Investigative Work

notebook.jpgWhen our friends at Folio magazine asked us to contribute to their compilation of media predictions for 2010, we knew we had to include something about non-profit journalism organizations. Here’s part of what we said:

“Media companies will also be looking to partner up in order to pool resources and keep costs low. Non-profit journalism organizations and Web sites that rely on citizen journalism are a good place for traditional media to look for partners.”

Of course, we were thinking of sites like ProPublica, which we wrote about yesterday with respect to its use of crowdsourcing. And long-standing non-profit news organizations like NPR and PBS continue to expand their hyperlocal coverage and online presence. But 2009 also saw the launch a few big non-profit journalism ventures, like The Texas Tribune and The Huffington Post Investigative Fund. They’re poised to grow in the coming year and may become an important part of the media dialogue.

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ProPublica Demonstrates The Benefits Of Crowdsourcing

propublica loan mod.jpgNow on to crowdsourcing, which is more than just asking your Twitter friends for restaurant recommendations. It can also be a helpful tool for journalism, wherein reporters cull information and data from groups of people on the ground and in the know.

Perhaps one of the best examples of crowdsourcing was The Huffington Post‘s 2008 “Off The Bus” election coverage, and this year nonprofit investigative news org ProPublica tapped that project’s mastermind, Amanda Michel to lead their own crowdsourcing efforts.

Now, ProPublica is using crowdsourcing to gather information for a number of projects, including tracking the government’s various stimulus projects around the country and keeping tabs on the national load modification program. ProPublica reporter Paul Kiel is heading the loan mod project, and he spoke to FishbowlNY about the stories that have come out of their crowdsourced questionnaire and how crowdsourcing can be used as a tool by traditional news organizations.

Kiel said ProPublica’s loan mod crowdsourcing project started soon after the program launched, around May of this year. The organization posted a short questionnaire, asking readers whether they tried to apply for loan modifications and what their experiences were. “We’ve had about 300 responses over the last few months,” he explained. “We keep tabs on it and get in touch with people from time to time. It’s led to about two dozen stories, and I’ve used people who we’ve gotten through our crowdsourcing as sources for those stories.”

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How Citizen Journalism Helps A Story Live On

Gaines_Jim.jpgAs we cover the media trends we’re looking forward to in 2010, today we’re focusing on citizen journalism and crowdsourcing — two similar concepts that promote engagement between reporters and people involved in the stories they’re covering.

To get us started on this topic, we spoke to Jim Gaines, the former managing editor at People, Time and Life magazines and current editor-in-chief of digital publication FLYP, about the possibilities of citizen journalism and the future of journalistic storytelling.

Gaines is a big proponent of using journalism to start a conversation, and using collaboration from readers to continue that conversation and coverage of a story. Although his own pub FLYP doesn’t have the infrastructure in place yet to accomplish his vision, Gaines thinks collaboration is the wave of the future.

“I think 2010 is going to be enormously important as a turning point for digital publishing in general, citizen journalism in particular, because the facility — and by that I don’t just mean the software and hardware, I mean the culture and other supportive elements — are just getting into place,” Gaines told us.

“Google Wave is a wonderful example of a collaboration, but there are so few people on it that it has no scale. I think that it is an interesting model for the storytelling of the future, which is not going to be a one-way story told. A story is going to be the beginning of a conversation and that story will be modified by the conversation that follows. I don’t know exactly what that model is going to look like because the experimentation is only beginning. But it’s very exciting.”

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Feminist Press Honors Huffington|Mother Jones Focuses On Climate Change|More On The Vanity Fair Layoffs|Latina‘s Special Mexico Issue Brings In Ads

GalleyCat: Arianna Huffington was among the women honored by the Feminist Press at its 39th Annual Women Write the World Gala last night.

BayNewser: Mother Jones is gathering a group of publications to work collectively to report on climate change. The group may eventually include Slate, Grist, The Atlantic, Wired, ProPublica and the Center for Investigative Reporting.

Gawker/The Awl: Where was Graydon Carter during yesterday’s Vanity Fair layoffs? Could he possibly have been on a private jet to Bermuda? And more dirt on the VF cuts: more than 80 percent of those let go were women.

Folio: Latina magazine’s Mexico-themed special issue drew the attention of advertisers like Sephora, resulting in a 6 percent increase in additional revenue for the issue.

CJR Panel: Is Web Journalism Profitable?

ccc.jpgYesterday, the Columbia Journalism Review held a conference entitled “Beyond the Newsroom: Traditional journalistic skills in a nontraditional world” with panelists Michael Calderone from Politico, David Banks of Civic Venture and Encore.org), New School professor and former Associated Press correspondent Clara Hemphill, Charles Sennott of The Global Post and Paul Steiger of ProPublica.

So with these veteran reporters speaking about new media endeavors, did anyone produce a new perspective on web journalism or its potential lucrativeness?

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