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Posts Tagged ‘Psychology Today’

Reporter Cracks Up as Harold Ramis Explains Movie’s Psychology Today Connection

HaroldRamisSheridanRoadMag_FeaturedIn 2009, not long after historic preservation foundation Landmarks Illinois celebrated former Chicago Tribune messenger boy Harold Ramis along with Cubs great Ernie Banks and Chicago marathon founder Lee Flaherty, the filmmaker spoke with Jake Jarvi for a subsequent article in Sheridan Road magazine. Perusing the interviews conducted over the years by Ramis, who passed away today at age 69, this one stands out not so much for what’s on the page but rather because of the Web version’s inclusion of audio of additional, unpublished conversation snippets.

In the five-minute segment, Ramis repeatedly has Jarvi in stitches, starting with a recollection of how he got his first Hollywood agent and how a Psychology Today article inspired one of his films:

“Travel is not necessarily about relaxing. It can be a real hassle. I did a whole movie about that once, Club Paradise.”

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Cover Battle: Psychology Today or Sports Illustrated

Welcome back to another edition of FishbowlNY’s weekly Cover Battle. This time around Psychology Today takes on Sports Illustrated. PT went with a cover that daringly explores the taboo subject of Lone Ranger sex play. In this romping roleplay, yelling “Hi-yo Silver! Away!” takes on a whole new meaning and no one ever — ever — wants to be Tonto.

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Redbook Adds to Editorial Staff

Redbook editor-in-chief Jill Herzig has announced a trio of appointments to the editorial team. Leslie Robarge and Sarah Smith join the magazine as deputy editors, while Tiffany Blackstone has been promoted to deputy editor.

Robarge comes to Redbook after a stint at Bon Appetit, where as project manager she developed a line of branded small appliances, cookware, and kitchen tools exclusively sold on HSN.  Prior to that, Robarge was  freelance writer whose articles appeared in several periodicals including The New York Times Magazine, InStyle, and BusinessWeek. Earlier in her career, she was a senior editor at Glamour.

Smith most recently was editorial director of KIWI. During her tenure, the brand won two Folio Eddie awards. She was also a senior editor at Parenting and news editor at Psychology Today.

Blackstone has been a senior editor at Redbook where she edited the ASME-nominated Would You Get a Mommy Tuck? Prior to joining Redbook, Blackstone was a freelance writer for Glamour, Self, and Essence.

Pen Smart Features for Psychology Today

You don’t need a Ph.D. to write for Psychology Today (and you don’t necessarily have to quote one either). The magazine, which once was the pub of the American Psychological Association, went from dry, clinical research to fresh, accessible writing thanks to the efforts of EIC Kaja Perina. So, don’t worry if you’re not an authority in the world of psychology. As long as your ideas and writing are fresh, you could land a byline.

The magazine publishes bimonthly, so it isn’t dependent on breaking news. “We can’t be fast, so we try to be smart. We always want to look at what’s causing a particular trend,” said Perina.  You can also break into the pub by pitching the mag’s blogs. “We’re interested in everything that touches on human behavior, on how we relate to the world,” she said.

Read more in How To Pitch: Psychology Today. [subscription required]

Pen Smart Features for Psychology Today

You don’t need a Ph.D. to write for Psychology Today (and you don’t necessarily have to quote one either). The magazine, which once was the pub of the American Psychological Association, went from dry, clinical research to fresh, accessible writing thanks to the efforts of EIC Kaja Perina. So, don’t worry if you’re not an authority in the world of psychology. As long as your ideas and writing are fresh, you could land a byline.

The magazine publishes bimonthly, so it isn’t dependent on breaking news. “We can’t be fast, so we try to be smart. We always want to look at what’s causing a particular trend,” said Perina.  You can also break into the pub by pitching the mag’s blogs. “We’re interested in everything that touches on human behavior, on how we relate to the world,” she said.

Read more in How To Pitch: Psychology Today. [subscription required]

Psychology Today Pulls Offensive Article on Black Women from Website

Every now and then comes along an article so shockingly appalling that the only explanation is that all the editors at the publication have been taken hostage. This one might be the best example yet: on May 15th, Psychology Today posted an article by evolutionary psychologist Satoshi Kanazawa called “Why Are Black Women Less Physically Attractive Than Other Women?”

Yes, you read that right. The article goes on to make some deeply offensive and weakly supported claims such as “It is very interesting to note that, even though black women are objectively less physically attractive than other women, black women (and men) subjectively consider themselves to be far more physically attractive than others… Nor can the race difference in intelligence [...] account for the race difference in physical attractiveness among women.”

Kanazawa attempts to make it seem as though his theories have arisen from “objective data,” but actually the opposite seems to be true: he is providing a shallow interpretation of data to support his offensive theories.

The article is no longer available on Psychology Today‘s website, though you can read it here (via). At first, we learn from Adweek, the magazine tried to soften the piece by tacking on this headline instead: “Why Are African-American Women Rated Less Attractive Than Other Women, but Black Men Are Rated Better Looking Than Other Men?” But it didn’t do the trick, and the article was widely lambasted not only by feminist blogs, but by academics, before being pulled altogether. We will update if the editors are finally released from captivity and issue an apology.