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Posts Tagged ‘Randall Lane’

Michael Solomon Named Editor of ForbesLife

Michael Solomon has been named editor of ForbesLife, the luxury lifestyle magazine from Forbes. Solomon most recently worked as executive editor of Byliner, the digital publisher. Previously he was features director at The Daily Beast and from 1989 through 1997, served as features editor for Esquire.

“ForbesLife is a unique product in the luxury space, with unmatched access into the lives and passions of the most successful people in the world,” said Forbes’ editor Randall Lane, in a statement. “Michael brings with him not only extensive editorial experience in the lifestyle arena, but also a mastery of both magazines and digital.”

Solomon starts immediately and reports to Lane.

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Travel Writing

Travel WritingStarting September 23, learn how to turn your travel stories into published essays and articles! Taught by a former Vanity Fair staff writer, James Sturz will teach you how to report, interview, and find sources, discover story ideas and pitch them successfully, and understand what travel editors look for in a story. Register now! 

Tom Brokaw, Vernon Jordan and the Shy Divorcee

1003_mockup.gifIt was SRO at Michael’s today. The dining room was so jam packed every sqaure inch was occupied by a mogul (Mel Karmazin!), media heavyweight (Tom Brokaw, Jon Meacham, Jeff Zucker), or social swan (divorcee of the moment, Mercedes Bass who moved to the Garden Room with pal Lynn Nesbitt when the decibel level and fabulousness of it all got to be too much).  Just a thought: if you’re looking for a quiet, out of the way lunch spot, you might want to consider going somewhere else on Wednesday.

I was joined today by Forbes‘ new editor, Randall Lane. In his new position, Randall is presiding over familiar territory to him: the lives of the ridiculously rich and ambitious. In a previous life, he was the editor of Trader Monthly which chronicled the age of excess of the Wall Streeter of days gone by.  That experience later provided plenty of fodder for his book, The Zeroes: My Misadventures in the Decade When Wall Street Went Insane. In the interim, he’s been an editor at large for Newsweek and written for The Daily Beast. Having worked with him years ago when he was the editor in chief on the startup Justice, which covered the hot trials and legal issues of the day, I was thrilled when I heard he’d gotten the top job at Forbes back in September.

Randall first worked at Forbes fresh out of college in the nineties and spent six years “chasing rich people” and working on the franchise’s venerated power lists which required (and still do) hundreds of hours of research and manpower. “In some ways, it feels like I never left,” he tells me.

Diane Clehane and Randall Lane
Randall Lane and yours truly

Since taking the helm, Randall has been on a mission to make the book more visually exciting with interesting photography (the arresting cover image of Bill Gates in the “World’s 70 Most Powerful People” issue is a winner), fresh design elements courtesy of the Brooklyn-based shop Athletics, a livelier front of book section and more in-depth profiles on people the Forbes reader wants to know about.  Exhibit A: The cover story in the November 7 issue on Dropbox’s Drew Houston, the 28 year-old mogul who turned down Steve Jobs and is now worth $600 million which drew one million hits on Forbes.com.

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Doubledown Media Shuts Down Operations

Trader_monthly_COVER2.jpgFolio is reporting that Doubledown Media, the publisher of magazines aimed at the “working, wealthy men” of Wall St. including Trader Monthly, Dealmaker, Private Air, and Corporate Leader, has shut down. According to the memo sent out by Randall Lane to staffers,

I cannot begin to convey how heartbroken we are. These are unprecedented times: the combination of the media depression, the Wall Street implosion and the credit slowdown were collectively too much for our company — probably any company in our shoes — to overcome.

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