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Posts Tagged ‘Rebecca Blumenstein’

Dow Jones Makes Several Leadership Changes, Names Almar Latour Exec Editor

Dow Jones has made three changes to its editorial leadership. According to a memo from Gerard Baker, editor-in-chief of Dow Jones and managing editor of The Wall Street JournalAlmar Latour has been promoted to executive editor, and Rebecca Blumenstein and Matt Murray have been promoted to deputy editors-in-chief.

Per the memo, Blumenstein will be overseeing news content and Murray will be overseeing output. In his new role, Latour will “assume responsibility for our editorial strategy around the world,” explained Baker.

Baker also writes that a new Page One editor for the Journal will be named in the next few days.

All appointments take effect January 1, 2013. Baker’s full note can be seen below.

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The Wall Street Journal Names New Page One Editor

Rebecca Blumenstein is The Wall Street Journal’s new Page One Editor. She will keep the title of Deputy Managing Editor as well. Robert Thomson said the following about the move:

She will bring her verve, energy, creativity and logistical acumen to the important task of enterprising journalism, both in landmark projects and in driving the news agenda (not being driven by it). Ambitious journalism is a vital part of our future. Rebecca’s global and digital background will ensure that our stories have maximum impact, here and abroad, and across languages and platforms. She will be traveling and talking far and wide to generate original ideas and pursue angles beyond the means or wit of our competitors.

Matt Murray will take over Blumenstein’s position as International Editor, and Alex Martin is now Deputy Managing Editor and National Editor, Murray’s former position.

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: The Year’s Biggest Moves In Media

door.jpgThis year — full of flux and uncertainty about where the media is heading — has resulted in a vast number of job changes and departures across all matter of media companies and publications. In almost every field of journalism, big names have either been fired, promoted, retired, or simply moved on to more lucrative positions. Here, we take a look back at the biggest industry shakeups of 2009.

The Biggest Move in Magazines: Stephen Adler leaving BusinessWeek.
When editor Stephen Adler announced his departure from BusinessWeek this October following the magazine’s sale to Bloomberg LP, he wasn’t just making a statement, he was starting a trend. Soon he was followed by some of his former colleagues, like John Byrne and BusinessWeek‘s president Keith Fox, who decided to stay with magazine’s original parent, McGraw-Hill. (Not to mention all of those who involuntarily left the pub not long after.) It takes a lot of chutzpah to up and quit your editor gig in the middle of this turbulent media landscape, it takes even more to get your coworkers to come with you. Fortunately for Adler, he’s already landed another gig at Thomson Reuters.

Runners Up: Time.com managing editor Josh Tyrangiel comes on board as editor at Businessweek; Marie Claire‘s publisher Susan Plagemann joins Vogue; Nancy Berger Cardone of shuttered Gourmet takes Plagemann’s spot at Marie Claire; Janice Min leaves Us Weekly; Mariette DiChristina becomes Scientific American‘s first female editor-in-chief.

More after the jump

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Keller’s Letter To Award Committee Comes To Light, Journal Responds

nytwsj.jpgEarlier this week, New York Times‘ media columnist David Carr wrote a piece summarizing the last two years at The Wall Street Journal since it was sold by the Bancroft family to Rupert Murdoch‘s News Corp.

The article boiled down to the fact that the publication has become, in Carr’s opinion, much more right-wing and conservative, especially in its D.C. bureau, following the takeover. Immediately after the piece was published, we received a comment from Robert Thompson, managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, who accused Carr of bringing up old rivalries between the two publications. Although it has to be mentioned that in his statement it was Thompson who rehashed old fights, by mentioning how last year Times‘ executive editor Bill Keller wrote a memo to “a prize committee” urging them to look closer at some of the Journal‘s stories before handing out awards for excellence in journalism.

And in case you thought that would be the end of it, you were wrong: now that the two print titans have each other in the crosshairs, neither is backing down. Oooh, fight!

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WSJ.com Gets New Digital Czar

journal logo 2.pngYesterday, we reported that Rebecca Blumenstein, the managing editor of WSJ.com, had been promoted to international editor of the paper. So, it follows that someone would have to be named to replace her.

Last night, Wall Street Journal managing editor Robert Thomson sent a memo to staffers announcing the promotion of WSJ.com’s deputy managing editor Kevin Delaney to the Web site’s top spot.

Delaney started his career at the Journal as an intern in college in 1992. He went on to work in the paper’s Paris and San Francisco bureaus before joining the WSJ.com staff. He was named deputy managing editor of the site in July 2008.

Thomson’s full memo, after the jump

Previously: WSJ.com Managing Editor Blumenstein Named Journal Deputy Editor

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WSJ.com Managing Editor Blumenstein Named Journal Deputy Editor

journal logo 2.pngWall Street Journal managing editor Robert Thomson sent a memo to the paper’s staff yesterday announcing the appointment of Rebecca Blumenstein as international editor and deputy managing editor of the paper. Blumenstein, who was just appointed managing editor of WSJ.com in June, is replacing Nik Deogun, who is leaving print journalism altogether — he’s joining CNBC as the network’s managing editor.

Before joining WSJ.com earlier this year, Blumenstein served as international news editor and China editor at the paper, making her the perfect candidate to oversee the Journal‘s international coverage, Thomson pointed out. “[S]he is well aware of the challenges of life as a correspondent and acutely conscious of our digital potential, which she will continue to realize with her customary vigor and creativity,” he said in his memo.

Thomson’s full memo after the jump. Bonus points to anyone who can explain what the “troika” is at WSJ. (Update: We’ve learned that Thomson coined the term, which refers to the three deputy managing editors who coordinate the news teams and coverage for the Journal, in a memo last year. The troika is now made up of national editor Matt Murray, Page One editor Mike Williams and Blumenstein.)

Related: Rebecca Blumenstein Named WSJ.com Managing Editor –WebNewser

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