TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Rebecca Traister’

Aron Pilhofer Joins The Guardian; Elle and Mashable Add Editors

A few more moves today, involving The Guardian, Elle and Mashable. Details are below.

  • Aron Pilhofer is leaving The New York Times for The Guardian. Pilhofer had been with the Times since 2005, most recently serving as associate managing editor for digital strategy. At The Guardian, Pilhofer will serve as executive editor of digital, a new role at the company.
  • Elle has added Rebecca Traister and Amanda Fortini as contributing editors. Traister will continue as a senior editor at The New Republic. Fortini’s work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Rolling Stone, New York and more.
  • Louise Roug has been named Mashable’s first global news editor. Roug was formerly the foreign editor for Newsweek and The Daily Beast, from 2010 to 2013.
Mediabistro Course

Overcoming Writer's Block

Overcoming Writer's BlockUse proven tools and exercises to get back to writing! Starting July 15, learn a process that will help you pinpoint your optimal writing conditions, structure your time and build a framework to increase your productivity. Register now! 

The New Republic Adds Jason Zengerle, Names Two Senior Editors

The New Republic has named three new senior editors this week. Details are below.

    • Jason Zengerle is returning to TNR, where he once worked for 12 years. He will serve as a senior editor. Zengerle most recently served as a senior staff writer at Politico. Prior to that, Zengerle served as contributing editor for GQ and New York.
    • Rebecca Traister joins TNR from Salon, where she had been since 2003. Previously, she was a writer for The New York Observer. Traister is the author of Big Girls Don’t Cry: The Election That Changed Everything For American Women, a 2010 New York Times Notable Book and winner of the Ernesta Drinker Ballard Book Prize.
    • Evgeny Morozov moves up from contributing editor of TNR to senior editor. His work has appeared in The New York TimesThe Wall Street JournalThe Washington Post, Financial TimesThe Economist and more. Morozov has also written two books.

The 2012 Mirror Awards Winners

The 2012 Mirror Awards winners were announced today at an event hosted by Anderson Cooper. Here is a look back at the various finalists.

Congrats to those nominated (again) and those who won. Below are the winners.

Best Commentary, Digital Media

Rebecca Traister (Salon.com, NYTimes.com)

Best Profile, Digital Media

Joe Pompeo, “The road ahead for The Huffington Post: Nine months and a merger later, ‘Capital-J Journalism’ is still a work in progress” (Capital New York)

Best Single Article, Digital Media

Rhonda Roland Shearer and Malik Ayub Sumbal, “Mrs. Bhutto’s Murder Anniversary Part 1: Troubling Double Standard, American photojournalism’s different treatment of foreign victims” (iMediaEthics)

Best Commentary, Traditional/Legacy Media

Anna Holmes (The New York TimesThe Washington Post)

Read more

2012 Mirror Awards Finalists Announced

The S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications has unveiled the 2102 Mirror Awards finalists. Winners will be announced June 13, at an event hosted by Anderson Cooper.

Below is the complete list of finalists.

Read more

Steinem’s Women’s Media Center Holds First Annual Media Awards

wmc1.jpgLast night marked the first annual Women’s Media Center Media Awards at the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation in midtown. Catered and cozy, the event took place in a small, packed room brimming with well-established female media types and bright-eyed J-school students, with a mic stand in the corner for awardees like Salon.com‘s Rebecca Traister, as well as hosts Gloria Steinem and WMC President Carol Jenkins. 



The evening was divided into two parts: the first honored six women in the media industry who have done outstanding work in bringing women’s issues to the forefront of media coverage; the second part cued a wag of the finger at organizations and events that shed a particularly negative light upon women in the past year. “It’s very important that we criticize when [women's coverage] is incomplete, but praise when it’s complete,” Steinem said, explaining the reason for organizing the awards this way.

In her opening remarks, Steinem also associated the media with a modern-day campfire, a place where people gather to tell stories and express themselves. “It is crucial that everyone’s stories be told…the media is our campfire,” she said. “And if we cannot tell our stories or have people listen to our stories, we feel alone.”

Read more

Is Coverage of the Online Glass Ceiling Just Reinforcing It?

02_24_47_Orr_Judith_Through the glass ceiling.jpgLots of talk today about women and blogging, much of it kicked off by the NYT‘s coverage of the annual BlogHer conference in San Francisco last week-end. The article was widely criticized by women in the blogosphere and many questioned whether the NYT was merely reinforcing the glass ceiling that BlogHer was set up to combat by running the piece in the Style section and by focusing on particularly feminine things like the bathroom setup, the lactation room, child care. Meanwhile, the Netroots gathering in Austin, which took place on the same week-end, received far more extensive coverage, and not just because Al Gore and Nancy Pelosi made appearances. Notes Jezebel’s Megan Carpentier: “A cursory search of the Times’ archives shows no less than 10 stories filed with the paper or its blogs during Netroots Nation…This weekend’s story on BlogHer was the first the Times had filed about the event.” Says Salon‘s Rebecca Traister,

The problem is not simply with the placement of one story, but with a newspaper that does not take “women’s stories” — in this case one that could have also been about business, technology, politics or gender as a social, economic or professional impediment to success — seriously enough to give them other, more newsy space in its pages.

Another publisher who apparently isn’t taking their online women’s stories very seriously is Conde Nast. The Observer is reporting that the publisher has a series of online “‘girl’-illa blogs” that it does not seem terribly interested in promoting. And why would they when print is so profitable these days! In the meantime, and until everyone else catches up, there’s always Jezebel.

Elle’s Women in Hollywood Roundtable

Elle.jpg

Salon’s Rebecca Traister sits in on Elle’s Women in Hollywood round table discussion on the state of show biz, why there aren’t more women directors, and so on. The group wonders why women don’t go to opening weekends, forgetting that people watch movies lots of other ways than at the multiplex, not than any of them ever see films with the public. While distinguished and credible, the ten are sort of randomly chosen. At the table are:

Moderator/producer Lynda Obst (called one of Tinseltown’s great brains, which is a frightening thought)
Claims Kate Hudson has same power as Julia Roberts and Reese Witherspoon in getting girly movies green-lit. Because the audience is clamoring for more.

Writer/director Nora Ephron
Thinks Transformers had a great emotional theme, sucks up to Spielberg. Claims to meet only timid girls at film schools. Ever wonder if she still takes calls from Meg Ryan?

Writer/producer Laura Ziskin
Discussing the lack of female directors, drops a bomb,

Our children watched their mothers and said, “Oh, no thank you. I don’t want my life to be like that.”

Writer/director Callie Khouri
Claims she wanted to make a NASCAR movie. So she directed Ya-Ya Sisterhood instead? Just made indie movie with Diane Keaton, Queen Latifah and Katie Holmes and wonders why no studio wanted it. Then complains about the lack of wish fulfillment in Judd Apatow movies.

Writer/director Patty Jenkins
Liked Spiderman. Admits to concentrating on personal life after making Monster.

Producer Cathy Konrad
Has small child, married to business partner Jim Mangold, admits to scaling back work for family.

Writer/director/producer Kimberly Piece
Loves blowing things up, just made second film.

Writer/producer Andrea Berloff
Has little kid, wonders why more women aren’t in film biz. But she’s fairly new to the business, as World Trade Center was her first produced script.

Writer/producer Margaret Nagle
Breaks away from approved party line by believing babe/nerd hookup in Knocked Up.

Universal president of production Donna Langley (called “that rarest of Hollywood breeds, a female studio head”, as Amy Pascal, wasn’t in the room.)
Points out that despite Jodie Foster’s tiny cameo, lots of women went to see Inside Man starring Denzel Washington. See Queen Latifah, wish fulfillment above.

The discussion was held in August, so Jeff Robinov’s foot hadn’t entered his mouth yet.

These women don’t pay attention to the few women working as TV directors and that reality TV could be a training ground for women (who are usually credited as field producers). Michael Apted started in documentary, after all.

But there’s a big snob factor in features, and never underestimate the insularity of Hollywood. Directors who came from TV, like Dennie Gordon, Betty Thomas, and Mimi Leder, and those who go back and forth, like Nicole Holofcener tend to not get called for big tentpole pictures.

Nikki Finke picks out some high points, but think how lively the discussion could have been, had she sat at the table.

Elle hosts the 14th annual Women in Hollywood Tribute at the Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills on Oct. 15, when it will honor actresses Lauren Bacall, Scarlett Johansson, Diane Lane, Kate Bosworth, Jennifer Connelly, Amy Adams and director Julie Taymor.