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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Burton’

In Praise of Philip Seymour Hoffman

PhilipSeymourHoffmanAMostWantedManReaction to John le Carré‘s essay in this Sunday’s New York Times is cascading forth on Twitter.

From San Francisco, Nelle Engeron opines that the piece is “the brilliant and heartbreaking obituary he [Philip Seymour Hoffman] deserves.” In Madison, Wisconsin, Dave Martin dubs le Carré’s “Staring at the Flame” the “best read of the week.” And from London, singer David Albury calls the article: “Touching and honest. And sad.” They’re all correct.

From le Carré’s essay:

No actor had ever made quite the impact on me that Philip did at that first encounter: not Richard Burton, not Burt Lancaster or even Alec Guinness. Philip greeted me as if he’d been waiting to meet me all his life, which I suspect was how he greeted everyone. But I’d been waiting to meet Philip for a long time.

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AP Reporter Recalls His Busboy Days with Elizabeth Taylor

In the wake of Elizabeth Taylor‘s death, reporters who crossed paths with her away from the movie set have been sharing their experiences. Hollywood Reporter film critic Todd McCarthy once bumped into the actress in the foyer of Chasen’s, for example.

But the best such recollection so far comes from Southern California AP reporter Jeff Wilson (pictured). When he was a teenager, he worked as a busboy at the now razed Mexican restaurant the El Chiquito Inn, which was right across the street from Warner Bros. in Burbank. During the filming of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, he served Taylor and husband, co-star Richard Burton many times:

I was awestruck. Those violet eyes took my breath away. And that cleavage, well, it (they?) meant a lot to a 16-year-old high school kid… She was a jaw-dropping beauty like no one else.

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The Film Elizabeth Taylor Wants To Be Remembered For

Barbara Walters, who was in contact with Elizabeth Taylor right up to the death of the beloved 79-year-old icon in Los Angeles early this morning, told Good Morning America that the actress wanted to be remembered above all for her work in the 1966 film Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

That’s no surprise. Of the nearly dozen film collaborations Taylor made with the love of her life, Richard Burton, this searing adaptation of the Edward Albee play stands as the pair’s best. It won Taylor one of her two Best Actress Oscars and presented the UK born stunner in a far different light, partly because she was willing to gain 30 pounds to play middle-aged Martha. (Haskell Wexler, who took home the Oscar for Best Cinematography that year, was brought on as a last minute replacement to help “beautify” the actress, but that idea thankfully quickly went out the window.)

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