TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Richard Prince’

March Issue of Essence Faces Criticism

Richard Prince, writing for the Maynard Institute of Journalism Education, has some harsh words for the March issue of Essence. He says that the majority of the women in the magazine are wearing wigs or weaves – and the deeper message behind that, that black women aren’t beautiful unless they have artificial hair – is upsetting.

He writes that Essence must have been only thinking about one thing when doing this: the bottom line.

“The images seem guaranteed to bolster the $247.7 million American market for ethnic personal care products — which comprise the majority of the Essence advertisers.”

Essence Spokesperson Dana Baxter replied to Prince’s claim, and said generalizations are never wise. “Making such a broad generalization based on just one issue of the magazine obscures the brand and its inclusiveness over the past 40 years,” she explained.

Danielle Belton, the author behind the popular blog Black Snob, told Prince Baxter’s response missed the point:

Read more

Huffington Post Launches New African-American Section with BET‘s Sheila Johnson

The Huffington Post is partnering with BET co-founder Sheila Johnson to launch a new African-American section called “HuffPost GlobalBlack”–”a new online platform offering news, politics, culture, opinion, and video through the lens of the black experience,” according to the press release. HuffPo has been under fire as of late from the likes of the Maynard Institute‘s Richard Prince among others, for the lack of diversity among its paid staff. Nice to see the site making inroads into a more all-inclusive world-view.

“HuffPost GlobalBlack” is scheduled to make its debut in March, and will be followed by a Latino section later this year.

Previously on Fishbowl LA: The Huffington Post Is Awfully Pale–But Don’t Ask Them About It

Press release after the jump:

Read more

The Huffington Post Is Awfully Pale–But Don’t Ask Them About It

Over at Poynter, Richard Prince has a column noting that new media companies are incredibly resistant to answering questions about the diversity of their staff–especially the Huffington Post.

For at least the last two years, Arianna Huffington’s pioneering, buzz-creating website has posted photos of its staff holiday party, and a casual glance shows few people of color.

That might explain the skepticism that greets declarations of commitments to diversity from HuffPost and others that won’t say exactly how diverse they are. They don’t seem to believe that the old Ronald Reagan line — “Trust but verify” — applies to them.

Asked to name the one or two staffers in last month’s photo who appeared to be African American, Mario Ruiz, spokesman for the operation, replied by e-mail, “sorry, cant identify folks for you.”

The photo Prince is referring to, shown top left of this post, is from a recent HuffPo holiday party. Awfully pale indeed.

Read more

Associated Press to Drop Its 26-Year-Old Internship Program

Despite the pleas of UNITY: Journalists of Color, the Asian American Journalists Association, the Native American Journalists Association and the Society of Professional Journalists, the Associated Press has decided not to bring back its 26-year old internship program. AP chief executive officer Tom Curley confirmed to UNITY president Barbara Ciara that the program was as good as dead as of the end of 2010.

On his Journal-isms blog, Richard Prince notes that the program began primarily as a way to increase the pool of minority journalists. The loss of the internship program is a huge loss for diversity in the newsroom.

Tony Winton, president of the News Media Guild, told Prince that the program costs between $600,000 to $800,000 a year–not an outrageous sum–and that the interns are paid union scale. The program has paid dividends for the company, as many former interns now hold high ranking positions within the news organization. Former intern Anthony Marquez runs the AP’s LA bureau.

A tough blow for young journalists looking to break into an already shrinking biz.

A New Award On The Block

sidney.pngAdvertising Age‘s Simon Dumenco expressed his distaste for the Mirror Awards and Arianna Huffington earlier this week, but we think he would have a hard time finding fault in this new journalism award.

Starting in July, the Sidney Hillman Foundation will present “The Sidney,” an award honoring socially-conscious journalism, every month. The winner, which can be a magazine, newspaper, Web site, photo essay or any broadcast outlet, will win $500 and “a bottle of union-made wine,” the foundation said. Nominations can be submitted through the foundation’s Web site.

Meanwhile, the debate about Huffington’s legitimacy as the recipient of this year’s Fred Dressler Lifetime Achievement Award at the Mirror Awards luncheon next week continues. Yesterday, Richard Prince interviewed Lorraine Branham, dean of the Syracuse University’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, which presents the Mirror Awards, who stood by the school’s decision to honor Huffington.

“I spent 25 years in the newspaper business and I certainly believe journalists should be paid for their work,” Branham said, according to Prince’s online column Journal-isms. “But I am also a realist who can plainly see what is happening to the profession I know and love. It has changed and will continue to do so, and at a frightening pace…The old revenue model is in shambles and I don’t think we can lay the blame for this at the doorstep of the Huffington Post.”

Frey Goes Arty: ‘The Idea Was To Do A Cool Book That Would Piss People Off’

Richardson&Frey.jpg
James Frey (right) and Terry Richardson grin at the prospect of ticking folks off at their book talk.

Controversy-friendly author James Frey and photographer Terry Richardson don’t much believe in rules, so the two intentional outsiders teaming up on a book/photo project makes a sort of sense. For those who don’t know that Frey is co-partner of Half Gallery with Andy Spade and Bill Powers, the move may surprise, but for the writer himself, it was just a matter of time.

“I’m much more part of the art world than I am the literary world,” Frey said before the duo’s Thursday night talk at Manhattan’s Strand Bookstore. “I wanted to make a cool, sort of radical, fun art book. I have no interest in being called a memoirist. I’m a writer.”

Read more

Chicago Tribune Editor Resigns

lipinski2.jpg
Richard Prince is reporting (fourth item down) that Ann Marie Lipinski has resigned from her post as editor of the Chicago Tribune, where she has worked since she was a summer intern in 1978.

Lipinski doesn’t name Sam Zell as the reason for her departure — in fact, she’s careful not to poison the well at all. In one of the classiest resignation letters we’ve ever seen, she tells the staff only “professionally, this position is not the fit it once was.”

More:

Read more

We Media 2007: What’s a Journalist, Again?

WeMedia_trees.jpg

Lunchtime at We Media 2007

We’ve gone down to the We Media conference in Florida — not for the weather, but to see a bunch of New Yorkers we haven’t seen in New York recently. The AP’s Jim Kennedy stood up from the auditorium audience and asked folks talking on and with the first panel — about community, about how Big Media don’t get it, about who’s a journalist, anyway, what’s “citizen journalism” — and get on with deciding what we can actually DO about it all. “It’s late in the day,” he told us later. Amen.

One who does seem to be doing something is Lisa Stone, who proudly talked of how her BlogHer women’s network brings together women who are now not just media consumers, but also participants. And about a previous project she did in which lawyers blogged their cases, adding real knowledge to the world because journalists covering the stuff weren’t lawyers and don’t understand it as well.

We also ran into designer Roger Black, Reuters exec Chris Ahearn, New York-based vlogger “Happy Slip,” Lauren Cornell of NY arts org Rhizome, Jan Schafer of DC’s J-lab, Gloria Pan who’s still helping out the We Media folks (even though they’re no longer American Press Institute), Jody Brannon of MSN, Richard Prince of the WashPo and his own “Journal-isms” site on diversity, NPR’s Farai Chideya and a bunch of others.

[FULL DISCLOSURE: mediabistro.com is a media sponsor of the conference.]

More photos:

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGE