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Posts Tagged ‘Richard Turley’

Walter Isaacson, Harvey Weinstein and Johnny Weir I Linda Fairstein Emcees Authors In Kind

LunchAtMichaelsHallelujah! What better way to celebrate the first day when it actually felt like springtime in the city than to dine and dish at two jammed packed Manhattan power lunches. This being Wednesday, we of course made our weekly pilgrimage to Michael’s to observe the famous and fabulous in their natural habitat and then hot-footed it over to The Metropolitan Club for the Annual Authors in Kind Literary Luncheon, benefiting God’s Love We Deliver. At 55th and Fifth, the joint was jumping with plenty of media mavens (David Zaslav, Henry Schleiff), talking heads (Joe Kernen, Jim Murphy and Star Jones), serious scribes (Walter Isaacson) and the random celebrity of the week — none other than Johnny Weir. I wished I’d gotten to talk to Johnny about his oh-so-messy divorce. Heaven knows what he would have said. Oh well, next time.

Johnny Weir, Bonnie FullerUptown at the Metropolitan Club, I joined Michael’s regular Mickey Ateyeh (“Oh my God! I didn’t realize this was on a Wednesday!”) for the Authors In Kind Luncheon, which was emceed by another Michael’s pal Linda Fairstein (we’ll be dishing for this column about her next book, Terminal City, in June). Having never been to this event before, it was truly a memorable afternoon. Before lunch, the authors slated to speak at the luncheon — Barbara Ehrenreich, Michael Anthony and Robin Cook — signed books they generously donated to the attendees. Spotted in the crowd:  60 Minutes’ Lesley Stahl and Grand Central Publishing’s Deb Futter. Before everyone sat down to eat, I chatted with Assael’s Lawrence Lewis and Mickey. Angela Cummings for Assael, was one of the event’s sponsors along with CH Carolina Herrera, so it was quite the elegant affair. But behind the glitz and glamour that went along with the swanky surroundings, the inspiring and uplifting tone to the event, which was set beautifully by God’s Love We Deliver president & CEO Karen Pearl, carried the day. Karen shared the stories of several clients whose battles with life-altering illnesses were made more bearable to them and their families because of the organization’s nutrious meals and personalized care. She thanked the volunteers who prepare and deliver them (I was seated next to one such “angel,” Douglas Elliman’s Peter J. Forsman, who was delightful company) and introduced a video that highlighted their work. “Food is medicine,” explained Karen. “And love is the special ingredient.”

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Businessweek Wins Cover of The Year Poll

bw-twitter-cover

Congratulations are in order for the staffers at Bloomberg Businessweek. The magazine’s Henry Luce/Twitter bird cover has won FishbowlNY’s 2013 Cover of The Year poll. Businessweek won fairly easily, receiving 43 percent of the votes. Boston magazine’s impressive dedication to the Boson Marathon bombing victims was the runner-up, with 23 percent. The Atlantic — last year’s winner — finished third.

It’s not much of a surprise that Businessweek won. The magazine’s creative team, led by Richard Turley, continually cranks out remarkable work. The winning cover, illustrated by David Parkins, is truly worth honoring.

Thanks to everyone who voted and once again, congrats to Businessweek. Your prize is in the mail. Maybe.

Businessweek Does it Again

If we worked at Twitter, we’d have the latest Bloomberg Businessweek framed. How amazing is this? It’s one of the best Businessweek covers we’ve ever seen, and certainly in the running for FishbowlNY’s Cover of The Year.

Thanks to everyone at Businessweek, but especially Richard Turley, Businessweek’s creative director, and David Parkins, who created the illustration. This cover is why we’ll never quit magazines.

Latest Businessweek Cover is Worth a Peek

Bloomberg Bonerweek has done it again. Well done, Richard Turley and crew.

Businessweek Debuts ‘Cover Trails’

We’re big fans of Bloomberg Businessweek’s covers, so we’re excited about the new “Cover Trails” feature that has been added to the front of the book.

Cover Trails are the mini-story behind how each week’s cover was made. It features thoughts from Businessweek’s editor-in-chief Josh Tyrangiel and creative director Richard Turley, ideas that were canned, and much more.

You can see them each week in print, but here’s a Cover Trail that is online now.

Businessweek Nails ‘Selling Obama’ Cover

Yet another classic from Richard Turley and the Businessweek design gang. On his Tumblr, Turley said the inspiration came from an issue of The Stranger, published in 1966. Here is the cover article, by Joshua Green.

While you soak in the greatness above, we’re going shopping for some Obama tube socks.

Businessweek’s ‘How To’ Issue Features Over 60 Contributors

Bloomberg Businessweek’s first “How To” issue was great, and the second installment only improves upon last year’s. This edition is jam-packed with articles from over 60 different contributors and it spans 44 pages.

The “How To’s” cover all sorts of topics. There is “How to Take a Punch,” by boxing’s best trainer, Freddie Roach, “How to Dress for Work,” by Michael Kors, “How to Motivate People,” by Rahm Emanuel and there’s even “How to Do a To Do,” by Martha Stewart.

The latest issue — available April 13 — is also the 100th since Josh Tyrangiel and Richard Turley took over and revamped the entire magazine. So far so good, we’d say.

Josh Tyrangiel on Businessweek: ‘The Target Audience is Me’

You have to hand it to Josh Tyrangiel, the Editor-in-Chief of Bloomberg Businessweek, the guy knows what he’s doing. His magazine is all the rage right now because he consistently gives readers high quality content presented in an interesting way. He’s talked about how this process happens before, and last Thursday he expanded on it during a talk with Columbia students.

WWD reports that Tyrangiel (Creative Director Richard Turley also spoke) explained to the audience that the he maintains a magazine that people want to read because he makes sure that it’s one that he would want to flip through first:

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Words are ‘Page Clutter to Be Eliminated’ and Other Tips from ‘Magazine Designer’s Guide to Magazines’

We know that infographics are so 2010, but this one, tweeted by Businessweek’s Richard Turley, is too hilarious to pass up. Maybe this is old? We’re not sure, but the “Magazine Designer’s Guide to Magazines” includes guidelines that seem to be spot on: Editors are “A person you ignore except when they are praising you,” the best way to solve a design problem in men’s mags is to place giant pictures of Megan Fox around a tiny bit of text, and a “how to layout” guide for several magazines, including The New York Times Magazine:

  1. Congratulate yourself and co-workers for working at The New York Times
  2. Eat entire Toblerone bar
  3. Open family sized chip packet
  4. Have lunch
  5. Agonize for five hours over bespoke caption treatment
  6. Return home to shared apartment in Brooklyn to play with pet-rescue dog

See? It’s funny! Click here for an expandable view of the infographic.

UPDATE:
Turley just confirmed that this graphic is a year old, which makes it like 573 years old in Internet Time, but we don’t care. It’s still good.

Businessweek Revamps Website

The days of Bloomberg Businessweek magazine looking a hell of a lot better than its website are officially over. Businessweek.com used to be boring and complicated to navigate — basically the exact opposite of the print counterpart — but now it’s vibrant, clean and inviting. The new look is thanks to Richard Turley, Businessweek’s Creative Director, who routinely makes the magazine a must see.

We’re happy it has changed. We would routinely stay away from its site because of the clutter, but with a revamp, Josh Tyrangiel, the magazine’s Editor-in-Chief, said things are different now. “We’ve completely realigned the culture of Businessweek so it’s a digital news organization, he told Adweek. “People have turned on the juice.”

UPDATE:
A Businessweek spokesperson wanted us to note that it wasn’t just Turley who is responsible for the new site; he worked on it along with a team of people. Now you know.

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