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Posts Tagged ‘Rob Long’

Richard Rushfield: Idol Pundit

Former LA Timer, ex-Gawker editor Richard Rushfield has turned his beat into a book: A tuned tome about a ten year old reality show. “American Idol: The Untold Story” is in stores now.

Speaking of untold stories, his book party was at a swanky undisclosed location last night. Guest included Rob Long, Clare Hoffman, Ben Goldhirsh (publisher of GOOD) and Peter Bart. From the Daily Beast, Gabe Doppelt and Kate Aurthur and novelist Andrea Seigel.

And yes, if you were wondering…he did charge his guests for copies of his book. Twenty-seven bucks each.

We won a couple of bets on that one. Now pay up.

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WGA 07 Strike Week 2: Represent!

Nina Bargiel has been mistaken for flavor-of-the-moment Diablo Cody.

What picketing is like. Writers aren’t used to this much exercise.

Rob Long explains the business model of sitcoms to Silicon Alley. Shocked merriment ensues.

Joss Whedon’s fans are researching a strike FAQ and chicken soup vendors.

Nikki Finke picks the winners of her caption contest.

Mark Deuze, a professor in Indiana, blogs about the abuse of talent in media, but needs to brush up on his show-biz lingo. Below the line isn’t just shorthand for “everyone else”.

Blogs go dark in solidarity, which is nice, but kinda dumb. “Unpaid writers stop writing to support writers who want to get paid.” Huh?

Osama bin Laden weighs in. It’s all the fault of the Jews and the gays, but really more the Jews. And especially the gay Jews.

Rob Long On Geekerati Radio

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Show biz veterano Rob Long graced Geekerati on BlogTalk radio last night. He explains the strike, in geek terms.

Rob Long: The Writers’ Strike And The Frappuccino, A Love Story.

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KCRW commentator and 17-year WGA vet Rob Long says the most important difference between any impending writers’ strike now and the one that happened in 1988 is Starbucks.

In 1988, when the last WGA strike reached a settlement — and in this context, the phrase “reached a settlement” refers to the moment that the guild membership, exhausted and broke after five months, whimpered its way to an unconditional surrender — a few days later there appeared all over town, like crocuses poking through the snow, an awful lot of spec scripts.

The town was flooded with buddy comedies, cop dramas, blended-family sitcoms, erotic thrillers and cop-partnered-with-orangutan projects. So many, in fact, that it was clear that a lot of striking guild members, when not picketing on Lankershim or brooding about their ill-treatment, had been doing a good deal more than noodling around an idea.

Although they publicly claimed to have spent the five-month strike merely thinking about writing — and the three days after it up in Big Sur, you know, just plowing through it, totally focused — it was hard to deny that some guild members took the strike as an opportunity to hit reset on their careers. So among the foreclosures and the cancellations and the force majeur’ed contracts, there was, apparently, a bright side. Something to look forward to, I guess.

But that was back in 1988, before Starbucks and iPods and Wi-Fi. Back then, most writers wrote at home, so it was easy to sit in the backyard, away from prying eyes, and work on your serial killer spec in between strike meetings. Things are different now. These days, writers sit in public places all over town, earbuds in, laptops out. The strike is going to change all of that.

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