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Posts Tagged ‘Rodale’

Hearst Taps Former Rodale Exec for New Position

Hearst Magazines has named David Kang to be its Creative Director, Content Extensions, a new position at the company. Kang, who was most recently Senior Vice President, General Manager at Rodale, will oversee a group who is responsible for expanding Hearst’s print and digital brands.

David Carey said of Kang:

We’re increasingly focused on new ways to build out revenue streams for Hearst’s brands by leveraging our rich content and editorial franchises onto multiple platforms. David has extensive experience in brand strategy and content creation and is the right person to lead our efforts in the next phase of expansion at Hearst.

Jacqueline Deval, Vice President and Publisher of Hearst Books, will also be working in Kang’s group.

Meredith Corporation Looks To Gain More Titles

In an interview with CNBC.com, Steve Lacy, the company’s Chief Executive Officer, said that within a year he expects to add several magazines, and specifically named Rodale’s Men’s Health and Women’s Health as titles Meredith was interested in acquiring. Lacy says that consolidating publications is vital, because the bigger the magazine the larger the advertisers will be.

Obviously the executives at Rodale know what Lacy knows, so we don’t see them giving up two of their most popular publications without a fight. We here at FishbowlNY see it going down much like the process of reading a Men’s Health or Women’s Health.

First there’s the bold proclamation of improving yourself (we’re going to take those from Rodale!), followed by the intense studying of a workout regimen (these numbers say we should get more magazines!), then a few tentative steps to show everyone you meant what you said (we’ve inquired about those titles, just in case), followed lastly by the decision to abandon the whole plan because sitting on your couch and eating Snickers is more fun than exercising (uh, maybe keeping our own magazines afloat in this climate is enough work for now).

Rodale Promotes Matt Bean to Mobile & Media AVP Role

According to a company statement, Rodale has named Matt Bean AVP of mobile and social & emerging media.  The new position will connect Bean to all Rodale departments and magazines such as Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Prevention, Runner’s World, and Eat This, Not That!.  Bean will be tasked with creating ideas and products involving mobile and interactive social media that connect with Rodale’s titles.

Rodale CIO Ken Citron will oversee Bean’s work and believes he will be an asset in the emerging technologies department:

Over the last year, Matt has established himself as a leader in this space and I’m confident his talent will enhance our overall digital strategy, which is an important part of our DNA and our future.

Bean joined Rodale in 2009 as brand editor at Men’s Health and Women’s Health.  He has launched over 40 mobile apps for Rodale brands and was the point man for their iPad platform.

Food Network Magazine Brings The Heat To Hearst

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Despite the shuttering of O at Home and the company layoffs in 2008, Hearst may be one of the few publishers (along with Rodale and Meredith) that came up as a winner for 2009. And by “winner” we mean “did less terribly than everyone else.” Yesterday Keith Kelly reported that the company’s Food Network Magazine — which plans to print 10 issues this year — may be “one of the fastest starting magazines in publishing history.” That doesn’t mean the magazine hasn’t had its share of problems: there has been a constant revolving door at the title despite only having 5 issues in total, with managing editor Tara Cox (who was poached from Every Day at Rachel Ray) took the same job at Men’s Journal after test-editor Jennifer Dunn ditched out after the first trial issue in 2008.

A source quoted in the piece also admits that several mid-level editors have given notice, designer Sarah Goldschadt may be heading overseas to be replaced by Shira Gordon of Self. That’s a lot of revolving doors for a magazine whose total paid circulation in 2009 was 1,196,835 for four issues.

Read More: Food Network cooks up a hit, despite turnover – New York Post

Previously: Hearst Consolidating O at Home Into O: The Oprah Magazine, Hearst the Latest to Layoff Staffers Company-Wide

The Flip Side Of Newstand Losses: Accentuate The Positive!

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Yesterday was all doom and gloom for the future of print over at The New York Times, which reported an average newsstand loss in the magazine industry of 9.1 percent and an overall circulation decline of 2.2 percent from the previous year. While we floated the idea that some of the publishers that actually showed gains (Rodale and Meredith) operated in a niche market for customers, there might be even better news over at AdAge, where Nat Ives pointed out that the individual sale losses have actually slowed down in the past year. Big sellers like Cosmopolitan and Us Weekly either slowed down their decline to the single digits, or actually improved their single-copy sales, according to the Audit Bureau of Circulations. So what’s the logic behind the market? Why did Us Weekly gain 1 percent in sales while In Touch plummeted over 10 percent? And what can cause a magazine to do fare better in subscription form than single-issue, like Woman’s Day?

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No Hope For Newsstand Sales?

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According to the Audit Bureau of Circulations, as quoted in The New York Times today, newsstand sales for magazines dropped 9.1 percent last year, with overall subscriptions 2.23 percent. Popular individual titles fell anywhere from 41 percent (W magazine) to 30 percent (Good Housekeeping).

But this isn’t all bad news: the titles that have done well in the past year, that have actually seen increases, are niche titles like Off-Road Adventures, which saw a 483 percent increase in circulation, and Rodale titles like Men’s and Women’s Health. One reason for this is that these types of print publications cater to a specific die-hard fan that may not be as willing to trade on free content.

Read More: Magazines’ Newsstand Sales Fall 9.1 Percent — New York Times

Rodale Promotes Across The Board

rodale1111.jpgBig day for Rodale, publisher of Men’s Health and Women’s Health. Allison Hobson Falkenberry, former executive director to Men’s Health has been promoted up to vice president of brand communications for all the Rodale titles, while Allison Keane will be taking the executive director position at both magazines, reporting to Falkenberry. Rodale’s Prevention magazine has also seen some upward mobility today, with Bethridge Toovell taking on the role of director of communications, and Lauren Paul has moved up to communications manager.

Full press release after the jump.

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Prevention Launches Column With The Doctors

preventionmarch.jpgRodale‘s Prevention magazine is taking its partnership with health talk show The Doctors one step further.

The magazine’s March issue, on newsstands this week, features the first installment of a monthly column featuring The Doctors‘ experts: E.R. physician Dr. Travis Stork, OB/GYN Lisa Masterson, plastic and reconstructive surgeon Dr. Drew Ordon and pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears. The column, called “Ask the Doctors,” will feature answers to real readers’ questions, as well as tips on how to “Live Like a Doc!”

Prevention and The Doctors launched a partnership in September, which included several guest appearances on the show for the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Liz Vaccariello, as well as a promotional program. Last month, the pair launched a search for one person’s inspirational story about adopting a healthier lifestyle, called America’s “Picture of Health.”

In addition to introducing this new column, Prevention‘s March issue is also a record-breaker. The issue saw advertising pages and revenue rise by 31 percent and 27 percent, respectively — making it one of the top five March issues in Prevention‘s 60-year history.

Read the full release about “Ask the Doctors” and America’s “Picture of Health” after the jump

Previously: Prevention Sees Ad Pages, Revenue Climb In March

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Slowly But Surely, Ad Pages Start to Climb For Women’s Mags

108861_whitney-houst-on-the-cover-of-instyle-january-2010.jpgFinally some good news: after two years of plummeting ad sales and scarce revenue for magazines, signs are pointing to money flowing back into print. Time Inc.one of the publishers hit hardest during the great magazine recession of the last few years — has seen its InStyle title jump 33.5 percent in ad pages for their March issue when compared to the same issue in 2009.

Meanwhile, Hearst‘s Marie Claire jumped 22.8 percent in their first quarter, and as we mentioned last week, Rodale‘s Prevention saw a 31 percent increase in ad pages for their March edition. Call it new blood — InStyle‘s recent hire of publisher Connie Anne Phillips last year, and Susan Plagemann from Marie Claire who was credited for the first quarter success (though she has now jumped to Vogue, which is also seeing ad increases) — or call it the recovery we’ve all been waiting for, but hopefully the trend of advertisers returning to magazines will continue. At least until we get this whole “selling ads on the Internet” thing figured out.

Read More: Women’s Beauty/Fashion ‘Spring Preview’: InStyle is Up Strongly –minOnline

Previously: Prevention Sees Ad Pages, Revenue Climb In March, Surveying The Damage Of Yesterday’s Time Inc. Cuts

Rolling Stone Expands Sales Team

3letter.lrg.jpgRolling Stone has had a tough couple of years: it downgraded the size of its mag, lost staffers, and hedged so long in making a viable Web presence that by the time Jann Wenner took back RollingStone.com, it was too little, too late.

But 2010 is looking up for the venerable music title, with enough cash trickling back in that Wenner could afford to hire Michael Wolfe , a veteran of GQ and Rodale‘s Best Life, as the newest associate publisher of sales.

Joining Wolfe will be Tracy Monahan, formerly of Details and Teen Vogue, as the associate publisher of marketing.

Full press release after the jump.

Read More: Rolling Stone’s Web Failure Wasn’t So Shabby, After All. But Now What? –All Things D

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