FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Roger Ebert’

National Society of Newspaper Columnists Name Finalists

Newsstand GThe National Society of Newspaper Columnists have announced its 2014 finalists. The awards celebrate those who submitted works completed during last year.

The winners will be named June 28, during a ceremony at Howard University. Below are those who made the cut.

General Interest, Over 50,000 circulation:

Humor, Over 50,000 circulation:

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

Roger Ebert Documentary Filmmaker on the Sequence He Was Happy to Let Get Away

ShutterstockRogerEbertThere was a fantastic interview over the weekend in Roger Ebert‘s paper of record, the Chicago Sun-Times, with the filmmaker getting ready to unveil at Sundance a feature documentary about the late critic.

Anyone who was a regular, early viewer of Siskel & Ebert likely recalls the pair championing Steve JamesHoop Dreams, long before there was a documentary renaissance and-or it was fashionable to hype non-fiction. As many have noted, it’s extra-special to now have James, a filmmaker who rose up alongside Ebert and his balcony-jousting partner, revisit the journalist’s life story posthumously.

At one point in the conversation with Sun-Times reporter Mike Thomas, James recalls the moments immediately following Ebert’s passing and how, although it would have made for an incredible sequence, he was glad in the end that one event turned out to be for his eyes and those of a few others, only:

“[His body] was in the chapel at the Rehab Institute. I said [to his wife Chaz], “Look, I brought the camera, but it’s sitting over there and we don’t have to film at all.” His body was lying in the chapel and there were a few close family [members] and friends and business associates, and I felt privileged to just be there among them. Everyone held hands and we all said the Lord’s Prayer, because that apparently was a prayer that Roger [liked] a lot.”

Read more

Roger Ebert Documentary Campaign Adds Very Cool T-Shirt

The Indiegogo campaign for Life Itself, a documentary about the late Roger Ebert to be directed by Steve James, is off and running. And late last night, one of the team’s members, Kat White, shared the following illustration:

RobertEbertTShirt

It’s by New York artist Justin “Squigs” Robertson, and will adorn the T-shirts and messenger bags that are given out to those contributing $40.

Read more

Who Should Ellen Dance With at Next Year’s Oscars?

There are so many show-open possibilities that come to mind for Ellen DeGeneres March 2 under the tutelage of telecast producers Neil Meron and Craig Zadan. And since Billy Crystal recently reminded just how tense the room is when the host first walks out, FishbowlNY would like to float out the following three options.

1) OPTION ONE – Dance With Everybody: Ellen could get the whole crowd into it, in the same way that Tilda Swinton did this spring at EbertFest in honor of the late Roger Ebert. Ellen dancing up and down the aisles would loosen the Dolby Theatre up, fast.

2) OPTION TWO – Dance With Jack: Nicholson would probably never go for it. But is there a more iconic audience member from the era when Academy Awards broadcasts were watchable? We don’t think so. A brief on-stage jig with the sunglassed one would get things off to a gold-standard start.

Read more

Matt Zoller Seitz Named Editor of RogerEbert.com

Matt Zoller Seitz is taking over as editor of RogerEbert.com. Seitz joined New York as its television critic in January of 2012. He will continue in that role while overseeing content, and contributing reviews, personal blogs and more to RogerEbert.com. In a post, Seitz explains his vision for the site:

This is my promise to you: as long as I’m editor of this site, not a week will pass without your reading or seeing something here that shows you movies and life from a fresh angle, and makes you want to join our conversation.

Before joining New York, Seitz was the television critic for Salon. His writing has also appeared in The New York Times, The Dallas Observer and more.

Jason Reitman Recalls His Encounters with Roger Ebert

In addition to being an immensely gifted filmmaker and inspired organizer of LACMA Live Reads, Jason Reitman is also a solid entertainment journalist. Check out the concise, clear and very compelling sentence with which he leads off his brief, touching Entertainment Weekly tribute to Roger Ebert:

I spoke with Roger Ebert perhaps a dozen times, but only heard his voice once.

Reitman’s piece, headlined “The Man Who Loved Movies,” is currently only available in the print and tablet editions of EW. It’s scheduled to go online shortly and when it does, the magazine can expect a torrent of appreciative reader comments.

Read more

The G-Rated Parenting Blog Facebook Doesn’t Want You To See*

The Tumblr blog Reasons My Son Is Crying is only 6 days old and already has an enthusiastic following. That’s because the site’s chronicle of the very specific logic behind a toddler’s meltdowns is familiar to anyone who has ever cared for young children, or even used to be one. Reasons My Son Is Crying is finding fans on Reddit and parenting blogs alike.

2013-04-08-350reasons1_1280.jpg
2013-04-08-cheesereason.jpg
Facebook, however, is not laughing. They’ve blocked the website “for being spammy or unsafe” (the blog is neither) and removed all posts that linked to it.

This isn’t the first, or even the hundredth time Facebook has blocked innocuous links and content. In 2011, Facebook briefly took down film critic Roger Ebert‘s page for “violating the terms of service” after a controversial post by the author generated complaints. Facebook soon restored Ebert’s page and said its removal had been a mistake, but declined to explain further.

Read more

Patch Editor Remembers His Close Friend, Roger Ebert

The only good thing about the death of Roger Ebert is that it has provoked an outpouring of Internet content residing far from a realm the critic never stood for: “snark.” It’s been one heartfelt, spectacular, memorable article after another, a tribute trail that includes a wonderful April 4 essay by Studio City-Sherman Oaks Patch editor Mike Szymanski.

Szymanski was lucky enough to forge a relationship with Ebert that went much further than most such Fourth Estate brushes. It started on the red carpet of the Dorothy Chandler Pavillion in 1986 and blossomed into a fantastic same-time-next-year tradition north of the border:

We got to know each other by covering many, many film festivals together, and later found out we had a close mutual friend, [the late] Canadian-Italian journalist Angela Baldassarre, and for more than a dozen years always scheduled a dinner or lunch together no matter how busy we were during the crazy Toronto Interational Film Festival.

Read more

Chicago Sun-Times Honors Roger Ebert on Front Page

Above is today’s Chicago Sun-Times. Below are some great reads about Ebert, but trust us, keep a tissue or two nearby.

Roger Ebert Dies at 70

Roger Ebert  a legend — has died. He was 70 years old. Just yesterday, Ebert announced that his cancer had returned and that in order to deal with radiation treatments, he was going to dial down his production. But minutes ago, the Chicago Sun-Times tweeted “It is with a heavy heart we report that legendary film critic Roger Ebert (@ebertchicago) has passed away.”

Ebert had been a contributor to the Sun-Times since 1967. He wrote 15 books and in 1975, became the first film critic to win a Pulitzer Prize for Criticism. Ebert’s TV shows, such as At the Movies with Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert and Siskel and Ebert and The Movies, received many Emmy nominations. And the famous “thumbs” rating system etched a place in American culture that will never fade away.

“I believe that if, at the end of it all, according to our abilities, we have done something to make others a little happier, and something to make ourselves a little happier, that is about the best we can do,” wrote Ebert, in his memoir, Life Itself. “To make others less happy is a crime. To make ourselves unhappy is where all crime starts. We must try to contribute joy to the world. That is true no matter what our problems, our health, our circumstances. We must try.”

Mission accomplished, Mr. Ebert.

NEXT PAGE >>