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Posts Tagged ‘Rosemary Ellis’

Jane Francisco Named Editor-in-Chief of Good Housekeeping

Jane Francisco has been named editor-in-chief of Good Housekeeping. Francisco comes to the magazine from Chatelaine, a women’s lifestyle magazine in Canada. Francisco had served as its editor-in-chief since 2009. Prior to that, she served as Style at Home’s editor-in-chief.

“Jane is an incredibly versatile editor, leader and branding expert, with the experience and vision to build on the lively, friendly energy of the revamped Good Housekeeping,” said Hearst Magazines president, David Carey, in a statement.

Francisco is succeeding Rosemary Ellis, who — according to a release — is leaving Hearst to “pursue new opportunities.” “We thank Rosemary for the work she has done stewarding this brand, one of the most respected in the media industry,” said Carey.

Francisco first day at Good Housekeeping is December 2.

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Star Jones, Kerry Kennedy & Publicists APlenty

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We’re still recovering from last week’s A-list on steroids pep rally for the Giants (it was like shooting fish in a barrel — thanks, Harvey Weinstein!), but today it’s back to Michael’s for another heaping helping of the power lunch crowd. The scene was dominated by spin meisters of every stripe, social swans and money men. (Is the expense account for middle management making a comeback? Discuss.) Representing the celebrity squad was Star Jones who is always fun for a quick, dishy chat.

I was joined today by House Beautiful editor-in-chief Newell Turner, the magazine’s new food contributor Gabrielle Hamilton, who is the owner/chef of Prune, and publicist Michael McGraw. Newell, who usually eats at his desk, decided he may have to rethink his lunch plans when he spied so many Hearst colleagues sprinkled around the room. Indeed.

As a longtime reader of the magazine, I told Newell that its monthly features on the best paint colors for different types of spaces were indispensable to me when I took on the daunting task of painting the interior of our new home last year. Color, or more precisely, how to choose the best ones to enhance your living space, is one of the guiding principles of the magazine. The March ‘Green’ issue will offer a myriad of takes on how to live with the soothing shade. “Our deep-dive color issues always result in a lot of reader response,” Newell told me. He didn’t know what to expect when he devoted an entire issue to pink but was pleasantly surprised. “We had less complaints about it than when we did our ’Blue’ issue.”  In the April issue, readers will have the chance to pick “America’s Favorite Paint Color” from 10 options in a contest on HouseBeautiful.com. The results will be published in September.

Gabrielle Hamilton, Diane Clehane and Newell Turner
Gabrielle Hamilton, Diane Clehane and Newell Turner

Newell, who became top editor in 2010, decided to focus more on American designers, because “American decorating has come into its own despite the economy.” Readers seem to agree. Last year’s June and July-August issues had the highest newsstand sales since November 2002.

Newell recently brought Gabrielle on board as House Beautiful’s food contributor because, he says, “I liked her sensibility and her appreciation for good, simple food.” For her part, Gabrielle, a self-taught cook, has never fallen victim to precious, of-the-moment trends in foods. The voted Best Chef  in New York City in 2010 by the James Beard foundation, Gabrielle attributes her successful run at Prune, which she opened in 1999, to “luck” but then said, “I work very, very hard.” Somehow, she’s found time to write pieces for The New Yorker and The New York Times among many other outlets and had her book,  Blood, Bones & Butter: The Inadvertent Education of a Reluctant Chef  (Great title!) land on the Times bestseller list. “People have become obsessed with food — how it looks, how it’s prepared. Look at all the shows there are now on food preparation. I wanted to include it in the magazine in a fresh, new way,” says Newell. “Gabrielle is the perfect person to do that.”

These days, Newell is also working to develop more digital content for the mag’s website and enhanced digital edition available on iTunes. He added videos featuring the magazine’s staff in October. When developing content for that platform, he told me he guards against anything looking “too polished” because “looking a bit rougher” online lends an air of authenticity. Interestingly enough, he also revealed there is only a 7 percent crossover between House Beautiful’s print reader (the target demo is women in their 40s and 50s) and the digital reader who is younger and hipper. (Don’t shoot me; I’m just the messenger). “It’s the same content but a different voice. The digital tone is younger and a bit more irreverent.”

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. The ladies who lunched: Debbie Bancroft, Anne Hearst, Patty Smythe and Laurie Waters

2. Investigation Discovery’s president and GM, Henry Schleiff, and Kerry Kennedy

3.  ‘Mayor’ Joe Armstrong, who stopped by our table to say hello to his old pal Newell Turner and deliver an unexpected little treat to me. This ‘little birdie’ says thanks!

4. Jacqui Safra (Jean Doumanian‘s husband, in case you didn’t know)

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Al Roker, Barbara Bush and Peggy Siegal Fetes Elizabeth Olsen

1003_mockup.gifWe were disappointed to hear that we’d missed seeing Wendy Williams who’d come by on Monday for lunch with her parents. A little birdie told me that the talk show diva issued this rallying cry to mom and dad before departing to face the lone paparazzo waiting outside: “Get ready! Here we go! Here we go!”  Today the few shooters milling around outside had a little more to work with since starlet of the moment, Elizabeth Olsen, was being feted in the Garden Room. Meanwhile, the main event in the dining room featured its usual mix of moguls (Barry Diller, Ron Perelman),  talking heads (Al Roker) and high-profile editors (Jon Meacham). Just business as usual for Wednesday at Michael’s.

I was joined today by Good Housekeeping editor-in-chief Rosemary Ellis, the magazine’s new money columnist Carmen Wong Ulrich and Hearst’s executive director of public relations, Alexandra Carlin. With 24 million (yes, you read that right) readers, this is not your mother’s Good Housekeeping. With Ellis at the helm, GH is a must read for the multi-tasking, multifaceted woman (Is there any other kind?) and filled with smart, savvy content that covers everything from food and fashion to family and finances.  And, while many books have retooled their marketing message for a niche reader, Good Housekeeping is a media behemoth with some really impressive reach. “We’re not age specific. We have kazillions of 28-year-old readers and kazillions of 34-year-old readers,” says Ellis. “More than the magazines that target them.”  Rosemary, whose editor letters are often inspired by her own family life and her adorable daughter, Lucy (“I figure I have a few more years before she says no more”) says Good Housekeeping offers “one stop shopping  — Who has time to read seven different magazines?”

We all agreed that the one topic on every woman’s mind these days is money. It makes sense, says Rosemary, because 80 percent of all  spending decisions are made by the woman of the house. So, Rosemary tapped Carmen to dispense her unique brand of uncommon financial common sense culled from years of experience deciphering today’s often confusing and confounding financial landscape. “I live for this,” says Carmen, who first became interested in money through her father. “I’ve been watching stocks since I was eight.”

Carmen Wong Ulrich, Diane Clehane and Rosemary Ellis
Carmen Wong Ulrich, yours truly and Rosemary Ellis

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Jasmine Chang Joins Good Housekeeping as Fashion Director

Rosemary Ellis, editor-in-chief of Good Housekeeping, announced today in a press release that Jasmine Chang will join the magazine as Fashion Director, effective April 11.

Chang spent the previous eight years as Executive Fashion Editor at O, The Oprah Magazine. She also served as Senior Fashion Editor at Family Circle and Fashion Editor at Self magazine.

But Chang’s coolest gig ever came before all of that, when she styled Spinal Tap for their 1992 tour. We’re really hoping that she brings some of that flavor into the world of Good Housekeeping. It could only be a good thing.

InStyle Entertainment Editor Jumps To Good Housekeeping

ghk_cvr-lg.jpgCortney Pellettieri, the entertainment editor at InStyle, has been hired for the same role at Good Housekeeping, the magazine’s editor-in-chief Rosemary Ellis announced today.

Pellettieri, who will be working primarily from Los Angeles, will be in charge of gathering celebrities for covers and editorial features in the magazine starting March 1.

Prior to InStyle, Pellettieri coordinated celebrity interviews for E! Entertainment channel.

Previously: Good Housekeeping Gets New Fashion Director

Good Housekeeping Gets New Fashion Director

good housekeeping.jpgHearst-owned Good Housekeeping has a new fashion department head.

Today, the women’s magazine announced the appointment of former Family Circle senior fashion editor Christine Bibbo Herr as fashion director, starting September 14.

Prior to her work at Family Circle, where she worked for five years, Bibbo Herr worked as contributing fashion editor for Shape en Espanol, freelance market editor for Real Simple and fashion editor at For Me magazine

“Our 25 million readers rely on Good Housekeeping‘s modern and affordable fashion features,” said the magazine’s editor-in-chief, Rosemary Ellis in a statement today. “With her keen eye for fashion and design, impeccable taste, unique story ideas, and extensive knowledge of our market, Christine is a terrific addition to our team.”

Earlier: Good Housekeeping Says Forget Trends, Environment; Enlarges Mag