FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘Sally Singer’

Anna Wintour Sits Near Cool People

When the great and powerful Anna Wintour attends fashion shows, who she sits next to becomes news. Thankfully for those people who care about the butts that were closest to Wintour’s butt, The Cut has put together a great slideshow that captures it all.

Below are just a few of the people lucky enough to be near Wintour.

Please produce as many wild rumors from this list as you want. We’ve provided a couple to get you started.

  • Russell Westbrook (“Anna Wintour Mulls NBA Career”)
  • Sally Singer
  • Nicole Kidman (“Wintour on Kidman: ‘Bewitched was Awful’”)
  • Jonathan Newhouse
Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

Deborah Needleman Offered EIC Role at T: The New York Times Style Magazine

Deborah Needleman is being wooed by the New York Times. According to WWD, the Times has offered her the editor-in-chief spot at T: The New York Times Style Magazine. Needleman has been the editor of WSJ. since 2010.

Needleman denied that she had accepted the job and a Times spokesperson told WWD, “We have nothing to announce and can’t comment on the rumor.” In other words, Needleman will be the editor of T in about three weeks.

If she accepts, Needleman would succeed Sally Singer, who abruptly left T at the end of August.

Sally Singer Departs T: The New York Times Style Magazine

Sally Singer is leaving T: The New York Times Style Magazine. Singer was brought on as editor-in-chief of T in 2010, after a long run at Vogue.

“Sally’s contributions are clear to anyone who’s read the magazine during her tenure,” said Jill Abramson, executive editor of the Times, in a statement, “Gorgeous visuals, interesting stories and enterprising features — both in print and online — have been hallmarks of her stewardship. We wish her every success.”

WWD reports that there are mixed explanations regarding Singer’s departure, with some claiming she was forced out and some saying she decided to leave on her own.

A Slump at The New York Times Style Mag

T, The New York Times’ Style Magazine, is going through quite the rough patch. According to WWD, the title has seen ad pages drop in five out of its seven issues so far this year. Overall, T’s ad pages are down four percent, and therefore the “when will Sally Singer get canned” rumors are picking up steam.

Singer has been the Editor-in-Chief of T since 2010, and has been under scrutiny during almost all of her tenure. As WWD notes, Jill Abramson even “grilled her last year over declining ad sales.”

Despite Singer’s and the magazine’s struggles, a New York Times spokesperson maintained that T is “a strong performer.” We’ll see how long that viewpoint lasts.

New York Times’ Magazines See Double Digit Increase in Ad Revenue

Hugo Lindgren has gotten strong reviews for the newly designed New York Times Magazine across the board (with the possible exception of his decision to let Bill Keller write a column).

But even better than strong reviews? Making money! WWD reports that ad pages for the magazine group, including the Times’ Magazine and Sally Singer‘s T Magazine, were up 10.5% in the first quarter to 509 pages, a return to first-quarter 2009 levels.

Of course that’s nowhere near what they were in 2008, when the magazine had 858 pages in the first quarter. But let’s not get crazy. Things were real different back then.

Hopefully this will take some of the sting out of yesterday’s report that profits for the New York Times overall dropped 57%. We all need to heal.

Sally Singer on the Relevance of Vogue

singerhs.jpgFBNY’s Diane Clehane interviewed Vogue‘s Sally Singer for a ‘So What Do You Do?’ feature currently running on mediabistro.com’s homepage. In it Singer responds to Cathy Horyn‘s NYT recent piece bemoaning the lack of relevance at Vogue:

I was in India when Cathy’s piece came out, so I didn’t read it at the time; I can’t comment directly on what she said, but I obviously disagree wholly with that. When I started at American Vogue, Style.com hadn’t even started. There’s now far more information in the world about fashion. You couldn’t know the name of the 14-year-old Eastern bloc model the day after she appeared in the Prada show, unless you were at the show. When I was at New York and you had to shoot a look from Ann Demeulemeester, you had to go to the showroom, put the pieces together, and Polaroid them. There wasn’t even a look book, let alone a Web site to show you how it was worn. It’s changed completely. Anyone who is interested in clothes right now knows the clothes almost as soon as I do. That changes the way you report on clothes and changes the way you show clothes. It makes what we do more relevant than ever, because you actually need someone to edit it down for you. You need people now not to tell you what was at Prada, but to tell you why it was at Prada and how you’re going to wear it. American Vogue is very good at explaining to American women — and by extension, women around the world who want to dress like American women — why they should wear what they wear, and how they should wear it.

You can read the whole interview — as well as, find out what it’s like to have Anna Wintour as a boss — here.