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Posts Tagged ‘Sam Slovick’

Mission & State Open for Investigative & Narrative Business

Mission & State, the much anticipated content operation headed by former Slake Media founder and LA Weekly editor Joe Donnelly, promises “narrative journalism from the heart of Santa Barbara.” Among the articles dotting today’s official website launch is a shining freelance example by Jervey Tervalon of that motto.

The New Orleans born, LA raised Tervalon was very much an African-American anomaly when he decided to study at UCSB in the 1970s. He frames the city’s homogeneous demographics with various anecdotes and reminiscences, including this ugly and embarrassing SBPD episode:

Not that Santa Barbara was immune from the sort of de rigueur profiling we were used to back in Los Angeles. I speak, of course, of the infamous Harlem Globetrotters arrests in 1984 when Santa Barbara’s finest, in a desperate search for black men of average height who had pulled a jewelry heist on State Street, apprehended at gunpoint three Globetrotters who happened to average 6 feet, 5 inches.

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Documentary Series on OccupyLA Launches Online

Longtime LA Weekly journalist Sam Slovick partnered with TakePart and Slake to put out a five-part documentary series on OccupyLA called Scenes from the New Revolution. Part 1 is posted above.

Slovick covered the LA City Hall occupation for the two months before it was famously squashed by the LAPD last month. More info on Slovick’s project here.

Sam Slovick On the Homophobia that Threatened Slake’s Second Issue

Yesterday, Fishbowl LA reported that the upcoming issue of Slake had been delayed by two to three weeks because various printers across the United States refused to publish the book–citing “explicit material” from Sam Slovick‘s story “Tommy Crow,” which contains one line depicting gay sex.

This is the line in question:

“We sit in silence in the backseat for an hour before he spits in my hand, rubs it on my dick and slides it in his ass.”

The printers had no objections to several graphic descriptions of heterosexual sex in the book. We asked Slovick about the blatant homophobia at play. He responded that while he’s faced homophobia before, he never expected get any flack over “Tommy Crow.”

“It never occurred to me that there was anything offensive in there,” he says. “This is a love story–a first love story. It’s semi-autobiographical…I understand the homophobic matrix. It’s not interesting. It’s kind of redundant. I don’t pay any attention to it. But this comes from left field.”

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Homophobic Printers Held Up Slake’s Second Issue

At long last, the second issue of Slake is back from the printer and will be unveiled at an event at the Track 16 gallery on January, 22. We here at Fishbowl LA were more than excited when we got the press release, but were a bit confused when we noticed it contained the following odd caveat:

Slake No. 2 was delayed when several domestic facilities refused to print the book over concerns about Sam Slovick’s short story ‘Tommy Crow,’ which includes a brief sex scene between two gay teenagers.”

We called Slake‘s Joe Donnelly and Laurie Ochoa for an explanation.

“We have a print broker, and they have clients they use for print jobs,” Donnelly told us. “We’d been scheduled to print in Illinois. But the day we were supposed to go to press–the same day Obama signed the DADT repeal as it happens–we got a call from our broker saying there was an ‘interesting development.’

The Illinois printer refused to print the work due to a line depicting gay sex. Slake‘s broker sent the issue to clients in New Mexico and Kentucky, “but the material was ‘too explicit,’” says Donnelly. “One or two lines in a 6,000 word story.”

So what was the offending prose?

“We sit in silence in the backseat for an hour before he spits in my hand, rubs it on my dick and slides it in his ass.”

Really? That’s it?

“If it were a teenage boy and girl and no one would care,” insists Ochoa, noting that one story in the same issue has a sex scene far more graphic than Slovick’s, depicting heterosexual sex. The printers had no objection on that one.

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GOOD’s: Nov/Dec High Tech Low Tech

GOOD-Cover-NovDec-07.jpg

GOOD’s High Tech/Low Tech issue hits the magazine racks, and here’s a peek inside:

Bruce Bueno de Mesquita The New Nostradamus?
Michael Lerner profiles the man some think is the most brilliant foreign policy analyst, and others think is a wacko. Cool.

Morgan Clendaniel looks at Second Life. We’re sick of Second Life. Can’t someone invent a virtual plague and kill the place off?

Sam Slovick is guided by a 12 year-old through Skid Row. It reads quite a bit like a piece he wrote for Whole Life Times, last June. His LA Weekly piece on the same subject was criticized by Brady Westwater, who would be a great subject for GOOD.

If It Ain’t Broke explores seven practices that haven’t changed much over time for one simple reason: they got it right on the first try. One of these is prostitution and another is hanging. Good grief.

GOOD is having their first anniversary party this Friday, so subscribe and RSVP, in that order, please.