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Posts Tagged ‘Sarah Marshall’

Digital First Media Exec Touts the Power of Mobile Video

All sorts of fascinating info has been coming out of this week’s World Publishing Expo in Berlin. Among those keeping tabs on the proceedings and in some cases sharing Google docs via Twitter about the presentations has been journalism.co.uk’s Sarah Marshall.

JohnPatonBerlinToday, Digital First Media CEO John Paton spoke about his company’s expanding reliance on TOUT, a video App the Wall Street Journal started making use of in 2012. Other media companies running with the technology include CNN, ESPN and UK’s The Sun newspaper. The Digital First Media effort encompasses 1800 reporters:

The mobile video App is now used in 75 Digital First Media newsrooms. Journalists create and publish videos on the move in near real-time, with most going live in about 30 seconds.

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Livefyre Snaps Up Storify

Lifefyre, a company with offices in New York and San Francisco, already counts among its clients the New York Times, Conde Nast and the Wall Street Journal. The social media platform’s client base has suddenly become much larger and is set to now grow at an even faster pace.

Per a release tipped by journalism.co.uk’s Sarah Marshall, Livefyre has acquired the popular social media storytelling tool Storify for undisclosed terms:

“Acquiring Storify made perfect sense,” says Jordan Kretchmer, founder and chief of Livefyre. “Livefyre powers social media and user engagement on the largest media properties and brands on the web. Storify also delivers a unique and vital curation tool for journalists and editors at many of those same companies…”

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Breaking Down NYT’s Latest Immersive Offering ‘The Jockey’

Another great behind-the-presses feature from journalism.co.uk technology editor Sarah Marshall. She talked to Pulitzer Prize winning reporter Barry Bearak and New York Times associate managing editor Steve Duenes about “The Jokey,” the paper’s race-track themed follow-up to “Snowfall.”

Former NYT sports editor Joe Sexton hatched the idea of a profile piece of 50,000+ races jockey Russell Baze. It took a long time to come together, which was fortuitous, because when Baze finally said yes, “Snowfall” had just run and generated major traction:

Videographer and photographer Chang Lee was brought in and, along with graphics editor Xaquín GV, set up a complicated shoot, involving Baze wearing a miniature Pivothead camera on his goggles to provide point-of-view video footage, and 15 GoPro cameras around the track to capture the jockey racing…

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New York Times Experiments with Reader Comments

It started over the weekend with Pulitzer Prize winner Amy Harmon‘s article “A Race to Save the Orange by Altering Its DNA.” Along the right-hand side of the Web version, several reader comments have been pulled and highlighted under the heading Readers’ Perspectives.

The paper’s deputy editor of interactive news, Marc Lavallee, tells journalism.co.uk that the approach is designed mainly for readers who do not take the time to wade through reader comments. At press time, Harmon’s GMO-flavored item had 736 reader reactions. From journalism.co.uk technology editor Sarah Marshall‘s piece:

The comments were elevated from below the line, placed alongside the story in a similar style to how Times‘much-discussed Snowfall presentation uses pull quotes and and visual pointers alongside the main narrative.

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Journalism Site Checks In with LAT’s ‘Robot Reporters’

Sarah Marshall shares a couple of fascinating new examples at journalism.co.uk of the algorithm-assisted reporting being perfected at the LA Times under the watchful eye of database producer Ben Welsh (pictured).

The first is an early-morning Ken Schwencke-bylined item on February 1 about a 5.2 magnitude earthquake that hit SoCal. Even though the reporter was still in bed, he was first to the news:

“Ken wrote the algorithm that sits on top of earthquake notifications,” Welsh explained. “The structured data comes in and Ken has an algorithm that says if the earthquake is close to California and over a certain magnitude it is ‘news’.”

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