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Posts Tagged ‘Scott Dadich’

Christopher Nolan to Guest Edit Wired

Christopher Nolan, most well known as the man who brought Bane — and thus the Bane voice you won’t stop using with coworkers — to the big screen with his Batman trilogy, is the new guest editor of Wired.

According to Wired’s editor Scott Dadich [pictured next to Nolan, who is explaining that peace has cost Wired its strength; victory has defeated it] the issue will carry themes from Nolan’s films as well as “Time, Space and Multiple Dimensions.”

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Wired and USC Launch Online Masters Class

Wired_logoWired is teaming up with USC to launch an online Master’s degree in integrated design, business and technology. The goal of the course is to “educate creative thinkers and technologists to better equip them to transform the world of industry and enterprise,” according to a release.

“We’ve been thinking for years about what a university curriculum with WIRED would look like, and now we have a chance to build it with a terrific partner,” said Wired’s editor-in-chief, Scott Dadich, in a statement. “Taking the best from USC and Wired, we can teach discipline and disruption, business fundamentals, and the very latest innovation models from Silicon Valley. This is going to be thrilling.”

Students who sign up for the course will have access to Wired’s headquarters and its editors and writers. The first offering of the degree will come in the 2015/2016 academic year.

Wired Plans ‘Live Magazine’ Event

Wired is getting into the festival scene. WxD will be a two day “live magazine” event put on by Wired to celebrate the best in design and culture. Picture Coachella, minus the drugs and pseudo-hippies with awful clothes, but add nerds and architecture fans.

WxD will coincide with Wired’s October Design issue. It will be held September 29 in Marin County, California. A few of the confirmed participants include Aaron Koblin, Google’s creative director of data arts; Wyatt Mitchell, The New Yorker’s creative director; Jeff Nichols, director of Mud and other films; and Sia, the singer/songwriter.

“Whether you’re creating a visual interface, cutting an album, or developing a tasting menu, design shapes the human experience,” said Scott Dadich, Wired’s editor, in a statement. “We recognized an opportunity to broaden the definition of design and learn from the people who are changing the way we communicate, socialize, and enjoy food, film, and music.”

Plus, everyone likes a good excuse to party.

Joe Brown Returns to Wired

Joe Brown, most recently the top editor of Gawker Media’s Gizmodo, is returning to Wired. Brown has been named New York editor, a new role at the magazine. Brown previously worked in Wired’s San Francisco offices from 2007 to 2010.

Aside from running wired.com in the morning, Brown will be responsible for building a New York editorial team, which will include a senior editor.

“Joe is a smart, aggressive, agenda-setting editor,” said Scott Dadich, editor-in-chief of Wired, in a statement. “We could not be happier that he’s joining us in New York.”

No word yet on who will replace Brown at Gizmodo.

Wired Makes a Few Editorial Changes

Wired, under the new leadership of editor-in-chief Scott Dadich, has made some changes. Below are the highlights.

  • Jason Tanz has been named executive editor
  • Robert Capps has been named deputy editor, overseeing Wired’s front of book
  • Mark McClusky has been named editorial development director, a new role at Wired. McClusky will be tasked with expanding and improving the magazine’s web, tablet and video platforms
  • Adam Rogers has been named articles editor. Rogers will work closely with Capps on Wired’s front of book

Scott Dadich Named EIC of Wired

Scott Dadich has been named the new editor-in-chief of Wired. This marks a return to Wired for Dadich, who served as the magazine’s creative director from 2006 to 2010. During his time there Wired won three straight NMA’s for Design. Dadich most recently served as Condé Nast’s vice president of editorial platforms.

“Scott has been at the forefront of the company’s digital innovation for the past three years, developing the design for a digital magazine that has become an industry standard,” said Condé’s editorial director, Tom Wallace, in a statement. “His return to Wired, where he served as creative director and won three National Magazine Awards for Design, will ensure that it continues its pace-setting growth.”

“I’m excited to return to Wired, which has had such a tremendous impact on my life and my career,” Dadich said, in a statement. “I’m honored to have the chance to build on the legacy of innovation that Louis and Jane started some 20 years ago. And I am grateful to my friend and colleague Chris and the incredible Wired staff. I look forward to finding new opportunities to delight and surprise the Wired community, both with the stories we tell and in the ways in which we tell them.”

Dadich succeeds Chris Anderson, who left to dedicate more time to his robotics company.

New Yorker iPhone App is On its Way

The New Yorker is getting pocket sized. The New York Post reports that the magazine will be the first Condé Nast brand to launch an iPhone app, and it might be here as soon as early September.

For now, not much is known about the app. Scott Dadich, Vice President of Content Innovation at Condé, denied having a launch date in mind, and Pamela McCarthy, Deputy Editor at The New Yorker, didn’t give any details either. “There is reason to think that everything we offer on the iPad will also be offered on the iPhone,” she told the Post.

Either way, the app is on its way. Just remember: No one thinks New Yorker cartoons are funny, so showing them off while you’re out and about isn’t going to impress anyone.

Creative Direction of Tablets Gives Publishers Pause

When designing a magazine app for a tablet, is it best for it to be simple or complicated? The answer to that question is giving companies plenty to think about. Adweek reports that while some publishing houses claimed readers want their apps pared down, others felt that would be a step in the wrong direction.

Authorities at Time and Hearst explained that the KISS principle is the best approach. Steve Sachs, Time’s Executive Vice President of Consumer Marketing and Sales, said, “Interactive elements are valuable to [readers], but they’re a secondary benefit.” Chris Wilkes, the Vice President of Hearst’s App Lab agreed, and added that if an app has too many extras they could end up annoying readers.

Scott Dadich, the Executive Director of Digital Magazine Development at Condé Nast, didn’t see it that way at all. “It’s more effort, it’s more expense, but it does bear out in engagement,” said Dadich. “Something like a GQ, seeing models on a fashion shoot, or seeing the clothes move — there’s definitely value in that.” In line with Dadich’s thinking, the highest rated apps are often those that are also thoroughly enhanced.

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Gossip From The Condé Nast Holiday Luncheon

The first thing you need to understand when discussing the Condé Nast luncheon yesterday is that it was just a lunch. Luncheon is just a rich person word for lunch. With that out of the way, let’s get to some of the more notable moments from the meal at the Four Seasons.

The New York Post reports that everyone was in pretty good spirits. Charles Townsend, the CEO of Condé, said, “We had a very good year — up in high single digits,” and said the company’s digital business was doing well.  Si Newhouse was sitting at a table with Scott Dadich, David RemnickBrandon Holley and a few others. This seating arrangement can mean something or nothing. Feel free to pick one and spread those thoughts to everyone you know.

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The New Yorker Names First Creative Director

The New Yorker has named Wyatt Mitchell its first Creative Director. Mitchell was most recently Condé Nast’s Digital Design Director. Pam McCarthy, Deputy Editor at the magazine, told WWD that a Creative Director was needed because the brand has expanded.

“Now so many new needs have exploded in so many different directions over the last 18 months that we needed something more,” explained Mitchell. “Wyatt’s command of digital technology, like his command of print, is so strong and is sure.”

Mitchell will join the New Yorker by the end of the year.

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