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Posts Tagged ‘Scott Dadich’

Wired Plans ‘Live Magazine’ Event

Wired is getting into the festival scene. WxD will be a two day “live magazine” event put on by Wired to celebrate the best in design and culture. Picture Coachella, minus the drugs and pseudo-hippies with awful clothes, but add nerds and architecture fans.

WxD will coincide with Wired’s October Design issue. It will be held September 29 in Marin County, California. A few of the confirmed participants include Aaron Koblin, Google’s creative director of data arts; Wyatt Mitchell, The New Yorker’s creative director; Jeff Nichols, director of Mud and other films; and Sia, the singer/songwriter.

“Whether you’re creating a visual interface, cutting an album, or developing a tasting menu, design shapes the human experience,” said Scott Dadich, Wired’s editor, in a statement. “We recognized an opportunity to broaden the definition of design and learn from the people who are changing the way we communicate, socialize, and enjoy food, film, and music.”

Plus, everyone likes a good excuse to party.

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Joe Brown Returns to Wired

Joe Brown, most recently the top editor of Gawker Media’s Gizmodo, is returning to Wired. Brown has been named New York editor, a new role at the magazine. Brown previously worked in Wired’s San Francisco offices from 2007 to 2010.

Aside from running wired.com in the morning, Brown will be responsible for building a New York editorial team, which will include a senior editor.

“Joe is a smart, aggressive, agenda-setting editor,” said Scott Dadich, editor-in-chief of Wired, in a statement. “We could not be happier that he’s joining us in New York.”

No word yet on who will replace Brown at Gizmodo.

Wired Makes a Few Editorial Changes

Wired, under the new leadership of editor-in-chief Scott Dadich, has made some changes. Below are the highlights.

  • Jason Tanz has been named executive editor
  • Robert Capps has been named deputy editor, overseeing Wired’s front of book
  • Mark McClusky has been named editorial development director, a new role at Wired. McClusky will be tasked with expanding and improving the magazine’s web, tablet and video platforms
  • Adam Rogers has been named articles editor. Rogers will work closely with Capps on Wired’s front of book

Scott Dadich Named EIC of Wired

Scott Dadich has been named the new editor-in-chief of Wired. This marks a return to Wired for Dadich, who served as the magazine’s creative director from 2006 to 2010. During his time there Wired won three straight NMA’s for Design. Dadich most recently served as Condé Nast’s vice president of editorial platforms.

“Scott has been at the forefront of the company’s digital innovation for the past three years, developing the design for a digital magazine that has become an industry standard,” said Condé’s editorial director, Tom Wallace, in a statement. “His return to Wired, where he served as creative director and won three National Magazine Awards for Design, will ensure that it continues its pace-setting growth.”

“I’m excited to return to Wired, which has had such a tremendous impact on my life and my career,” Dadich said, in a statement. “I’m honored to have the chance to build on the legacy of innovation that Louis and Jane started some 20 years ago. And I am grateful to my friend and colleague Chris and the incredible Wired staff. I look forward to finding new opportunities to delight and surprise the Wired community, both with the stories we tell and in the ways in which we tell them.”

Dadich succeeds Chris Anderson, who left to dedicate more time to his robotics company.

New Yorker iPhone App is On its Way

The New Yorker is getting pocket sized. The New York Post reports that the magazine will be the first Condé Nast brand to launch an iPhone app, and it might be here as soon as early September.

For now, not much is known about the app. Scott Dadich, Vice President of Content Innovation at Condé, denied having a launch date in mind, and Pamela McCarthy, Deputy Editor at The New Yorker, didn’t give any details either. “There is reason to think that everything we offer on the iPad will also be offered on the iPhone,” she told the Post.

Either way, the app is on its way. Just remember: No one thinks New Yorker cartoons are funny, so showing them off while you’re out and about isn’t going to impress anyone.

Creative Direction of Tablets Gives Publishers Pause

When designing a magazine app for a tablet, is it best for it to be simple or complicated? The answer to that question is giving companies plenty to think about. Adweek reports that while some publishing houses claimed readers want their apps pared down, others felt that would be a step in the wrong direction.

Authorities at Time and Hearst explained that the KISS principle is the best approach. Steve Sachs, Time’s Executive Vice President of Consumer Marketing and Sales, said, “Interactive elements are valuable to [readers], but they’re a secondary benefit.” Chris Wilkes, the Vice President of Hearst’s App Lab agreed, and added that if an app has too many extras they could end up annoying readers.

Scott Dadich, the Executive Director of Digital Magazine Development at Condé Nast, didn’t see it that way at all. “It’s more effort, it’s more expense, but it does bear out in engagement,” said Dadich. “Something like a GQ, seeing models on a fashion shoot, or seeing the clothes move — there’s definitely value in that.” In line with Dadich’s thinking, the highest rated apps are often those that are also thoroughly enhanced.

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Gossip From The Condé Nast Holiday Luncheon

The first thing you need to understand when discussing the Condé Nast luncheon yesterday is that it was just a lunch. Luncheon is just a rich person word for lunch. With that out of the way, let’s get to some of the more notable moments from the meal at the Four Seasons.

The New York Post reports that everyone was in pretty good spirits. Charles Townsend, the CEO of Condé, said, “We had a very good year — up in high single digits,” and said the company’s digital business was doing well.  Si Newhouse was sitting at a table with Scott Dadich, David RemnickBrandon Holley and a few others. This seating arrangement can mean something or nothing. Feel free to pick one and spread those thoughts to everyone you know.

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The New Yorker Names First Creative Director

The New Yorker has named Wyatt Mitchell its first Creative Director. Mitchell was most recently Condé Nast’s Digital Design Director. Pam McCarthy, Deputy Editor at the magazine, told WWD that a Creative Director was needed because the brand has expanded.

“Now so many new needs have exploded in so many different directions over the last 18 months that we needed something more,” explained Mitchell. “Wyatt’s command of digital technology, like his command of print, is so strong and is sure.”

Mitchell will join the New Yorker by the end of the year.

Condé Nast May Start Giving More Free App Downloads

At a Condé Nast town hall meeting yesterday morning, the idea of more free app downloads, like the Adobe-sponsored May issue of Wired, was kicked around, according to the New York Post.

The big proponent of apps at Condé Nast is Scott Dadich, vice president of digital development, whose success in developing the first app for Wired got him the job of all app development for the company. Wired readers downloaded more than 105,000 paid editions for the first issue last June, compared to the 80,000 or so magazines purchased at the newsstands. Even better, without all the shipping and printing costs, publishers saw a bigger cut — even taking into account the 30% that went to Apple.

But then sales dropped off sharply, averaging about 27,369 a month, which translates into a little over a $100,000 per month in revenue — not enough to fund the content.

Free app downloads may help boost traffic for publications. And although Condé Nast is continuing to charge per issue, this may be a sign that it’s rethinking whether or not paid issues are the only way to save publishing.

Wired’s New Creative Director: ‘I Have to Perform.’

It’s never easy taking over for someone who does a particular job extremely well. When Val Kilmer replaced Michael Keaton in the 90′s Batman film series it was awkward and weird. Yes, the decision to add creepy nipples to the bat suit didn’t help, but Kilmer just didn’t live up to the expectations we had, set by Keaton’s stellar performance.

For Brandon Kavulla, this is his Batman moment. Wired, under the guidance of  its former Creative Director Scott Dadich, became known for its bold, attention grabbing design. Since Dadich moved on to work on digital platforms at Condé Nast, the job of keeping the magazine’s look interesting has fallen to Kavulla.

He at least seems to recognize the big shoes he has to fill, as he tells WWD today that he’s nervous about the future:

I think any magazine you take on, if you don’t feel intimidated or feel like, ‘Oh, man, I really got to do some great stuff,’ you’re not being realistic. It’s like a musician who’s been getting on stage all his life and is still nervous getting up there — people paid for the tickets, and I have to perform.

Kavulla – who adds that he’s going to simplify the magazine’s look in the next few months  – certainly has his work cut out for him. Only time will tell if he ends up pulling a Keaton or a Kilmer.

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