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Posts Tagged ‘Seventeen’

Seventeen Makes Two Editorial Changes

Seventeen is making two editorial changes. The magazine has named Caitlin Moscatello its new Deputy Editor, and Kimberly Tranell has been promoted from Health Editor to Senior Editor.

Moscatello joins Seventeen from Redbook, where she served as Senior Editor. She has also worked at The Knot and Shape. Tranell has been with Seventeen since 2008.

Moscatello begins on June 4 and Tranell’s appointment is effective immediately.

The A-List Returns! Barbara Walters, Charlie Rose, Barry Diller Hold Court at Michael’s

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As Januarys go, this one has been a bit of a snoozer, but things are finally picking up now that the boldface names have returned to their regular perches at Michael’s. The joint was jumping today as morning talkers (Charlie Rose, Barbara Walters), media moguls (Barry Diller) and fashionistas (Marie Claire‘s Joanna Coles) were all in full power lunch mode. It’s about time!

I was joined today by Seventeen editor-in-chief Ann Shoket and Hearst executive director of public relations Alexandra Carlin. It’s been a while since Seventeen was required reading in my house (I still remember begging my father to drive me to the stationary store,  so I could be the first to get the magazine’s coveted September back to school issue). Back then, I’d devour every oversize page, finding tons of inspiration and validation about surviving the treacherous teenage years in one piece — and in style.

Well, the more things change, the more they stay the same. Ann, who celebrated her fifth anniversary with the magazine last week, says she feels a “huge responsibility” to readers, which means addressing the issues they care most about (a tall order to say the least). Between dealing with ‘sextortion’ (boyfriends threatening to dump girls if they don’t submit sexually) and the barrage of unrealistic images of physical perfection all around them, today’s teenage girls, says Ann, are under “huge pressure” all while dealing with the requisite drama that comes with being a high school girl.  Seventeen‘s mission is to empower teenage girls (the average reader is 16), often by reporting on celebrities who can be a source of inspiration.  For next month’s cover, the magazine scored the first interview with a post-rehab Demi Lovato who opens up about how she battled back from anorexia, bulimia, bipolar disorder and cutting. “Demi was amazing. It’s so refreshing to have a celebrity be honest about their struggles. It’s great for girls to read about someone like that.”

Diane Clehane, Ann Shoket and Alexandra Carlin
Diane Clehane, Ann Shoket and Alexandra Carlin

Seventeen, says Ann, is also a resource for girls about subjects they might want to talk about with their parents, but can’t. Topic A: ‘Digital Drama’ – the magazine’s clever moniker for ‘cyber bullying’ which “sounds so nineties.” Seventeen is so committed to wiping out the epidemic that Ann created the ‘Delete Digital Drama’ campaign for the magazine. “We only had to deal with the mean girl phone calls, but today social media has created so many more outlets for bullying to happen. It’s a serious problem.”

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Most Popular FishbowlNY Stories for the Week

Here’s a look at what FishbowlNY stories made the most buzz this week.

  1. Reporter Who Blew Whistle on News of the World Scandal Found Dead, July 18
  2. Whitney Houston, Others Grace the Covers in Seventeen’s Archives, July 18
  3. A Quick Look at Vogue‘s Annual “Age  Issue,” July 19
  4. As Merlin Media Moves Forward at 101.9, Emmis Takes WRXP to Web, July 19
  5. Len Berman Drops WOR, Replaced by WNBC’s Bruce Beck, July 18
  6. The Wall Street Journal‘s Editorial on Hacking Scandal is a Joke, July 18
  7. 101.9 Adds Jock Dave Packer, Gives Rumor to News/Music Hybrid Format, July 18
  8. War of Words with New York State Broadcasters Association and Family of William B. Williams, July 18

 
Keep up-to-date with the latest FishbowlNY news. Click here to sign-up for the FishbowlNY daily newsletter, bringing you our articles each afternoon directly to your inbox.

Whitney Houston, Others Grace The Covers in Seventeen’s Archives

Did you know that Whitney Houston once appeared on the cover of Seventeen? Well, now you do – that’s her on the right in an amazingly long shirt thing that (sadly) is probably being worn by someone walking the streets of the Lower East Side right now.

The magazine has unveiled a huge collection of its covers to celebrate its 65th anniversary, and the young celebrities featured are surprising and sometimes fairly odd (Will Smith and Robert Redford!).

There’s Shannen Doherty, Jennifer Connelly, Cameron Diaz and even Claire Danes, obviously riding the My So Called Life high.

Not only are there a lot of celebrities, there’s some covers that stand out just because of the concept. In April of 1945, the issue was titled “Girl Meets Boy,” and the cover showed a girl and a guy engaged in a game of cat’s cradle. Apparently games played with string really got the sexual tension going back then.

Seventeen Pushes Luxury Message

Adweek is reporting that the April style guide for Hearst’s Seventeen will feature more high-end products than usual for the magazine. The issue will include items like a pair of $400 Marc Jacob shoes, something that sounds a bit out of reach for most teens.

Ann Shoket, Editor-in-Chief of Seventeen, tells Adweek that the expensive items are merely showing readers options:

We 100 percent do not want to alienate our readers who want to shop at accessible price points. We always want to be at reach for our readers…But there’s something to be said for delicious designer splurges. This style guide was a real reaction to that.

Shoket is right, there’s plenty to be said about delicious designer splurges. FishbowlNY would start with “Maybe Seventeen can leave out the splurges since most of America’s teens aren’t able to afford them, much less their parents, which makes parents’ jobs tougher than it already is because now the shoes the teens can afford are suddenly uncool” and go from there.

Seventeen‘s Ann Shoket on Her Role in the Launch of Mediabistro

Ann Shoket is no stranger to this thing called the Internet. Before becoming editor-in-chief of Seventeen, she published her own e-zine, launched CosmoGirl! online, and suggested to mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby that she launch a media community web site.

Although she calls her time as an entrepreneur “fun and interesting,” Shoket says the Web actually hasn’t changed much since 1996. “We didn’t make a dime, and we spent an incredible amount of time in all sorts of silly pursuits.”

Uh, yeah. Pretty much sounds like today.

Part 1: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says ‘The Web is Not Eating Our Lunch’

Part 2: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says Editors Need to Think Beyond the Page

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Seventeen‘s Ann Shoket: Editors Need to Think Beyond the Page

If the thought of working for Seventeen conjures images of attending VIP events for “research,” being able to expense your lipstick addiction, and generally basking in the glow of crazy, insane, delicious, wonderful, fun on a daily basis, you’re right.

Seriously, editor-in-chief Ann Shoket says the biggest thing she looks for in new hires is an “ability to think surround” by considering social media outreach, advertising partners, and possible Web content for all articles. “A magazine story doesn’t resonate if it’s just on the page,” she says.

Part 1: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says “The Web is Not Eating Our Lunch”

Part 3: Media Beat: Ann Shoket’s Role in the Launch of mediabistro.com

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Seventeen‘s Ann Shoket: ‘The Web is Not Eating Our Lunch’

Know of any young people who get their news from the daily paper or monthly magazine? Nah, me neither. So you’d think that, out of all the publications folding left and right, those in the teen category would be suffering more than most.

Not true, says Ann Shoket, editor-in-chief of Seventeen. Not only does she refuse to buy into the print-is-dying belief, she says the 66-year-old publication actually gained readers in the coveted under-21 set during the recession. “The Web is not eating our lunch. We don’t have a readership problem. We are not losing our readership to the Web,” says Shoket. “Girls love the Internet, absolutely, but the Internet brings us readers.”

Watch the first installment of our interview for more details on the “Seventeen everywhere” philosophy and Shoket’s take on the current fashion-magazine-as-reality-show trend.

Part 2: Media Beat: Ann Shoket Says Editors Need to Think Beyond the Page

Part 3: Media Beat: Ann Shoket’s Role in the Launch of mediabistro.com

Media Beat is mediabistro.com’s interview series with the movers and shakers of the media world. View all past episodes at MediaBeat.com.

Two Gourmet Staffers Join Former Publisher At Marie Claire

marie claire jan.jpgThe death of Cond&eacute Nast‘s award-winning Gourmet might already exist in the “things that happened last year” category, but the ghost of the beloved title still lingers in today’s stories.

Consider the announcement from Marie Claire today, which mentions that the U.S. edition of the magazine has just hired two new ad executives to work with Nancy Berger Cardone, the vice president and publisher of the Hearst mag. Both Diane DePaul and Anne Yost Carroll come from previous jobs at both Allure and Gourmet, where Cardone was formerly vice president and publisher. The new appointments bring DePaul on at the women’s magazine as associate publisher/advertising while Carroll will serve as account director. DePaul and Carroll are replacing Tami Eagle Bowling and Rachel Schauman, respectively, who are both leaving the company, today’s announcement said.

Prior to working as associate publisher at Allure, which she left in 2008 to join Gourmet, DePaul worked as associate publisher for Seventeen and advertising director for Soap Opera Digest/Soap Opera Weekly. Carroll has previously worked at Health magazine and advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi.

Cardone is not hiding her hiring favoritism, saying in a statement: “I’ve worked closely with Diane and Anne at both Gourmet and Allure, and I am thrilled to bring them on as part of the Marie Claire team. Their industry experience and energy will be essential to the continued success of the brand.”

Previously: Gourmet Publisher Finds A Home At Marie Claire

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Seventeen‘s Jamison: Capitalizing On Multi-Platform Content

seventeendec.jpgWith a young, tech-savvy audience, Seventeen is the perfect outlet to try new digital content. In fact, publisher Jayne Jamison told FishbowlNY, the magazine already employs lots of cross-platform packages, including “Beauty Smarties”, who create make-up tutorial videos for seventeen.com and also contribute to the magazine.

“Video is huge on our Web site,” Jamison said.

“Most months we have about one million video plays. We’re both creating video content off of the pages of the magazine, like beauty smarties, and creating new video content for the Web. We’re also encouraging advertisers to make videos.”

The magazine’s print content also drives readers to the Web site, with at least 40 “editorial Web prompts” in every issue. “For us, it works both ways,” Jamison explained. “We have sold more than half a million subscriptions on the Web this year. In our company [Hearst], we’re number one in that regard, and that is important in reaffirming the power of print. The Web offers us great opportunities for sweepstakes and polls and quizzes.”

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