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Posts Tagged ‘Sid Holt’

Graydon Carter Named to Magazine Editors Hall of Fame

Graydon Carter, the longtime Vanity Fair editor, has been elected to the American Society of Magazine Editors’ Hall of Fame. He’ll be honored at a ceremony at the Marquis on May 1.

Carter has been in the magazine business for many years. He was a staff writer at Time and Life, and co-founded Spy in 1986. Carter served as the editor of The New York Observer before jumping to what would ultimately cement his legacy — editing VF. He has held that spot since 1992. During Carter’s span as VF’s editor, the title has won 14 National Magazine Awards; two for General Excellence.

“Few journalists are as influential — and as well known — as Graydon Carter,” said Sid Holt, ASME’s CEO, in a statement. “All you have to do is look around in print and online to see the lasting influence of Spy, the magazine he co-founded and edited in the 1980s. As the editor of Vanity Fair for the last two decades, he has continued to have an outsize impact not only on magazine journalism but also on American culture.”

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ASME Says Criticism of Nominations is ‘Kind of Silly’

Yesterday, when FishbowlNY covered the 2012 National Magazine Award finalists, we expected the typical backlash against the major publishing houses and our fine city. While there was some of that, many people took the ASME to task for the noticeable lack of women writers.

As Ann Friedman — the Executive Editor of GOOD noted, “Women hold their own or dominate in servicey categories (public interest, personal service) and fiction. They are not represented at all in the categories of reporting, feature writing, profile writing, essays and criticism, columns and commentary.” Alyssa Rosenberg, writing for Think Progress, added that the “women’s” category ends up hurting female writers:

The division in General Excellence creates an incentive for women’s magazines to genuinely specialize their coverage across the board, while men’s magazines have incentives to commission features and criticism that compete with publications like the New Yorker and The Atlantic.

Sid Holt, the ASME’s Chief Executive, brushed off the criticism. He wrote to Poynter and said it was all “Kind of silly,” went through the selection process and cited past nominations as proof that there is no bias:

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The Controversy over Harper’s Win for Best Reporting at the Ellie

On of the major upsets at the National Magazine Awards this week was the “Reporting” award, which went to Harper’s for Scott Horton‘s “The Guantanamo ‘Suicides’.” The piece had a mixed reception when it was published; moreover, it was up against two standout articles — not just of this year but of any year — the Rolling Stone article “The Runaway General” by Michael Hastings (that led to the resignation of Gen. Stanley McChrystal), and The New Yorker exposé of the Koch brothers by Jane Mayer.

Horton’s piece begins with the premise that not only has President Obama failed to close Guantanamo, he may be more implicated in horrors that have occurred there than has previously come to light. It begins:

[N]ew evidence…suggests the current administration failed to investigate seriously—and may even have continued—a cover-up of the possible homicides of three prisoners at Guantánamo in 2006.

Joe Pompeo at The Cutline gathered up some of the reactions around the media. Slate’s media critic, Jack Shafer, had the most biting criticism over the win:

I am dumbfounded. The Harper’s piece is a souffle of conjecture. Did the judges actually read it? Do they really think the Obama administration is covering up murders committed during the Bush administration?

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“Magazine of the Year” Finalists Announced for the 2011 National Magazine Awards

The American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) announced today the 2011 Magazine of the Year finalists. The five finalists are The Atlantic, Backpacker, Foreign Policy, National Geographic, and Wired.

“The National Magazine Awards introduced the Magazine of the Year category just last year to honor magazines that have achieved distinction in print, online and on tablets and smartphones,” said Sid Holt, Chief Executive of ASME.

Last week ASME announced the finalists for the other awards categories, with The New Yorker leading the pack with nine nominations, followed by New York magazine, The New York Times Magazine, and Virginia Quarterly Review, each with six nominations.

Katie Couric will be hosting the awards gala, which will take place on May 9 in New York City. At least we know one thing she will be doing for sure in the future.

The New Yorker Leads in 2011 National Magazine Awards Nominations

Sid Holt, Chief Executive of the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME), announced the finalists for the 2011 National Magazine Awards this morning.

Some highlights:

  • The New Yorker leads with nine total nominations. Here are the other magazines receiving multiple nominations:

The Atlantic (4 nominations), Esquire (3), GQ (5), Harper’s Magazine (2), Los Angeles (3), Martha Stewart Living (2), Men’s Journal (2), National Geographic (4), New York (6), The New York Times Magazine (6), The Paris Review (2), Real Simple (3), Scientific American (2), Texas Monthly (2), TIME (2), Vanity Fair (2), Virginia Quarterly Review (6), W (3) and Wired (3). The six never-before-nominated titles are Cooking Light, House Beautiful, Lapham’s Quarterly, OnEarth, The Sun and Women’s Health.

  • The 2011 finalists include Michael Hastings’ ‘The Runaway General,’ which led to the resignation of Stanley McChrystal, and Jane Mayer’s ‘Covert Operations,’ on the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch.
  • The Awards will include the presentation of the Creative Excellence Award to Tom Wolfe.
  • Bonus: intriguingly, ASME puts women’s magazines (e.g., Women’s Health, Essence) in the “Fashion, Service and Lifestyle Magazines” category, but puts men’s magazines (e.g., GQ) in the “Finance, Technology and Lifestyle Magazines” category.

ASME Announces Changes To 2011 National Magazine Awards

The American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME) announced today that it will be instituting a few changes in the 2011 National Magazine Awards, or “Ellies.”

ASME has decided to hold the next National Magazine Awards ceremony as a dinner at 583 Park Avenue in New York City on May 9, 2011. Meanwhile the National Magazine Awards for Digital Media will continue to be presented at a luncheon ceremony in conjunction with the MPA Digital conference on March 16, 2011 at the Hilton New York.

ASME chief executive Sid Holt explains the change:

We feel turning the print awards into a dinner will enhance the sense of celebration and community for the entire magazine industry. Not only will a sit-down dinner be more fun, but it will give editors and publishers a chance to invite their magazine’s friends and clients.

ASME has also tweaked several of its awards categories, including those for General Excellence. Beginning with the 2011 National Magazine Awards, the General Excellence categories will be based on content, audience, frequency and circulation, a departure from preceding years’ awards presented in six categories based on circulation size. Thus, the new General Excellence, Print, categories are as follows:

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ASME CEO Sid Holt Talks Tonight’s Ellie Awards on the Menu

mmm_2-3.gifToday on the mediabistro.com Morning Media Menu we’re joined by Sid Holt, CEO of the American Society of Magazine Editors (ASME).

Holt’s ASME is the group behind tonight’s Ellies Awards. We talk about some of the themes of tonight’s show and nominees, the mood in this tough economic time and more. “It’s a celebration of what makes magazines unique and powerful,” said Holt of tonight’s event.

Also discussed: declining profits at two of the big magazine publishers, embracing the news crawl during ad breaks and, of course, Portfolio folding. “The numbers are terrible,” says Holt, while looking at the Time Inc. and Meredith Corp. first quarter numbers. But: “Would you rather be running Time Inc., or would you rather be running Citibank?”

You can listen to all the past podcasts at BlogTalkRadio.com/mediabistro and call in at 646-929-0321. One note: we’re live all this week an hour later than usual, at 10amET.

Lunch: Dishing With Dolly Parton

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— DIANE CLEHANE

Sure, it’s fun checking in with the media mavens and moguls during our weekly Wednesday outings at Michael’s, but sometimes it’s the random celebrity sighting that can be the most entertaining. When I heard that Dolly Parton was coming today, I was really looking forward to chatting with her. I first sat down with her and Jane Fonda way back when there was some big anniversary for her breakthrough film, 9 to 5. Of all the celebrities I’ve interviewed over the years, Dolly was by far one of the least pretentious. The hair, the outrageous outfits, the nails — the boobs — it’s all part of a perfectly calibrated persona that is as compelling today as it was back then.

When she arrived in the dining room, every head turned. Trust me, she’s like no one you’ve ever seen. At 63, she looked like a living doll with her expertly made-up ageless face, Barbie doll suit (paired with sheer black leggings), that famous platinum mane, and shoes that no other human being could possibly walk in. When I stopped her to chat, she gave me a big smile and grabbed my hand. “Of course I remember you!” she drawled when I explained when we last spoke. I almost believed her — she’s that genuine. When I asked her how things were going with 9 to 5 set to debut on Broadway next week (she wrote 40 songs for the show; 16 made it into the production), she said, “We’re working like crazy just tweaking little things until we get it right. We’re working ’til midnight. I’m really enjoying myself!” Then she sailed in to meet her producer Bob Greenblatt (Showtime’s president), Matt Blank and the rest of her table.

I was dining today with my good pal Kathryn Leigh Scott, who is one of the most prolific women I know. She’s written so many books I’ve lost count (and is currently working on two — one fiction and one nonfiction). But her really big news involves the article she’s penned on “the star and the stalker” for Opera News, due out in August. Kathryn has left no stone unturned in the account of the downside of divadom, which chronicles the complicated and chilling relationship between legendary opera star Birgit Nilsson and her stalker, model Nell Theobald. Kathryn uncovers some startling details in her report, which has attracted the attention of some Hollywood bigwigs: “There’s some interest in the dramatic rights,” Kathryn tells me. Like they say in Tinseltown, stay tuned…

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. Dolly Parton, Showtime’s Matt Blank and Bob Greenblatt and Lee Resnick. There was also an imposing looking fellow at the table who, from the looks of things, keeps things running smoothly for Dolly. I’m guessing you wouldn’t want to mess with him…

2. The first lady of New York, Michelle Paterson, and Jackie Rogers. For the moment, at least, it seems as if her husband’s dismal poll numbers weren’t top of mind: We spotted Michelle yukking it up as she enjoyed some white wine with her friend.

3. Dan Abrams and CNBC’s Brian Steel (Glad to hear you’re a ‘Lunch’ loyalist!)

4. Expectant father Les Moonves (congrats!) and Viacom’s Philippe Dauman. When Michael McCarty offered the television titan a hearty greeting of “Dad!” Les looked a little sheepish and uttered, “I’m an old man.” What’s that old saying about kids keeping you young? Please extend our congratulations to the missus, Julie Chen.

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US Weekly Draws ASME Fire for Faux Cover

78909-uscovmed.jpgTurns out that even though times are as desperate as they are in the magazine world, you still can’t do whatever you want to make money. ASME has just slapped US Weekly on the wrist for violating the very rules they have set up, which are “designed to protect magazines’ editorial integrity.”

The violation in question is the faux Grey Gardens cover the weekly mag ran on its April 20 edition. The mock cover was part of a five page spread for HBO’s upcoming production starring Drew Barrymore and Jessica Lange (read Gail Sheehy‘s original, and amazing, New York piece here, by the way).

Says Vicci Lasdon Rose, publisher of Us Weekly: “We were very clear by the creative treatment…so there was no miscommunication there. There was no effort to betray or manipulate the reader.”

Says ASME CEO Sid Holt: “ASME firmly believes that advertising cannot obscure the cover in any manner whatsoever, especially advertising that mimics editorial.”

Lunch: A Heaping Helping of The Usual Suspects

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— DIANE CLEHANE

It’s a lo-cal edition of ‘Lunch’ today. After all, you can’t expect to indulge in a diet rich in celebs and boldface names every week. We’ve spoiled you, I know. (By the way, if you’re looking to chat with some big-time media mavens and news makers, don’t miss the first TVNewser Summit on March 10.) After settling in at the bar, I went searching for tasty tidbits and found some of the regulars ready to serve up some interesting morsels. Men’s Health honcho David Zinczenko, who was praised in Keith Kelly‘s column in today’s New York Post as “a winner” and “the face” of Rodale, returned to the dining room after a long absence. “I’ve been having a lot more lunches at my desk,” Dave told me. Fresh off a round of appearances for his latest Eat This, Not That blockbuster book, Dave was lunching with Michael Caruso, the former editor-in-chief of Men’s Journal now with OpenGate Capital, the equity fund that recently bought TV Guide. No one multitasks like Dave, who was thrilled to show me the April issues of Men’s Health and its increasingly successful sister, Women’s Health, which boasts its first-ever beauty ‘flip cover.’ Dave is thrilled with new-ish hire Michele Promaulayko as editor for Women’s Health and was singing her praises with what she’d done with her first issue. “She’s already a star,” says Dave.

As luck would have it, Michele was right across the room lunching with The Food Network’s Giada De Laurentiis so I went over and introduced myself. Michele told me she was “thrilled” to be with the title, and we chatted about the always interesting experience of interviewing and shooting celebs and dished over what makes for a great fashion story. I told her I loved the piece on dressing for work. It looked terrific and oh-so-chic. We both agreed service has its place, but the pictures have to dazzle. And in her premiere issue, they do. “Fashion cred is important,” Michele told me. You’ve got it.

At the bar, there was plenty of conversation among Michael McCarty and his staff about the design for the new label for the upcoming release of his 2005 Pinot Noir from The Malibu Vineyard Rambla Pacifico. It’s his first since replanting in 2000 (in case you were wondering). We cast our vote to stay with the classic but modern look of the 2004 label. Sommelier Seth Liebman tells me the talk also turned to wine yesterday when Jack Kliger, an avid collector, wanted to enjoy a glass of 1970 Les Forts de Latour and didn’t want the rest of the bottle of the impressive vintage to go to waste, so he graciously offered some to director Stephen Daldry. Cheers!

Here’s the rundown on today’s crowd:

1. Steve Rubenstein presiding over a table of movers and shakers including Marty Bandier

2. Peter Brown with another distinguished gent (Update: That distinguished gent was New York Daily News editor-in-chief and deputy publisher Martin Dunn)

3. ‘Mayor’ Joe Armstrong and Lisa Caputo

4. David Zinczenko and Michael Caruso

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