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Posts Tagged ‘Slate’

Slate Editor: Please God, Let James Franco Just Be a Creep

As we head into the weekend on the wings of James Franco‘s Live with Kelly and Michael Mea Culpa, FishbowlNY wanted to highlight a favorite bit of media reaction to all this. In case you missed.

Picking up on the suggestion by colleagues that the actor’s Instagram contretemps has some very convenient resonance with Franco’s upcoming theatrical release Palo Alto, Slate assistant editor Katy Waldman posits the equivalent of Dear God… no:

If Franco’s Instagram flirtation is performance, it is deeply, deeply tired. Can celebrities ever really achieve authenticity? Is all the world a stage? What is the value/cost of testing the edges of romantic convention, in a knowing way, for art? What is art? Who am I? God, JF, you were so much more tolerable as the poufy-lipped nothingvillain in Spider-Man.

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Anti-Colbert Hashtag Activist Has a New Target: HuffPost Live

Slate political reporter David Weigel provides a good rundown of the #CancelColbert brouhaha spearheaded by 23-year-old freelance writer Suey Park. Some material on Wednesday’s edition, followed by an insensitive tweet from the Comedy Central official stream, led Park to a very effective viral protest.

Now, there’s more trouble brewing. Brought on to HuffPost Live today to discuss all this with Josh Zepps, Park is tweeting up a new storm:

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SueyParkTweet2

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Sweeney’s Successor | Weiner to Pen Column at BI | Bartiromo Given FNC Show

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Disney Names Ben Sherwood as Anne Sweeney’s Successor (THR)
ABC News president Ben Sherwood has been named Anne Sweeney’s successor as co-chairman of Disney Media Networks and president of Disney/ABC Television Group. He’ll officially take over the role on Feb. 1, 2015. TVNewser Sherwood will begin the transition immediately and take on the role of co-president of Disney/ABC while also overseeing ABC News until his successor is named. Variety Sherwood was a front-runner for the job ever since Sweeney shocked industry on March 11 when she announced she was resigning as of January 2015 to pursue a career as a television director. Sherwood steered the rise of Good Morning America and brokered deals like ABC News’ partnership with Yahoo!. He will also serve as co-chairman of Disney Media Networks alongside ESPN’s John Skipper. NYT Among Sherwood’s first decisions — with oversight from Disney chairman Bob Iger and Sweeney — will be the choice of his own successor in the news division. “We have a deep bench of leaders at ABC News,” he said. The standout candidate for that job is James Goldston, the senior vice president of ABC News who has been instrumental first in the revival of the late-night program Nightline and then in the rise of GMAWSJ Sherwood was named president of ABC News in December 2010. He is responsible for all aspects of ABC News’ broadcasts. In addition, Sherwood oversees ABC News Radio, ABCnews.com, satellite service NewsOne and ABC News Now. ABC News reaches a combined audience of well over 270 million people a month on television, on radio and online, and is enjoying significant audience growth driven by a creative renaissance and innovative deal-making. In addition, during Sherwood’s tenure, the news division has won the most prestigious honors in the industry.

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Slate Introduces Paid Membership Plan

There’s paywalls and metered paywalls, and then there’s Slate Plus, the new membership plan from Slate. The New York Times reports that Slate readers can subscribe to the plan — which will give them special access to the site’s writers, ad-free podcasts, and admission to live events — for $5 a month or $50 a year.

Slate Plus is unique in that the entire website will remain free. It’s a smart idea because Slate is keeping casual readers’ attention, but tempting their most dedicated fans with a paid product.

David Plotz, Slate’s editor-in-chief, said Slate Plus was a natural move for the site. “Advertising remains central to our success, but we think we’d be better off if we were less dependent on it,” he told the Times. “We also think it’s important to give readers a stake in the journalism they value, which is why we’re asking them to pay for membership.”

Slate Plus launches tomorrow.

Winner of Second Place Behind Slate/Travoltified: The LA Times

Bravo, LA Times editors. Bravo!

In today’s print editions, for a Calendar section article by David Ng and Oliver Gettell about the endlessly fascinating John Travolta/Adele Dazeem flub, the paper went with the following headline:

LATTravoltaAdeleDazeemHed

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The Esquire Cover That Changed Everything

The wonderful design podcast “99% Invisible” regularly gets its cross-posting due at Slate. The publication embeds each weekly episode together with a summary of the latest discussion.

EsquireBoxingCover

Episode #101 was a humdinger. Producer Avery Trufelman welcomed design legend George Lois, Esquire design director David Curcurito and former Rolling Stone art director Andy Cowles. At one point, the program revisited the early 1960s juncture during which Lois engineered a lightning-fast transition from the days when the magazine would feature on its cover mascot Esky, a mustachioed ladies man:

In 1962, Harold Hayes, the newly hired head editor of Esquire, asked [ad man] Lois to do a cover for him. As Lois tells it, Hayes was desperate and needed a cover in three days.

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Inc. Media Welcomes New Editor, Publisher

Inc. Media is into its fourth decade now. The company was founded in 1979 and acquired in 2005 by Mansueto Ventures, Inc. In addition to the monthly magazine, it currently counts an average of more than six million monthly unique visitors via Inc.com and The Build Network.

Portrait of Reuters staffer XXX, in New YorkToday is another sterling day for the brand. The company has announced James Ledbetter (pictured) as its new editor and John Donnelly as publisher. As part of these changes, Eric Schurenberg has moved over to the twin posts of president and editor-in-chief. From the announcement:

Most recently, Ledbetter spent more than three years at Thomson Reuters as its op-ed editor, working with notable names such as Lawrence Summers, Mohamed el-Erian, Steven Brill, Jack Shafer and Bethany McLean. He founded and ran Slate’s financial news site, The Big Money, from 2008 until 2010.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: CNN Lays Off 40 | Yglesias Departs Slate | Businessweek Cuts Back?

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CNN Lays Off More Than 40 Journalists (The Financial Times)
CNN has laid off more than 40 senior journalists in its newsgathering operation — including a pregnant producer who was two weeks away from giving birth to twins — as part of a reorganization of the business under Jeff Zucker. The lay-offs at CNN and HLN, its sister network, were concentrated in Washington, Atlanta and Los Angeles at the end of 2013. Poynter / MediaWire The cuts “coincide with changes to the network’s programming,” Matthew Garrahan reports in the Financial Times. Zucker “has hired new presenters and diversified CNN’s output, adding documentary and reality series to its traditional live news coverage.” TVNewser At the time of the layoffs — which number in the dozens — a source told TVNewser there would be no reduction in headcount in the cities most affected. Our source says changes in Los Angeles are related to a planned expansion of the entertainment unit. In recent weeks CNN has churned out entertainment-focused specials, including an hour on Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, and has increased awards season red carpet specials. The Guardian / Greenslade Blog CNN recently hit a 20-year low in prime time ratings in the U.S., attracting an average of just 78,000 viewers across the whole day and 98,000 in prime time. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Zucker recently announced plans to dedicate more of CNN’s air time to documentaries and unscripted reality series like Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown.

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As the Year Closes, Slate Writer Reminds: Whoa! is Spelled Whoa!

We tend to use the expression “Whoa!” sparingly, and not usually for matters pertaining to FishbowlNY. While we’ve never had trouble spelling the exclamation, apparently a lot of people in 2013 have.

SlateWhoaIn his final calendar-year “The Good Word” column, Matthew J.X. Malady catalogs all kinds of social media, headline and article misspellings of this W-word. He finds it rather amazing that he has to remind everyone that the “H” is silent, yes, but repeating, no:

If you were thinking you could perhaps quarantine yourself so as to preclude exposure to the TODAY Show–style “woah” [tweets] by avoiding all forms of social media and, say, spending some time relaxing in front of the TV, think again. This month, the History Channel began airing an episode of its popular series Pawn Stars under the title, “Woah Pilgrim”…

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Hawaii Scientist Hijacks Seventeen Magazine Hashtag

HopeJahrenThanks to a brainiac Hope Jahren (pictured), Seventeen magazine’s #ManicureMonday Twitter archives will never be the same.

Per a summary on Slate by Jason Bittel, it is Jahren – an isotope geochemist and laboratory scientist at the University of Hawaii Manoa – who came up with the hilarious idea of hijacking the publication’s latest round of regular Monday hashtagging. Instead of perfectly manicured cuticles, she got all sorts of scientific community folks to join in with pictures of more workman-like human digits:

When her academic colleagues asked her why she wastes her time tweeting, Jahren responds by saying it’s better than wasting her time writing publications nobody will ever read. If you haven’t noticed yet, Jahren’s got some major cut to her jib.

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