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Posts Tagged ‘Sree Sreenivasan’

Miller-McCune Is Holding Its First NYC Event This Thursday

Here’s an interesting event for media watchers we thought you all might like to know about: Miller-McCune magazine is hosting its first New York City event tomorrow morning: a live debate on “Keeping It Real — Offline Values in an Online World.” The talk will take place at 8:30 a.m. (with breakfast at 8:00) at Club 101, 101 Park Avenue and will be moderated by Miller-McCune‘s editor in chief John Mecklin. Panelists include Sree Sreenivasan, Columbia University; Dalton Conley, New York University and Elsewhere, U.S.A.; Rachel Sklar, Mediaite; and Eric Klinenberg, New York University and Public Culture.

Registration is required, so be sure to send an email today to julia@rosengrouppr.com.

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The Future Of Multiplatform Journalism: Giving Readers What They Want

reuters panel.pngAfter wrapping up two days of the Personal Democracy Forum yesterday, we ran over to a panel hosted by Reuters and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers discussing the future of journalism in a multimedia world.

Moderated by Reuters’ global managing editor Betty Wong, the panel included New York Times business and financial editor Lawrence Ingrassia, a very pregnant Financial Times U.S. managing editor Chrystia Freeland, Columbia Journalism School dean Sree Sreenivasan and mediabistro.com founder Laurel Touby.

Wong opened up the conversation by asking the panelists how media companies can make the best of all their resources, in order to take advantage of the many different platforms available.

“We all have to ask ourselves, ‘What do our readers really want?’” Freeland said. She added that journalists are entrepreneurial at heart and want to create a brand and a Web presence for themselves, but it’s up to the editors and management to decide what’s best for the news organization. “The turning point came when journalists realized that it is in their personal interest to have a Web presence,” she said. “Journalists became journalists to become famous and make a name for themselves.”

Photo: Thomson Reuters Markets CEO Devin Wenig (right) introduces the panel featuring (from left) Touby, Sreenivasan, Freeland and Ingrassia

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New York Press Club Media Job Market Panel Featuring Laurel Touby

jobs-trouby-laurel.jpg“Is journalism as we know it a dead-end career? Will the rise of “citizen journalism” and the Web mean we’ll soon get our news from journalists with day jobs in some other industry?” Next week the New York Press Club is hosting a panel, featuring our own Laurel Touby, among others, to discuss just that!

Other panelists include Leah Moses, Justin Peters, Win Sheffield, and Sree Sreenivasan all of whom will be talking about the outlook for jobs and opportunities in media. And there are some! Go look at our job board. For all the details about the event go here.

Times‘ ‘Style’ Section Says Asians Struggle To Attain Pop Stardom; South Asians, Norah Jones May Beg To Differ

norah_jones_saja.jpgIt’s tough being an aspiring Asian-American pop star. Or so says the Times‘ “Style” section:

There are Asian-American stars in sports, movies, television and classical music. But the “Asian thing” is what Mr. Lee and many other aspiring Asian-American singers say largely accounts for the lack of Asian-American pop stars. People in the music industry, including some executives, have no ready explanation, but Asian-American artists and scholars argue that the racial stereotypes that hobble them as a group — the image of the studious geek, the perception that someone who looks Asian must be a foreigner — clash with the coolness and born-in-the-U.S.A. authenticity required for American pop stardom.

Enter Sree Sreenivasan, who writes on the South Asian Journalists Association forum that the piece neglects to mention a little South Asian-American named, oh, Norah Jones:

No mention of South Asians in the piece — struggling or otherwise. This despite the fact that the current #1 album (since Feb. 17) in the country is by a South Asian American named Norah Jones (see her Billboard history, including three #1 albums) and one of the most visible and successful contestants on “American Idol” is 17-year-old Sanjaya Malakar (who has done at better than the East Asian “Idol” contestant featured in the article, Paul Lee).

This is the second time in less than three months that the Times has let Sree down. A January education story failed to mention South Asians, too.

  • Trying to Crack the Hot 100 [NYT]
  • MEDIA WATCH: NYT “Styles” section needs a diversity — and geography — lesson [SAJA Forum]
  • WNBC Discovers Blogs

    A funny thing happened at 30 Rock last night.

    The Conan O’Brien studio audience seats were filled with about 130 bloggers as local news anchors, correspondents, the news director and other NBC brass stood on the show’s set and soaked up the bloggers’ wisdom and perspective, acknowledged ignorance about the most basic of Web concepts, and encouraged — no, entreated — the bloggers to send every little tip and scooplet and news break they had.

    NBC feted the bloggers — everyone from former city parks commissioner Henry Stern and Wall Street Journal “Opinion” editor James Taranto to Red Gallery‘s Brian Van Nieuwenhoven and Sean Risley of My Body Story (who said he makes a living from his body art blog by getting speaking gigs and other assignments) — to a gnoshfest of pastries, sandwiches, cheese, nuts and soda (no liquor — FCC rules, they said), and seemed, in our estimation, surprisingly open to this whole Web 2.0 thing, while acknowledging that while they were the first in New York to reach out to bloggers like this, other cities such as Nashville and San Francisco have already done the same.

    There was more than a whiff of skepticism. A lot of the bloggers scoffed at local TV news’ penchant for “if it bleeds it leads” stories about fires and muggings and robberies.

    “How many people here have WNBC on your lists” when sending emails about scoops asked Sree Sreenivasan, newly minted tech guru for NBC’s local news shows after jumping from ABC. No one raised a hand. News director Dan Forman asked how many in the room wanted TV local news to go completely off the tube and for the company to spend all those millions putting it on the Web. About half the audience raised their hands. It would have been more, but a significant portion of the attendees were NBC people. Forman also acknowledged complete ignorance of what blogging software is, even as Six Apart founder Anil Dash sort of tried to explain.

    Continued below: “MSM doesn’t mean metrosexual male.” Pictures, names, blog links and more quotes.

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