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Posts Tagged ‘Star’

Janice Min Set To Depart Us Weekly

us_weekly_min2.jpgJanice Min, longtime editor of celeb magazine Us Weekly said yesterday that she will be leaving her post when her $2.5 million contract expires at the beginning of next month.

Min told The New York Times she didn’t know what she would do next, “But I’m 39 and I’d like to have another career. I felt like I’d done every possible thing at Us Weekly to make it successful.”

In a letter to her staffers, obtained by Mediaite.com, Min said she had “decided it was time to try something else in my life, do a little Gosselin detox and occasionally go out on Monday nights.”

Executive editor Michael Steele will be taking over Min’s spot, the magazine’s owner Jann Wenner told the Times.

Former Us editor Bonnie Fuller hired Min as her number two in 2002, and Min took over the magazine’s top editor slot when Fuller left for Star a year later. Last week, Fuller was named editor-in-chief at celebrity Web site HollywoodLife, becoming the latest big name journalist snapped up by the site’s owner Jay Penske for his growing media empire. Might Min be eyeing a spot on Penske’s team? Or, conversely, does Penske have a place for the successful editor? It’s certainly possible, but no matter where she goes next, all eyes will be on her.

Bonnie Fuller Returns To Editor-In-Chief Spot at Celeb Web Site

bonnie.pngShe once helped celebrity magazine Us Weekly become a must-read and guided American Media, which publishes Star. Then Bonnie Fuller left the world of magazines last year to launch her own company, Bonnie Fuller Media. But now she’s put those plans on hold, returning to a role as editor-in-chief — of a Web site.

Yesterday, David Carr of The New York Times reported that Fuller had been named editor and president of HollywoodLife, a celebrity site based in Los Angeles owned by Mail.com Media Corporation.

Mail.com made a splash last month when it purchased Hollywood reporter Nikki Finke‘s Web site DeadlineHollywoodDaily.com. Carr also has a profile of Finke on today’s front page of the Times, in which he reveals that she “stands to make more than $5 million in the next eight years,” from the sale of her blog. “And her deal could go as high as $10 million,” Carr added, citing an anonymous source with knowledge of the matter.

So is Mail.com, which also owns Movieline.com and OnCars.com, finished snapping up big name media personalities, or are there more to come? And what exactly does Mail.com owner Jay Penske plan for the future of his media empire? Guess we’ll have to wait and see.

(Photo from Fuller’s Twitter page)

Mediaite Launches To Server-Crashing Traffic

mediaite.pngThe hotly anticipated Mediaite.com, the media blog brainchild of consulting company Abrams Research, launched early this morning. The site, which has sections for TV, online and print media news and criticism in addition to columns from media heavy weights like former Us Weekly and Star editor-in-chief Bonnie Fuller and ex-Portfolio deputy editor Jim Impoco, was quickly inundated with readers furiously clicking — consequently giving visitors some viewing problems. (We couldn’t load the site while we were writing this post, although we got a glimpse earlier in the day.)

“We were getting an overload in simultaneous users trying to access the site,” explained Senior Editor Glynnis MacNicol, noting that problems started happening around 9 a.m. around the time people started getting to work. “While we were prepared for heavy traffic and had a back up CDN, we still managed to overload. Things are running right now, but slow for certain people. I think it also had to do with the type of traffic [we were getting]. People were flying around the site, spending [more time] and clicking on more pages.” They are working to correct the problems right now, MacNicol added.

Once visitors can access the site problem-free, the biggest draw to Mediaite will undoubtedly be its rankings of media pros. The ranks are broken down into categories: television anchors/hosts, TV reporters, media moguls, “TV Titans,” magazine editors, TV pundits, newspaper/online editors, radio hosts, TV execs, print/online reporters, print/online editors and “Magazine Titans.” Members of each group are ranked based on various factors such as ratings of their shows or circulation of their magazines, number of Twitter followers and the amount of “Buzz” on blogs or in print.

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Two Magazines Lose Top Talent After Short Tenures

o.pngThis week, we learned of two top magazine staffers, one publisher and one editor-in-chief, leaving their posts after just a few months on the job.

First came word that Susan Reed is leaving her spot as editor-in-chief at O, The Oprah Magazine after less than a year at the helm of the Hearst pub. Before joining O, Reed served as the editor-in-chief at Golf for Women for more than six years. She will be replaced by Time Inc.‘s Susan Casey.

Also this week, the New York Post reported that Francis Farrell will be leaving the publisher slot at Men’s Journal after less than six months. Farrell formerly worked as publisher National Geographic Traveler and joined the men’s magazine in October 2008. Farrell will be replaced by Matt Mastrangelo, the Post said.

The Post also reported that American Media, which publishes Star and National Enquirer has lost its CFO Dean Durbin after only a year and a half — not quite as short a stint as the others but a quick turnaround nonetheless.

People Disappears from Wal-Mart in Distribution Stand-Off

people-magazine.jpgOne has to wonder at the logic of a magazine distribution standoff in the midst of a financial crisis that’s threatening to sink the industry. Nonetheless (as threatened) Time Inc., American Media, and Bauer have pulled their magazines from Wal-Mart, the single biggest magazine retailer in the country, over a dispute with wholesalers Anderson News and Source Interlink Cos, who (as threatened) have imposed a seven cent surcharge on every copy delivered.

This means until the dispute is settled Wal-Mart will be without copies of People, Sports Illustrated, Time, In Touch, Life & Style, Star, and National Enquirer. Time Inc. says they have pulled together their own network of wholesalers, which is great but doesn’t solve the problem of Wal-Mart who says it is standing behind Source Interlink and Anderson.

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Your Post-Radar Magazine Choices

Radar-gggpolitics-cover.jpgAccording to The Media is Dying those of you who were subscribers to the sadly now defunct Radar magazine can now have your choice of…wait for it…Star, Men’s Fitness, or Shape.

You know there was a time not that long ago where this post would have linked you to The Onion.

Today’s Roundup: Layoffs Hit NPR, AMI Near Bankruptcy

0623-npr-cvr.jpgLooks like the layoff wave has rolled into NPR. Despite reaching “near-record audience levels on-air and online,” NPR has announced that due to the current economy and a shortfall in corporate underwriting they are laying off 7% of their workforce and cutting expenses: “A total of 64 filled positions have been eliminated against NPR’s current staff of 889, 21 open positions will not be filled and travel and discretionary expenses have been cut across the organization. The press release (in full after the jump) says that a significant number of the cuts will come from the cancellation of NPR produced programs — Day to Day and News & Notes. UPDATE: FBDC has the staff memo.

Meanwhile AMI, the company that publishes Star magazine and the National Enquirer is on the verge of filing for bankruptcy. The NYP is reporting that the company missed a Dec. 1 final deadline to make a $21.2 million interest payment and is “feverishly negotiating with bondholders of $1.1 billion of its debt.”

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Jamie Lynn Spears Loses Fan Base

knockedupnecklace.jpg

When is Nickelodeon going to boot Jamie Lynn Spears?

When even the slack-jawed yokels who read the Star are calling for her dismissal and public shaming, things have gotten out of hand.

On the other hand, maybe Spears thought Knocked Up was a documentary.

The Toll “Real News” Takes

feverchart.jpgThe folks at Us Weekly, OK!, Star and E! must be taking some long lunch breaks this week. Whenever “real” news strikes (read: tragedy that happens in the U.S. — that Iraq stuff is so played out), the appetite for celebrity dish tends to go way, way down. How far down?

Thirty-three percent down.

According to our unscientific study tracking the number of posts on TMZ.com, we discovered that tragedy accounts for a 32.9 percent decrease in posts this week over the same time period the week before.

But for those who worry that this new sobriety will last, that our way of life will forever be altered, take comfort. All is not lost — just 33 percent of it is.

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