TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Steve Brill’

Morning Media Newsfeed: Ben Bradlee Dies at 93 | Pew Finds Partisan News Consumption

Click here to receive Mediabistro’s Morning Media Newsfeed via email.

Former Washington Post Editor Ben Bradlee Dies at 93 (FishbowlDC)
Former editor of The Washington Post Ben Bradlee died Tuesday of natural causes at the age of 93 at his home in Washington. Bradley served as executive editor of The Washington Post from 1968-1991, a time that included the resignation of President Richard Nixon and the Watergate scandal. The Washington Post Bradlee’s most important decision, made with publisher Katharine Graham, the Post’s publisher, may have been to print stories based on the Pentagon Papers, a secret Pentagon history of the Vietnam War. The Post’s circulation nearly doubled while Bradlee was in charge of the newsroom — first as managing editor and then as executive editor — as did the size of its newsroom staff. NYT With full backing from Graham, Bradlee led the Post into the first rank of American newspapers, courting controversy and giving it standing as a thorn in the side of Washington officials. When government officials called to complain, Bradlee acted as a buffer between them and his staff. “Just get it right,” he would tell his reporters. Most of the time they did, but there were mistakes, one so big that the paper had to return a Pulitzer Prize. Boston Globe It was Bradlee who guided the Post through its coverage of the Watergate scandal — “the story of our generation,” he later called it, “the story that put us all on the map” — and his unwavering leadership was crucial to the success of the paper’s investigations during the nine months between the break-in at Democratic National Committee headquarters on June 17, 1972, and the sentencing of the Watergate burglars on March 23, 1973, a period during which the Post was far out in front of the rest of the media in covering the scandal and, as a result, dangerously exposed to criticism from the Nixon administration. Reuters Bradlee’s death at his Washington home of natural causes was announced by the Post, which reported late last month that he had begun hospice care after suffering from Alzheimer’s disease for several years.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Personal Essay Writing

Personal Essay WritingStarting October 28, work with a published journalist to draft, edit, and sell your first-person essays! Jessica Olien will help you to workshop your writing so that it's ready to pitch to editors. You'll learn how to tell your personal story, self-edit you work to assess voice, style, and tone, and sell your essays for publication. Register now!

Jill Abramson Joining Steve Brill on Startup

Jill Abramson, the former New York Times executive editor who was fired last May, has finally shed some light on what her future holds. During WBUR event “Fast Forward,” Abramson said she’s teaming up with Steve Brill on a startup that “will be doing one big story a year.” She also noted that she’s currently pitching the startup to investors, who “sound very interested.”

The pairing would actually be a homecoming of sorts. Brill — who founded American Lawyer in 1979 — made Abramson one of his first hires. Brill’s most recent brush with notoriety came when he penned the massive “Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us” cover story for Time.

Abramson already has a teaching job at Harvard lined up. She also had stated that she’d “like to be working at the highest quality kind of magazine,” and if she and Brill are doing only one story per year, perhaps she still wants to do that.

We imagine more details about the duo’s project will emerge soon. We’ll keep you posted, because we’re just as interested as you are.

Jon Steinberg on The MailOnline’s Plans for World Domination, New Hire Piers Morgan

LunchAtMichaelsIt was a true media mashup at Michael’s today as the joint was jam-packed with famous faces (Katie Couric and Barbara Walters at separate tables; Natalie Morales) and moguls (David Zinczenko), while the usual suspects upped the volume to near ear-splitting levels. I had to lean in to catch every word uttered by Jon Steinberg, who joined me for lunch to dish about his new-ish gig as CEO of the Daily Mail‘s MailOnline.com, yesterday’s announcement that Piers Morgan was joining the site and his old guard inspirations in this new-media world.

Diane Clehane and Jon Steinberg

Diane Clehane and Jon Steinberg

I suggested Jon and I do “Lunch” after I interviewed him earlier this year for a Gotham cover story I was doing on New York City’s most powerful millennials, for which he talked about his role in creating  BuzzFeed as its president and chief operating officer. During Steinberg’s tenure, BuzzFeed became a global brand and went from a staff of 15 to more than 500. Turns out our chat was fortuitously timed. Days before the story was set to go to press in May, Jon announced that after four years at the helm of the social news and entertainment site, he was stepping down to pursue his next big adventure. “Having built this place with Jonah [Peretti, BuzzFeed’s founder and CEO] and the rest of the team, I want to go through that rush again, and there is a certain amount of freedom that I want,” he said at the time. Since when we spoke for the Gotham piece, he’d told me he believed “freedom and independence are the new status symbols,” I was eager to see what his next move would be. A short time later, he announced he was joining MailOnline as chief executive officer of North America. Today he arrived fresh off the set of CNBC, where he appears three times a week as a contributor on Squawk on the Street. Said Jon of his television gig: “I love it because they operate it like a startup. They had the idea for it and just weeks later, it was on the air. It’s a great team.” But clearly, he’s even more enthusiastic about his top spot at MailOnline. “I wasn’t the CEO before and that’s something I’ve always wanted. I get to make a lot more decisions now,” he told me today, between bites of chicken paillard. And he’s making plenty.

Read more

Manhattan’s A-List Turns Out for Harvey Weinstein’s Giants Pep Rally

1003_mockup.gif

I’ve been covering  Wednesday’s at Michael’s for five years and have never seen anything like the head-spinning scene that unfolded there today. Harvey Weinstein and Steve Tisch threw a pep rally to end all pep rallies, and the media A-list all came out to cheer on their favorite team. Peggy Siegal and her minions descended on the place before the crowd rushed in with plenty of New York Giants paraphernalia, transforming the California cool decor into an indoor tailgate party.

By noon, I counted at least a dozen paparazzi staked out at the entrance, and they certainly weren’t disappointed. Drew Nieporent was the first to arrive (“What’s for lunch?”), and in short order the lounge was flooded with famous folks, including Brian Williams, Gayle King, Piers Morgan, Kathie Lee Gifford and Hoda Kotb (wearing newly identical red dresses and looking fabulous), former governor George Pataki, Matt Lauer and various members of the Tisch family.

Katie Couric and Harvey Weinstein
Katie Couric and Harvey Weinstein

Everyone’s mind was on the big game; conventional wisdom says the Giants will be this year’s Super Bowl champs, but it’s going to be a close one.  (All except Jerry Della Femina, who predicts the Patriots will take it 27-24.) “I think it’s going to be a squeaker,” offered Andrew Ross Sorkin. “At least I hope so because it will be a better game.”

Not surprisingly, Giants legend Frank Gifford, who will be watching the game from his home in Greenwich with family and friends, predicts a 30-10 win for his former team. “Eli Manning has really come into his own as a quarterback,” he told me. “But a quarterback is only as good as his team. They’re a great team. If you were playing for the Giants, you’d be a great quarterback.” Doubtful, but we appreciate the sentiment. Brian Williams, who’ll be going to the game, refused to speculate on the final score for fear of tempting the gods. ”You just don’t do that,” he told me.

Diane Clehane and Brian Williams
Diane Clehane and Brian Williams (Credit: Dimitrios Kambouris)

Read more

Update: More Details on MediaNews And Press+

250px11-Medianewsgroup.jpg

Yesterday we reported on MediaNews‘ trial of Steve Brill‘s JournalismOnline pay wall platform Press+, which seeks a way for writers to maybe one day get paid for Internet reporting. Today, new details have emerged about the experiment, which will launch on two of MediaNews newspaper websites — York Daily Records and the Enterprise-Record — and which VP for content development Howard Saltz has already compared to The Financial Times pay model. So which content will we be coughing it up for in the future?

Read more

MediaNews Tries Press+ For Pay Walls

250px-Medianewsgroup.jpg

Is this the turning of the content tide? For months now we’ve been looking forward to seeing Steve Brill‘s model for regulating content with his new company JournalismOnline, which will be using a platform called Press+ to standardize pay walls for websites. We have yet to see JO work in practice, but other media companies are already jumping on the Press+ bandwagon, most recently the York Daily Record in Pennsylvania and the Enterprise-Record in California, which should be ready for the content provider come April or May, and be the first sites to test the new system. Both papers are owned by MediaNews Group, one of the largest newspaper holders in the country.

Read more

WSJ. Goes Online|The Observer Moves|Inside The Trump-Kushner Wedding|Another Sobering Poll About The Public’s View Of The Media|AboveTheLaw’s Lat Interviews Brill

WWD: The Wall Street Journal‘s glossy magazine WSJ. is planning to add two online issues to its quarterly print run.

The Observer: The New York Observer is moving offices. During the first half of next year, the pink paper is scheduled to move to a building that is already part of owner Jared Kushner‘s portfolio: 321 West 44th Street, between Eighth and Ninth avenues. The Observer‘s new home is a 10-story office building whose ground floor is leased by Birdland Jazz Club.

Brides.com: And speaking of Kushner, Brides.com has an inside look at his wedding to New York heiress Ivanka Trump, including sketches of the one-of-a-kind ring designed by Kushner.

Poynter: A Sacred Heart University poll reveals that a large majority of the American public think the media played a significant role in getting Barack Obama elected president and are intent on promoting his presidency.

Legal Rebels: AboveTheLaw.com founder David Lat interviews American Lawyer magazine and Court TV founder Steve Brill about how he came up for the idea for the magazine, the AmLaw 100 and the magazine’s business model. You can check out the first part of the three-part interview above, or see it all here.

Runner’s World Credits Web Site For Sub Increase|LA Weekly Writer Responds To Criticism|Ivanka To Wed Jared|Brill & Crovitz Discuss Journalism Online|Praise For Andrew Sullivan

WebNewser: Runner’s World‘s Web site drove an 89 percent increase magazine subscriptions during the first half of the year, compared to 2008. Overall, the magazine saw a 5 percent increase in subscriptions during the first six months of the year.

FishbowlLA: LA Weekly writer Daniel Heimpel responds to a blogger’s negative commentary of his medical marijuana article.

Daily Intel: New York Observer owner Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump are engaged and she sat down with New York magazine’s Daily Intel blog to discuss the relationship. They both sound like workaholics, but him even more than her. Says an enamored Trump: “Every night when he goes home, he works for about an hour and a half and return[s] e-mails he hadn’t had a chance to return before. He’s just very diligent…Even when we first started dating, I’d call him at 6 [a.m.] when I’m getting up, and he’d be awake; he’d definitely be awake when I was going to sleep. And all Sunday he’s in the office.” Mazel tov, you crazy kids.

AOL DailyFinance: Jeff Bercovici talks to Steve Brill and Gordon Crovitz about their Journalism Online project, which seeks to help newspapers and media companies charge money for their digital content.

The Week: High praise for Andrew Sullivan, blogger for The Atlantic‘s Daily Dish. “With the help of a couple of assistants, Sullivan produced a journalistic tour de force that was more comprehensive, informative, provocative, and addictively compelling than anything produced by news organizations with hundreds of professional journalists on staff and coteries of experts on speed dial,” says Francis Wilkinson. “His Iran coverage was the blogosphere’s moonshot, a feat of grit and daring heralding a new era in cyberspace. It was a preview of the future of journalism — and it worked. Or seemed to.”

Media Execs Take Paid Content Into Their Own Hands

pennies1.jpgA little less conversation a little more action! Perhaps that was part of the thinking behind Journalism Online, the new iTunes (ish) for media launch conceived by Steve Brill, Gordon Crovitz, and Leo Hindery.

The Times reports that the company “aims to supply publishers with ready-made tools to charge Internet fees…The company, which says it may have a product ready by the fall, says the advantages are that publishers would not have to develop their own systems and readers could use a single system for many different publications.”

The details are still being sorted, and no one has yet signed on, but the idea is that publishers will be able to choose how they want to make their content available, i.e. subscription, micro-payment, etc. And while the micropayment system has thus far been a great conversation topic, it’s not been lauded by media types as being all that practical. Still Journalism Online could provide a great testing ground for newspapers to explore what customers are willing to pay for (or not) when it comes to content.