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Posts Tagged ‘Steve Hindy’

Q&A Series Resumes 9/11 with Reporter Who Covered 9/11

Next week, the great local discussion series “War Correspondents at the Brooklyn Brewery,” which launched this spring in Williamsburg, will kick off its impressive fall line-up. New York Times correspondent C.J. Chivers, who covered the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks and has since reported from Afghanistan, Libya, Iraq and Syria, will be the Wednesday September 11 guest of honor.

Chivers will be interviewed by Brooklyn Brewery co-founder Steve Hindy, a one-time AP foreign correspondent. The work of award-winning combat zone photographer Fabio Bucciarelli will also be on display:

A former Marine who served in the 1991 Gulf War, Chivers’ expertise in weaponry and military affairs make him one of the most insightful reporters on conflict today.

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Bearing Witness to the Impact of Wartime Digital Photography

Among those in attendance Wednesday night for a book event at the Brooklyn Brewery, an establishment owned and operated by former AP war correspondent Steve Hindy, was Abraham Moussako. Today, via the Columbia Journalism Review, he offers a good summary of the conversation that took place about covering the Iraq War.

Joining Hindy was Pulitzer Prize-nominated photojournalist Michael Kamber and two Pulitzer winners featured in his new book Photojournalists on War: The Untold Stories from IraqTodd Heisler (New York Times, Rocky Mountain News) and Carolyn Cole (LA Times). Moussako lists the pertinent takeaways, including this truism likely taken for granted by many readers today:

Unlike wars in the past, when photographers were sometimes long gone from the front-line by the time the photos appeared in print, soldiers and their commanders were able to react to photos taken in the morning by that very afternoon. Oftentimes they would criticize the pictures. In some cases, they even used them to target insurgents.

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