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Posts Tagged ‘Steven Berlin Johnson’

Ken Paulson Joins Patch Board of Advisors

Ken Paulson, the founding editor of USA Today, has joined Patch’s Board of Advisors. Paulson currently serves as president and CEO of Vanderbilt University’s First Amendment Center. He was one of the journalists who founded USA Today in 1982.

“There is no greater advocate for the first amendment and journalism than Ken Paulson,” said Patch co-founder Warren Webster, in a statement. “He has been an innovator throughout his career and will bring a critical voice to the development of Patch as the leading local information platform. We welcome Ken and look forward to his insights as we continue to chart new territory.”

Paulson joins a board that already includes Philip Meyer, Steven Berlin Johnson, Jeff Jarvis, and Brian Farnham.

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How the Internet Will Save Local News

42-15111207.jpgVia the Times Opinionator blog Steven Berlin Johnson opines (during a speech at SXSW) on how the Internet actually allows for the sort of comprehensive, local reporting it it tough to find in large newspapers.

When people talk about the civic damage that a community suffers by losing its newspaper, one of the key things that people point to is the loss of local news coverage. But I suspect in ten years, when we look back at traditional local coverage, it will look much more like MacWorld circa 1987. I adore the City section of the New York Times, but every Sunday when I pick it up, there are only three or four stories in the whole section that I find interesting or relevant to my life — out of probably twenty stories total. And yet every week in my neighborhood there are easily twenty stories that I would be interested in reading…The New York Times can’t cover those things in a print paper not because of some journalistic failing on their part, but rather because the economics are all wrong…We’ve never thought of it as a failing of the newspaper that its metro section didn’t report on a deli closing, because it wasn’t even conceivable that a big centralized paper could cover an event with such a small radius of interest.

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