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Posts Tagged ‘Steven Soderbergh’

Nancy Allen Hosts Special RoboCop Screening

In the years since RoboCop first burst on to the scene in 1987, there have been just two screenings at which stars Peter Weller and Nancy Allen were reunited with director Paul Verhoeven. The first occurred last July on the UCLA campus for the film’s 25th anniversary; the second will take place Saturday May 18 at Harmony Gold to raise money for the Sherman Oaks non-profit Allen now oversees as executive director.

“Actually, the UCLA screening is what gave me the idea for the Harmony Gold event,” Allen tells FishbowlLA via telephone. “Everybody came out, we had such an amazing experience seeing the movie together so many years later and talking about it.”

“It was a small event but it got me thinking,” she adds. “I thought, ‘My God, I have so many fans, what if we did this for something good? What if we did this and it could help benefit weSPARK. I wrote to everybody and I got a resounding, ‘Yes!’”

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AFI Fest Has a Massive Weekend

FishbowlLA was all over AFI Fest this weekend. And we’re happy to report it was one of the best cinematic experiences we’ve ever had. Although it didn’t start off that way. Unlike the LA Film Festival, which had armies of volunteers guiding your every movement, AFI Fest can get a bit confusing. Friday was a zoo, with some sidewalks shut off for the red carpet and virtually no staff presence to help guide confused festival-goers to their destinations. But by Saturday we had it figured out–and we’re certainly glad we gave it a chance. If any of you had a similar experience, don’t be discouraged. It all makes sense after your third or fourth film.

The big news of the weekend was undoubtedly the surprise premiere of Steven Soderbergh‘s new film Haywire. We were unable to attend, as it was a friggin’ mad house. But we admired the clever way the film was rolled out. AFI Fest had been promising a “special screening” for weeks. But it wasn’t until Saturday night that the announcement came it would be Haywire.

Yesterday also saw the festival premiere of Werner Herzog‘s new film Into the Abyss–about the execution of Texas convicted murderer Michael Perry and the lives of those involved in his crime–which we were able to see. Herzog was in attendance at the Egyptian Theater and was sure to explain prior to the screening that his personal position was firmly anti-death penalty. His film, however, is far more complicated than an advocacy piece. Herzog speaks with a woman whose mother and brother were killed by Perry–over a car. When she tells Herzog that Perry’s death brought her the first true peace she’d had since the murders, it’s a difficult thing to argue with.

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UCLA Prof Earns Doctorate in Self-Defense

Things can get nasty in the highly competitive world of theoretical academics. But rarely do they escalate to the level of identity theft, defamation and criminal investigation as outlined in Tom Tugend‘s highly entertaining investigation in the Jewish Journal.

Under the Steven Soderbergh-like headline “Slander, Lies and the Dead Sea Scrolls”, the reporter details a three-year battle waged between UCLA adjunct professor Robert Cargill (pictured) and an unknown cyber-assailant hellbent on taking down his VR theories about the origins of the sacred Jewish document.

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Ira Glass Reveals The End Of “This American Life” TV Show

92y.JPGWhat started as a casual conversation about the humble beginnings of Chicago Public Radio‘s “This American Life” turned into an impromptu press conference last night as host Ira Glass announced the end of the popular radio program’s Emmy nominated television spinoff on Showtime.

“I don’t know if I can say this yet, but we’ve asked to be taken off of television,” Glass revealed.

Glass’ unexpected announcement came in the midst of a Behind the Scenes event hosted at Manhattan’s 92nd Street Y. The night’s panel, moderated by NY1‘s Budd Mishkin, included the show’s senior producers Julie Snyder, Nancy Updike, Jane Feltes and Sean Cole, as well as film rights producer Alissa Shipp and production manager Seth Lind.

Then, of course, there was Glass — the host and executive producer of the public radio golden child and Showtime program of the same name — who has become ubiquitous on television, billboards and panels alike. His Buddy Holly glasses and graying spiked hair are familiar by now, and his notoriety explains why his introductory applause was by far the most sustained.

Steering the conversation casually, Mishkin lauded the program, giving the night a celebratory feel as the show’s creators discussed its methods and told insider stories to the delight of the crowd. The event began with anecdotes from seemingly slapdash beginnings, as Updike recalled struggling to fill an hour broadcast, even letting Glass wing it live to fill time in the days before the show’s syndication.

The producers reflected on the various media properties that have resulted since the humble inception of “This American Life,” including the forthcoming Steven Soderbergh film The Informant! starring Matt Damon, which is based on an episode.

According to Glass, the show’s relationship with movies was all about supply and demand: “We had no money, but a large supply of ideas, while Hollywood had a large amount of money and no ideas.”

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