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Posts Tagged ‘Stuart Elliott’

Athlon Slashes Parade Magazine Rate Base, Ad Costs

It’s always fascinating to be afforded a precise look at the ad rates charged by major monthly and weekly print magazines.

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Case in point - Parade. Outgoing NYT advertising columnist Stuart Elliott got the advance tip about a series of new measures announced today by Athlon Media Group. These changes include the following adjustments:

Reducing the rate base — the circulation of Parade guaranteed to advertisers — to 22 million from 32 million through measures like concentrating distribution in larger, urban markets. Ad rates for Parade, costly for print media, are also being reduced; for instance, a common type of ad known as a one-time, four-color page will fall to $667,165 from $924,209.

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Stuart Elliott Answers Readers for the Last Time

StuartElliottQALogoAs one of the many New York Times staffers who chose to accept the paper’s buyout offer, advertising beat reporter Stuart Elliott has put together his final questions list and checked it twice:

Dear readers, because this is the final issue of In Advertising, I am trying to clear the decks and am publishing more questions than usual.

Befitting his last such column, Elliott leads off with a doozy. A reader asks about a sly reference to Smith Brothers cough drops in an old, short-lived Red Foxx New York-set TV series. The columnist’s reply:

According to The Complete Directory of Prime Time Network and Cable TV Shows 1946-Present, a reference book that is among the final ones remaining at my desk, the series was titled The Redd Foxx Show and it was broadcast by ABC for only three months in 1986, from January 18 to April 19.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Snyderman Apologizes on Air | Elliott Takes NYT Buyout

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Dr. Nancy Snyderman Apologizes: ‘Good People Can Make Mistakes’ (TVNewser)
Dr. Nancy Snyderman returned to NBC News Wednesday morning to report a story on depression in America. But the segment began with Matt Lauer pressing her on why she violated a voluntary quarantine following an Ebola reporting trip to Liberia. PRNewser Rather than just saying she was sorry for breaking the rules, she and Lauer got more specific about what exactly went wrong. Besides “scaring my community,” she says she was guilty of “adding to the confusion of terms.” THR Snyderman initially apologized for her team violating its voluntary quarantine, but now, almost two months later, she’s admitted that she, herself, broke the rules and apologized for that. “I’m very sorry for…scaring my community and the country,” she said on Wednesday’s Today, later adding, “I stepped outside the boundaries of what I promised to do and what was expected of me and for that I’m sorry.” HuffPost Snyderman had been absent from the network since October after traveling to Liberia with an NBC News crew — which included cameraman Ashoka Mukpo, a former Ebola patient — and then failing to voluntarily confine herself to a 21-day quarantine. Her actions caused outrage and heightening fear among the public after discovery that her colleague had contracted the virus. Snyderman issued a statement shortly after breaking quarantine in October, but questions lingered about the date of her return to the network (or whether she would return at all). Variety Snyderman’s colleague eventually recovered from the disease, and Snyderman and the rest of her team remained symptom-free. Wednesday, she added that she hopes her mistake hasn’t drawn attention from the bigger story.

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More NY Times Buyouts [Updated]

NYTimeslogoThe list of New York Times staffers taking buyouts continues to grow. The latest include media reporter Christine Haughney and special projects editor Lexi Mainland.

Both veterans announced their departures on Twitter. “After 8 years with @nytimes including nearly 3 years writing about my colleagues in the troubled newspaper industry, I am taking a buyout” wrote Haughney. “After 8.5 years, I’m moving on from @nytimes,” tweeted Mainland. “It’s been the thrill of a lifetime to play a part in the world’s best journalism.”

The full list of staffers taking a buyout is below. We’re updating each day, so if we missed any, please let us know.

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Celebrating the Work of a 100-Year-Old Illustrator

It should be a grand old time tomorrow night at the Museum of the City of New York. That’s because among those expected for the McCauley “Mac” Conner exhibit opening night party is the man himself, age 100.

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From the exhibit notes:

Conner grew up admiring Norman Rockwell magazine covers in his father’s general store. He arrived in New York as a young man to work on wartime Navy publications and stayed on to make a career in the city’s vibrant publishing industry.

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Meredith, Scripps Readying Boatload of New Web Series

Interesting piece by New York Times advertising writer and blogger Stuart Elliott. He takes a look at the 2013-14 sponsored Web series battle plans of two very familiar media companies – Meredith and Scripps Networks.

Among the shows coming down the pike are Baby Sleep 911, which will follow a baby sleep consultant into various parents’ homes; Bonkers Awesome!, showcasing food blogger Joy Wilson; and How We Broke the News, featuring couples explaining how they told relatives of their intention to marry.

On the Meredith side, a key hire in support of all this was made in the spring:

A cornerstone of Meredith Originals was the arrival in April of Laura Rowley as vice president for video production and product at the Meredith National Media Group, based in New York. She had been executive producer for original video and partnerships at The Huffington Post.

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Reaction to Expedia LGBT Commercial ‘Mixed’

New York Times advertising reporter Stuart Elliott has a solid and – on this landmark SCOTUS day – very timely look at the state of LGBT-targeted TV commercials.

Elliott leads with the above Expedia commercial, told from the point of view of a grandfatherly parent. The monologue piece was posted online last fall and expanded to the TV airwaves of Logo, CNN, MSNBC and several other channels in May:

“I have friends who are gay who said, ‘I sent this to my mother,’ ‘I sent this to my father,’” said Expedia director of PR and social media Sarah Gavin of the commercial, which was created by the Los Angeles office of 180, part of the Omnicom Group. “We wanted to start a conversation…”

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Corbis Acquires Leading Product Placement Agency

It can be tough sometimes for reporters to liven up a dry bit of business news such as the acquisition of LA’s Norm Marshall & Associates by the Bill Gates-owned Corbis. But tipped ahead of Monday’s press release, New York Times writer Stuart Elliott managed to add some good color.

That’s because Marshall is a seasoned, fun interview. In addition to telling Elliott that his movie and TV product placement agency has previously turned down more than a half-dozen acquisition offers, he had this response when the reporter inquired about the Microsoft-minted price tag:

Mr. Marshall and [Corbis exec] Mr. Shenk said they could not discuss the financial terms of the deal. “Bill has a thing about not divulging financial stuff,” Mr. Marshall said, referring to Mr. Gates, adding that Mr. Shenk had told him, “‘Norm, if I do it, Bill will fire me.’”

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Andrew Ross Sorkin of The New York Times: ‘Persistence over talent wins every day’

With the New York Times financial column Dealbook and an upcoming HBO movie based on his critically acclaimed book Too Big To Fail, Andrew Ross Sorkin has had a journalism career many would envy. Surprisingly, it all started with an unofficial “internship” at the paper while he was still in high school.

“I actually wasn’t really even supposed to be in the building. I came to xerox and staple for Stuart Elliott who’s the advertising columnist,” he recalled in our Media Beat interview. “I had no intention of putting two words together, let alone a sentence. I thought I would be in and out, but I was just thrilled to be there.”

His advice for aspiring journos and college grads is simple. “One is just persistence, to get in the room. Part of it is just getting your foot in the door. Persistence over talent seems to win every day,” he said.

We also got Sorkin to answer this question from @theknowitXP, one of our @mediabeat Twitter followers: “Where do you get your inspiration, and when did you know this was ‘your thing’?” Watch the full video for the surprising details.


Part 1: Andrew Ross Sorkin on Launching and Growing The New York Times Dealbook

Part 2: NYT‘s Andrew Ross Sorkin Answers His Critics

King Of Pop Dies

mjackson.jpgWhat a strange, sad day in the entertainment world today. First, Farrah, and now a number of sources have confirmed that King of Pop Michael Jackson died this afternoon at the age of 50.

The New York Times‘ started live-blogging the coverage as soon as news broke that Jackson had been rushed to the hospital after suffering from cardiac arrest.

After the confirmation of his death was announced, the news turns to possible memorials: “Expect a number of Jackson music marathons in the days to come,” the Times reported. “According to our colleague Stuart Elliott: WCBS-FM, the oldies station in New York, is broadcasting some of Mr. Jackson’s greatest hits. The station said it would have special programming later in the day.”