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Posts Tagged ‘Tablet’

David Ho on The Daily and Creating WSJ‘s iPad App

“Technology is easy. Journalism is hard,” says the Wall Street Journal‘s mobile and tablets editor David Ho. The Journal was one of the first major newspapers to develop an iPad app, the process of which was the toughest professional challenge Ho has undertaken. “It was more than a news-journalism-tech challenge. It felt like some crazy endurance race,” he said.

And, having gone through that process of creating a news app from scratch, Ho said he empathizes with the pressure his peers at News Corp.’s The Daily likely face.

“I think everyone involved in tablet and mobile news watches The Daily. It’s this bold experiment: a brand new news organization created from scratch. How often do you see that these days? The Daily pioneered a lot of ways to deliver news on tablets,” Ho said in Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview.

“It does look like The Daily is trying to make their production process easier,” he continued. “They dropped their landscape view not long ago. That I get. Supporting two tablet rotations all the time is a lot of work. It’s tough to put out a tablet issue every day.”

Read more in So What Do You Do, David Ho, Mobile and Tablets Editor at The Wall Street Journal?

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LA Times Magazine App Given the Axe

The November issue of LA, Los Angeles Times Magazine is out Sunday, but it won’t be available for download. The magazine app, launched just this April, has been killed.

We worried this might be a bad omen. The mag lost publisher Shelley Cole during a round of LA Times lay offs in July, and LA Observed forecasts a new round of belt-tightening is on the horizon.

But LAT spokesperson Nancy Sullivan reassures us:

For the near term we have put LA’s app on hiatus as we evaluate and evolve our digital distribution strategy. The Magazine itself is not going anywhere.

Here’s hoping the app comes back. The LA magazine translates to tablet form quite well. And we’re among the many readers who don’t receive the mag with our Sunday paper. Sure, it can be found online, but the app restores the element of portability. Once we’ve downloaded, we can read it anywhere – no wifi required.

Tablet Owners Spending More Time on TV and Phones, But Less Time on PCs

Some new numbers from Nielsen show that owning a tablet is reducing the amount of time that people spend on their PCs, Ina Fried reports for All Things Digital.

According to the study, roughly a third of laptop and desktop users report using their PC less or even not at all since getting a tablet. Also, 77 percent of tablet owners say they are using their slates for things that they used to do on a PC

Conversely, according to the same study, a significant number of users say they are spending more time on their Internet-connected TVs and smartphones. So the tablet isn’t making all other technology obsolete, it’s just that PCs are the big losers so far. We’ll see how long it takes before tablets start swallowing up everything else around them.

And what kind of tablets are they using? The iPad still dominates, with about 82 percent of tablet owners using iPads. The Samsung Galaxy Tab comes in a distant second at 4 percent. Apple owns us all, pretty much.

OK! Weekly Goes Digital

ok!cover.jpgCelebrity tabloid OK! is going digital, pairing with digital publishing company Zinio to bring the magazine to computer screens and iPhones everywhere.

Until recently, Zinio, which has published digital versions of magazines, could only provide content via computer. But a recent app for iPhone and iPod Touch means that the company’s digital magazine selection, now including OK!, can be read on the go. It’s also especially timely since the world expects Apple to release its version of a tablet e-reader — which will presumably have access to iPhone apps — very soon.

So OK! looks pretty smart for launching a digital version with Zinio today. The magazine’s January 25 issue was available this morning, and new issue will now be available at midnight Wednesday each week. Readers will have free access to the first five pages of every issue, and a yearly digital subscription can be purchased for $33.99.

Said Lori Burgess, OK!‘s publisher:

“We’re an international brand with a global readership, and Zinio gives our consumers the instant access they crave, wherever they are. This is an important time of change in the publishing industry, as young, tech-savvy readers look for increasingly efficient ways to get their news and entertainment. We’re excited to be one of the publications leading the charge.”

If it can bring the magazine to iPhones and tablets, we think the deal sounds pretty promising. But now magazine publishers need to take it one step further: create a digital version that will drive conversation and add value in the digital form.

Full release after the jump

Previously: Esquire‘s New iPhone App: A ‘Reimagined’ Version Of The Mag

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Bonnier Debuts Plans For Highly Anticipated Tablet Device

Mag+ from Bonnier on Vimeo.

When Sports Illustrated revealed plans for content for the not-yet-released tablet reading device, we were impressed. The prototype seemed like a great way to integrate traditional magazine content, with large, full-color photography, bold headlines and lengthy text, into an e-reading format that has yet to be experienced by anyone.

But that was just the first of its kind. Expect other magazines and publishers to be revealing tablet prototypes in the coming months. Like publisher Bonnier Corp., which has titles like Popular Science and Saveur in its stable. Last week, the publisher released the above video of its tablet technology, created with design shop BERG.

Unlike Time Inc.‘s SI demo, Bonnier’s focuses in vertical scrolling to read articles. There is no “digital page turning,” that is common among a lot of digital versions of magazines today. As the video explains:

“The concept aims to capture the essence of magazine reading, which people have been enjoying for decades: an engaging and unique reading experience in which high-quality writing and stunning imagery build up immersive stories.”

What do you think of this concept? Is it better or worse than SI‘s? We don’t know about you, but we’re intrigued.

Previously: Sports Illustrated Puts Money On Tablet Technology

Tablet Editor Jesse Oxfeld Takes On Theatre Reviewing Duties At The Observer

observerlogo.jpgJesse Oxfeld, the current executive editor for online Jewish magazine Tablet and former editor at Mediabistro.com, Gawker and New York magazine, is taking on a new title: theater critic.

Last week, New York Post theater columnist Michael Riedel revealed that Oxfeld would be assuming the critic’s role at The New York Observer, after the paper’s longtime theater critic John Heilpern stepped down from his post.

Oxfeld, a self-proclaimed “theater obsessive,” told FishbowlNY that he “fell backwards” into the Observer‘s critic spot, “which is ridiculous and fun and a classic Broadway plotline,” he said.

Earlier this year, Oxfeld jumped at the chance to do theater coverage for the Observer as part of the paper’s plan to expand its culture coverage under new editor Tom McGeveran. But since the summer is a slow time in the theater world, Oxfeld only had the chance to write one review before Heilpern decided to depart. Now instead of playing second fiddle to Heilpern, Oxfeld will primarily take on meaty Broadway show reviews.

Read more

New Magazine Launch: Jewish Online Mag Tablet

tablet.pngIn the midst of recent magazine closures and more layoffs, it’s always heartening to see a new pub launch. And even online only content paves the way for more growth within the industry.

So let’s welcome Tablet magazine, a daily online Jewish magazine focusing on news, culture and ideas. The site is a “beefed-up, rebranded, refocused update” of Nextbook.org, explained editor-in-chief Alana Newhouse, in her welcome letter on the site. Launched in 2003, Nextbook.org published Jewish arts and culture writing, up until earlier this year. Now, Tablet takes over its mission and brings something new to the table.

“We’ve expanded our mandate to cover, break, and analyze news and politics, and will work to tie our cultural coverage much more closely to current public discourse,” Newhouse explained. “Even more important, Tablet is not simply a read. On our site, you will find lengthy pieces of in-depth journalism and cultural criticism, fiery blog posts, audio podcasts and video clips, beautiful slideshows, and bits of animation.”

Newhouse, who joined Tablet from Jewish weekly newspaper the Forward, is joined by a formidable team of journalists, including deputy editor Gabriel Sanders, who has worked for the Forward and Vanity Fair and former Gawker editor and New York magazine editor Jesse Oxfeld, who will serve as executive editor.