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Posts Tagged ‘Tad Friend’

Revisiting That Bumble Ward Interview

Now that 20th Century Fox has confirmed last week’s Mike Fleming Deadline.com scoop about Bumble Ward coming out of retirement to head up the studio’s national film publicity department, it’s worth revisiting an interview she gave to Kim Masters in 2005.

Although Ward’s LA Times phoner echoed sentiments captured in a fall 2002 New Yorker mini-profile by Tad Friend, she still managed to rankle the godfather of LA show business PR, the late Warren Cowan. Per Cowan’s response in the same newspaper five days later:

Ward’s saying that she can count on “one hand” the number of great people in PR came as a shock to me. I know hundreds of outstanding people in the PR field… I am sorry that Ward was not blessed with the feeling of pure joy that I have for an occupation that has brought me a lifetime of enjoyment.

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‘Fart,’ ‘Skank,’ and When Offensive Words First Appeared in The New Yorker

The Awl has a great post today that chronicles when several vulgar words first found their way into The New Yorker. For example, the first time “anal” appeared in the magazine was in 1994, but the first “shit” can be found in a 1976 piece titled “The Autumn of The Patriarch.”

Here’s a couple more:

slut
First used: 1974, Edna O’Brien, “The House of My Dreams”

blowjob
First used: 2003, Tad Friend, “Remake Man”

If your inner teenager is laughing, then go ahead and click through to find out more.

Nikki Finke Blasts New Yorker Profile

 deadline logo.jpgYesterday, The New Yorker published a lengthy profile of Deadline Hollywood Daily blogger Nikki Finke.

The article — which name-checks some of the biggest players in Hollywood, muses on Finke’s possible sources, describes her home office and even gets the woman of the hour on the record — is woven through with an interesting discourse about the state of journalism and reporting on Hollywood in the Internet age and Finke’s own method:

“Finke’s code is the Hollywood code. She is for hard work, big box-office, stars who remain loyal to their agents and publicists, and the little guy — until, that is, the big guy chats her up. Then she’s for that big guy until some other big guy calls to stick it to the first big guy. And this, too, is the Hollywood code: relationships are paramount but provisional. One executive observes that people who heed Finke’s call to snark about their competitors shouldn’t get too comfortable: ‘The idea is, The lion won’t eat me if I throw it another Christian. It works for a day, but you’re going back to the Colosseum soon.’”

Almost immediately, Finke posted her take on the article: a blistering take-down of the New Yorker, pointing out that the piece “didn’t lay a glove on me.” Finke said writer Tad Friend was “easy to manipulate,” and claimed she bitchslapped editor-in-chief David Remnick, “especially during the very slipshod factchecking process.” She had made the venerable magazine her “buttboy” — a favorite phrase of hers.

The article is also missing some key information on Deadline Hollywood Daily, such as how much Finke is said to have received when she sold her site to Jay Penske‘s Mail.com Media Corp. earlier this year or recent plans to expand the site. All Things Digital’s Peter Kafka is on the case, asking questions about why Finke has still has not named a New York correspondent she had planned to appoint around the end of the summer:

“For the record, in late June, Finke said she’d have a New York correspondent hired within three months; four weeks ago, Penske told me said correspondent was going to be signed within two weeks. What’s the status now? ‘Not ready to comment right now,’ Finke says via email.”

We’re getting restless waiting to see who Finke will chose to lead her East Coast division. There’s certainly no one who could match her brutal style and flippant attitude. But we’d like to see them try.

Call MeThe New Yorker

Hollywood Manipulated The New Yorker –Deadline Hollywood Daily

Nikki Finke is in The New Yorker

091012_r18911_p233.jpgWowie, Nikki Finke is now in The New Yorker? First the front page of the New York Times and now a Tad Friend piece?!

Is Nikki uber – uber-famous or are New York jounos getting lazy?

Anyway, the piece is mostly nice to Nikki.

And in case you’re wondering – of course Sharon Waxman is quoted in the piece because no one can write an article about Nikki Finke without her frenemy Sharon Waxman commenting.

This is the funniest line in there:

Waxman covered Hollywood for the Times from 2003 to 2007; though her reporting occasioned a number of corrections, she is aggressively self-confident.

Who has to have the disclaimer “her reporting occasioned a number of corrections” mentioned about them besides like Jayson Blair?

Previously on FBLA:

  • Breaking: Nikki Finke Story Maybe On Page One of NYT
  • Huffpo Takes on Sharon Waxman

    ILLUSTRATION: JAIME HERNANDEZ

  • Why I Followed Andrew Sullivan to the Financial District

    It’s sort of fitting that my last FBNY post should be about The Atlantic dinner/conversation I attended earlier this evening, which featured Michael Hirschorn and Andrew Sullivan, since this post was actually my first foray into this whole blogging thing (and remains my top Google result).

    The talk — the dinner part included chili, cornbread, and brownies — was billed in the invite as “A Conversation on the Future of Media” and the crowd that packed Justin Smith‘s downtown apartment included a whole lot of very recognizable New York Media names who will no doubt be heavily involved in that very Future. Here’s a non-exhaustive list: Bonnie Fuller, Harry Smith, Richard Perez-Pena, Nick Denton, Tad Friend, Duff McDonald, Gabriel Snyder, Jeff Bercovici, Matt Haber, Danny Shea, Brian Stelter, Rachel Sklar, Jon Fine, Dylan Stableford, Laurel Touby, James Bennett…and also, strangely(?), (the very tall) Sigourney Weaver.

    Alas, neither Sullivan nor Hirschorn appeared to have any definite ideas about what ‘Media’ might look in the future other than that it would probably be very different from what we currently have, but also that the New York Times is in a lot of trouble. For those of you keeping score Andrew Sullivan still reads the dead tree edition of the Times every morning and does not Twitter. @LaurelTouby, @BrianStelter, and @RachelSklar, however, all have nice tweets from the party. Now(!), before I sign off for good here’s a couple of other interesting things I read today:

  • Choire speculating on, among other things, the equality of words.
  • Chris Lehmann talking about his “crash course in the staggering unselfawareness of Manhattan class privilege.”
  • Gay Talese, who is described solely in this article as “an author who writes on the sex trade.” Ahem.

  • Garry Trudeau on journos “Smitten With The Idea Of A Personal Broadcasting System” Also, Twitter’s greatest hits…and misses.

  • This, for reasons which will become clear at some point tomorrow.
  • And this, because it’s had me laughing all day. The video in the top corner of this post, by the way, is purely for the enjoyment of my managing editor Rebecca Fox, and for the edification of my Menu cohort Steve Krakauer.
  • Hesser on Leaving NYT: ‘The Economy is Tanking — It’s the Perfect Time to Start a Company’

    Hesser, Amanda(3).jpgNew York Times food writer Amanda Hesser emailed us to confirm previous rumors that she will be leaving the paper after 11 years there to start an Internet company, but denied accepting a buyout after being asked to leave. More on her departure and the new venture, which has “nothing to do with food or journalism” after the jump…

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