TVNewser Show TVNewser FishbowlDC AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote PRNewser SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘The Associated Press’

San Diego Fireworks Photo Goes Viral

Local entrepreneur/blogger/Twitter icon Ben Baller captured this amazing photo of the fireworks malfunction at the “Big Bay Boom” in San Diego.

It was such a great photo that it instantly went viral and even The Associated Press picked up the image.

(Photo: Ben Baller)

The AP Sues Meltwater News

The Associated Press is suing Meltwater News — a media intelligence software service  — claiming that Meltwater has repeatedly infringed on the company’s copyrighted material, and often copies AP stories word for word. Tom Curley, the President and CEO of the AP, had some harsh words for Meltwater.

“Meltwater News is a parasitic distribution service that competes directly with traditional news sources without paying license fees to cover the costs of creating those stories,” Curley said in a press release. “It has a significant negative impact on the ability of AP to continue providing the high-quality news reports on which the public relies.”

The AP says that the Meltwater lawsuit shouldn’t be taken as an attack on sites who link to AP news stories because Meltwater does it in the wrong way.

“Meltwater is not a typical news aggregator,” said Laura Malone, the AP’s general counsel.

Major Media Companies Unite to Launch NewsRight

Yesterday, 29 media companies including The Associated Press, The New York Times Company, and Hearst announced the launch of NewsRight. The venture is described as “an independent digital rights and content licensing organization.”

Headed by former ABC news president, David Westin, NewsRight has been in development for a few years under different names including News Registry, a property spearheaded by the AP.

“More news is available more ways than ever in history. But if reliable information is to continue to flourish, the companies investing in creating content need efficient ways to license it as broadly as possible,” said Westin. “NewsRight’s mission is to make sure consumers continue to benefit from the all the original news reporting they want while ensuring those who republish content do so with integrity. ”

In a nutshell, the service makes it easier for media outlets to license news content from the roster of NewsRight companies and in turn, provide both licensees and licensors with analytics regarding the use of content.

Read more

Frank Baker Named AP California News Editor

Frank Baker was named California news editor for The Associated Press, the news agency announced Wednesday.

Baker, a 23-year veteran of the AP, was the assistant chief of bureau in Los Angeles.

In this newly created position, Baker will continue to be based in Los Angeles and oversee Southern California news editor Brian Melley, Northern California news editor Tim Reiterman and Sacramento correspondent Tom Verdin.

“Baker’s appointment to California news editor ensures AP will produce a timely, comprehensive state report that meets the needs of our customers,” said Anthony Marquez, chief of bureau for Southern California.”With his experience and knowledge of the state, Baker is the perfect fit.”

The AP Releases 9/11 Style Guide

There are going to be a ton of stories written about 9/11 as the 10th anniversary of the tragedy approaches us, and to assist journalists, the Associated Press has released a reference guide full of facts and tips. As noted by Nieman Journalism Lab, it’s useful yet cold, a reminder of the event presented in a stark, no-nonsense format.

David Minthorn, the AP’s Deputy Standards Editor, said that the style guide’s size is unusual for being tied to a single news story, but 9/11 made it necessary. “This is a momentous occasion, a momentous anniversary. We want to, particularly for our own staff, make sure everybody is conforming to certain spellings and definitions,” he said.

Some items from the guide:

  • Flight 93: Acceptable in first reference for United Airlines Flight 93, which crashed near Shanksville, Pa. Include airline name and context of crash in subsequent references. Flight 93 memorial is acceptable in all references for the Flight 93 National Memorial at the crash site.
  • ground zero: Acceptable term for the World Trade Center site.
  • The Sept. 11 attacks killed nearly 3,000 people: 2,753 in New York. Includes three later deaths from respiratory disease that have since been linked to illnesses caused by the towers’ collapse. 40 in Pennsylvania. 184 at the Pentagon. Total: 2,977 as of July 25, 2011. 2,983 names will be listed on the Sept. 11 memorial, including six who died in the 1993 World Trade Center truck bombing.

AP to Open Bureau in North Korea

The Associated Press is going to open a bureau in Pyongyang, North Korea. According to an AP press release, the agreement between the news company and the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) will make the AP the first permanent Western text and photo news outlet in the country’s capital.

AP CEO Tom Curley said in the release that the agreement was “historic and significant.” But this is North Korea. A country that hasn’t ever exactly embraced the concept of freedom, let alone freedom of the press. Kathleen Carroll, the Executive Editor for the AP, told the Huffington Post that it won’t be an issue. ”The AP operates independently, regardless of location. Period,” she said.

We’ll see about that, won’t we?

Associated Press Names New Political Editor

The Associated Press has promoted Liz Sidoti from Chief Political Writer to Political Editor. Sidoti has covered national politics for the AP since 2003. In her new role she’ll lead a Washington-based team of political writers and oversee AP journalists that are positioned in every state’s capital.

Sally Buzbee, the AP’s Washington Bureau Chief, says that Sidoti’s experience will serve her well:

Liz’s career is steeped in AP’s rich tradition of being first with political news; she’s a ferocious competitor. Even more remarkable is her ability to push and improve the work of those around her. She is a model for how journalists can cut through the political noise and fit the pieces together to explain what is happening in politics and why it matters to people beyond the nation’s capital.

 

Journalists Detained in Libya to be Released

The last we heard from Clare Gillisa journalist for The Atlantic – she was calling her parents from Libya to tell them that she was in good health. That was at the end of April, and while her parents were hopeful that the phone call would lead to her release, it hasn’t happened. Until now, that is.

According to The Associated Press, Gillis, along with James Foley, Manu Brabo, and an unnamed journalist, will be released from Libya today or tomorrow:

Ibrahim [a Libyan government Spokesperson] said the four journalists were returned to detention following the hearing on charges that they ‘entered the country illegally,’ suggesting they had not applied for and received visas before arriving to work in Libya.

He also said that arrangements were being made for their repatriation. He did not know if they would be required to pay fines before leaving.

Let’s hope that’s not the case, because they’ve surely been through enough already.

AP, Shepard Fairey Settle Obama Poster Case

The Associated Press and artist Shepard Fairey have reached a settlement on the “Obama poster” incident. In case you never read anything, the AP said that Fairey infringed on their rights by using an AP picture as the basis for Fairey’s now iconic rendering of Obama. Fairey believed that his use of the image was correct under copyright laws.

Under the settlement, Fairey agreed to never use another AP image in his art without obtaining a proper license, and the AP will now work with Fairey in producing more of the posters. Fairey will also be given the rights to several AP pictures that he will use to create new images. There was also money involved, but that wasn’t disclosed.

Fairey sounds happy to have the case resolved:

I respect the work of photographers, as well as recognize the need to preserve opportunities for other artists to make fair use of photographic images.  I often collaborate with photographers in my work, and I look forward to working with photos provided by the AP’s talented photographers.

So did anyone win here? It sure does seem like Fairey got the better of the deal, especially since he’s going to get more images from the AP. But then the AP also benefits from that, so maybe it’s a win for both sides. Let’s just hope no one Obama-izes themselves anymore, because really, that stopped being funny two days after it started.

Is The Associated Press Running On Slave Labor?

2222a222.jpg

No one in their right mind is going to tell you that journalism — especially online journalism — pays very well. Sure, there are a couple of examples where people have made names for themselves and ended up a featured (and well paid) columnist for a newspaper’s website or a blog, but overall you’d be better off being a waitress if you were in this gig for the money. (Look no further than our own ex-Fishbowler Amanda Ernst for a clue.)

Yet we’re still shocked to hear that a source as big as The Associated Press still manages to undercut its writers, especially since this is the same company that makes such a stink about online aggregators making money off its content.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>