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Posts Tagged ‘The Atlantic’

AP Adds Another Film Writer

Lindsey BahrStarting next month, New York-based AP film writer Jake Coyle will have a new partner in cinematic crime.

Lindsey Bahr, who will be based in Los Angeles, is coming over to the wire service from Entertainment Weekly. From this morning’s announcement, tipped to ABC News:

Bahr, 30, has reported on all facets of the film business at EW, including the Oscars and other major award shows, film festivals, breaking news, trend stories, talent profiles and box office analysis. She also reviewed movies and contributed to EW‘s video, photo and Sirius XM radio formats.

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Mediabistro Course

Personal Essay Writing: Master Class

Personal Essay Writing: Master ClassStarting October 21, work with the senior editor at Marie Claire magazine to polish and publish your essay! Whitney Joiner will help you to develop your voice, narrative, and identity, draft your pitch, and decide where to market your essay. Register now!

Morning Media Newsfeed: Baquet Changes NYT Masthead | Comcast Responds to Merger Critics

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Big Changes to NYT Masthead (FishbowlNY)
Dean Baquet, the New York Times’ executive editor, has officially revamped the paper’s masthead. Gone is the “managing editor” title; it’s being replaced by four “deputy executive editors,” who “have already proven they can run stories that take on big institutions, who have covered a world of war and proven they can lead with humanity.” NYT They are Susan Chira, Janet Elder, Matthew Purdy and Ian Fisher. A fifth editor, Tom Bodkin, will be given the title of creative director, a position equal to the four deputy executive editors. Politico / Dylan Byers on Media Through these changes Baquet hopes to make the relationship between the Times’ digital and print sides more fluid. “I anticipate people moving on and off the masthead as our needs evolve,” he wrote in a memo to staff Wednesday, “and it is important that these moves not be seen as measures of who is up and who is down, but rather as appointments aimed at keeping our journalism and our entire operation as vibrant as possible.” Capital New York The appointments reflect a push for better coordination and cooperation between departments as the Times works on pushing out its journalism to digital readers more effectively. Other recent appointments along these lines include Arthur Gregg Sulzberger as senior editor for strategy, Alex MacCallum as assistant managing editor for audience development and Sam Dolnick as senior editor for mobile. HuffPost Wednesday’s masthead changes are the biggest since Baquet took the reins, but there have been several other moves internally in recent months. Baquet announced the addition of several deputy-level editors in the newsroom in July.

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Bill Mulvihill Joins The Atlantic as Associate Publisher

Bill Mulvihill has been named associate publisher of The Atlantic. Mulvihill comes to the company from Vanity Fair, where he most recently served as national advertising director. He had been with Vanity Fair since 2011.

Prior to his time with Vanity Fair, Mulvihill was Entertainment Weekly’s East Coast advertising director for three years.

“Bill is a venerable talent in the business, with a great wealth of experience and strong connections with stellar brands,” said Hayley Romer, The Atlantic’s publisher and VP, in a statement. “We are thrilled to welcome him to The Atlantic.”

Mulvihill will join The Atlantic next month.

Morning Media Newsfeed: Chernin, AT&T Strike Deal With Fullscreen | The Wire Shuttered

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Peter Chernin, AT&T to Buy Majority Stake in YouTube Network Fullscreen (THR)
Peter Chernin’s The Chernin Group and AT&T have finalized a deal to acquire a majority stake in YouTube network Fullscreen. GigaOM Financial details of the transaction weren’t released, but Fullscreen CEO George Strompolos, who previously handled partner relations for YouTube, will retain “a material ownership stake in the company,” according to the release. Re/code The sale is supposed to wrap up in the next month; ad holding giant WPP, which invested in Fullscreen earlier, will remain as a “strategic shareholder.” The deal is likely to value Fullscreen, which says it has 4 billion monthly video views, between $200 million and $300 million. Earlier in the year, Disney bought YouTube network Maker Studios, which had 5.5 billion views, in a deal that could ultimately hit $950 million. That sale kicked off a new wave of investor interest in Web video networks, which for now generate most of their eyeballs and revenue on YouTube. Capital New York Dreamworks acquired YouTube channel AwesomenessTV in 2011 for $150 million, Discovery acquired Revision3 in 2012 for $30 million, and Legendary Entertainment bought Nerdist for an undisclosed sum in 2012. Variety Fullscreen, founded in January 2011, works with more than 50,000 content creators — including such YouTube stars as the Fine Bros., Connor Franta and O2L — who have an aggregate of 450 million subscribers. The Culver City, Calif.-based company has about 200 employees worldwide.

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The Atlantic Shutters The Wire

The Wire GThe Atlantic is shutting down its spinoff TheWire.com, and folding staffers into the magazine and TheAtlantic.com.

In a memo to staffers, Atlantic Media co-presidents James Bennet and Bob Cohn were blunt — the site just wasn’t successful enough to keep it going:

Important news on the digital front: In a couple of weeks, we will bring the staff of The Wire back into The Atlantic’s fold. We are very proud of what The Wire has accomplished editorially, and we think that joining its aggressive, deft news coverage with The Atlantic’s ideas-driven journalism will provide a richer experience for The Atlantic’s readers, a firmer foundation for our ambitions to cover the news, and greater opportunities for growth for The Wire’s team. This decision is also driven by a recognition that the business strategy behind separating The Wire from The Atlantic simply hasn’t proven out. Experimenting with new revenue streams to support our journalism – like experimenting with new forms of reporting, storytelling, and distribution — has been essential to our progress across the ever-shifting media landscape; so too has moving quickly to face the facts, and to adjust, when an experiment isn’t working as we’d hoped.

The Atlantic Wire was launched in 2009 and rebranded itself as The Wire last year. The decision to rename the site the exact same name as one of the most iconic TV shows of all time was probably the first sign that something was amiss.

You can read Bennet and Cohn’s full note below.

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Scott Stossel Discusses The Atlantic

scott stossel GScott Stossel, editor of The Atlantic, has a lot of interesting things to say in an interview with the Nieman Foundation. For starters, he declared himself “platform agnostic” and openly discussed the benefits of folding the magazine and going digital-only. Like we said, interesting! Below are some highlights from the piece.

On a digital-only Atlantic:

My hope is that we’ll continue to get enough print advertising to invest in the print product. But I’m platform agnostic. In fact, if we could suddenly convert our 500,000 print subscribers—all of them pay, even though all the content is free on the Web—to digital subscribers and scrap the print magazine, our bottom line would be so much better. We could pay writers more because we wouldn’t be paying for printing and mailing.

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New Monthly Print Magazine Pays Its Way to 400,000+ Circulation

CaliforniaSundayLogoOn Sunday October 5, more than 400,000 subscribers to the San Francisco Chronicle, Sacramento Bee and Los Angeles Times will find something new within the bundle on their doorstep: The California Sunday Magazine, a startup devised by freelancer Douglas McGray and Federated Media co-founder Chas Ewards.

The monthly, print-side half of the pair’s business model is most intriguing. Not only does it give them instant traction at both the advertiser and circulation-base ends. But if successful, it could prove to be a model of revenue for other grouped regional newspapers. From a piece by Michael Learmonth, global tech editor of the International Business Times:

McGray and Edwards are paying the newspapers for distribution, much like Target would for an ad insert, and targeting 400,000 people who live in affluent neighborhoods. The rate card for the print edition is $40,000 a page; Edwards says the magazine will launch with 10 advertisers, including Google Play, Lexus, Converse, MailChimp and the Ace Hotel.

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All the Competition News That’s Fit to Recall

newyorktimes-logoThe answer to this great trivia question is: D.M. Redfield. He’s the New Haven, Connecticut reader whose proposed new motto for the New York Times was declared the winner back in 1896.

Wisely, in the end, the NYT decided to stick with “All the news that’s fit to print.” From Adrienne LaFrance‘s item for The Altantic about the paper’s $100 tagline-our-paper competition:

The Times wrote that it had received entries from nearly every state in the union — there were 45 of them in 1896 — and signaled out entries from women. Many contestants “wholly ignored the request for a motto or phrase of only ten words of less,” the Times wrote. Some of the other ideas that readers sent:

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Chopper Crash Injures NYT Reporter | Tribune Media Profits Up

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newyorktimes-logo

NYT Correspondent Injured in Iraq Helicopter Crash (TVNewser)
New York Times reporter Alissa Rubin was injured when the relief helicopter she was traveling in crashed Tuesday, killing the pilot. The helicopter was on a mission to aid Yazidi refugees in Iraq. FishbowlNY According to crash survivors, the helicopter went down shortly after takeoff. The cause of the incident has yet to be confirmed. NYT Rubin, 56, the Times’ Paris bureau chief and a longtime war correspondent, apparently suffered a concussion, at least one broken wrist and possibly some broken ribs but was conscious. Adam Ferguson, 35, a freelance photographer working for the Times who was accompanying Rubin, said via cellphone text that he suffered a sore jaw and some minor bumps. HuffPost Rubin has a long history of war reporting. She was the bureau chief for the Times in both Baghdad and Kabul before transferring to Paris. Time Iraqi parliamentarian Vian Dakhil was among the survivors of the crash. Dakhil garnered international attention for her impassioned pleas on the floor of Iraq’s parliament to deliver aide to tens of thousands of Yazidis, a religious minority that fled into the mountains as ISIS fighters advanced northward into the Kurdish region of Iraq. A Kurdish official told the Times that the cause of the crash appeared to have been an accident and that no ISIS fighters were seen in the area at the time.

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Post Headline Mangles Hillary Clinton Remarks

The Web headline for today’s New York Post pick-up of Hillary Clinton‘s interview with The Atlantic‘s Jeffrey Goldberg gets it a little less wrong. It reads: “Hillary Slams Obama for ‘Stupid’ Foreign Policies.”

NYPost_0811_Front

But per Brooklyn-based Business Insider politics reporter Colin Campbell, the front page of today’s print editions (above) is completely off the transcription track:

The phrase “stupid policy” doesn’t appear anywhere in The Atlantic‘s 6,200-word transcript of the Clinton interview where she criticized President Barack Obama.

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