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Posts Tagged ‘The Boston Globe’

Author Joseph Finder Revisits ‘The Bravest Thing I Ever Did’

JosephFinderSuspicionIn keeping with a basic tenet of thriller novels – waste no time setting the scene, large – Boston Globe reporter Joseph Kahn gets his piece about local bestselling author Joseph Finder rolling with this compelling first paragraph:

After publishing 10 suspense novels, two of them bestsellers turned into Hollywood movies, Joseph Finder had what most writers would sell their souls for: brand-name author status; a seven-figure, multi-book deal with a major publisher; a list of his previous works aggressively marketed by his publisher; and a loyal readership for virtually anything he wrote.

That was then (2012) and the rest of Kahn’s feature is now. After becoming unhappy with the direction of the partnership, Finder gambled big-time on himself, writing a seven-figure check to get out of his St. Martin’s Press deal and writing his next novel, Suspicion, on spec.

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New York Times Company Vet: ‘Micro-Payments Are Ultimately the Future’

At the recent Future of Media conference put on by UK newspaper The Scotsman, there was some very informative field intelligence shared by Jeff Moriarty.

JohnstonPressLogoMoriarty is currently the chief digital and product officer for Johnston Press. But previously, he spent several decades with the New York Times Company and was an instrumental part of the Boston Globe‘s transition to the paywall world. Via post-keynote interview  with The Drum’s Angela Haggerty, Johnston suggested that price is not the main factor when it comes to online-content subscribers. It’s more a matter of people willing to pay for content vs. those who are not:

The future of paid content is something Moriarty believes will be best-served on a micro-payment model similar to that of iTunes, although he said it could take years for the industry to create it.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Court Torn Over Aereo | Time Inc. Board Revealed | Comcast Gains Soar

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Supreme Court Justices Express Concern Over Scope of Aereo Ruling (TVNewser)
While hearing oral arguments from attorneys representing the broadcast networks and Aereo Tuesday morning, the Supreme Court justices “appeared unsure” how to rule in the case. Reuters Aereo, backed by media mogul Barry Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp, could be forced to shut down if the court rules for the companies challenging the startup. A win for Aereo could spur innovation in the television industry by paving the way to new, cheaper ways for consumers to watch shows. A decision is due by the end of June. Bloomberg Hearing arguments Tuesday in Washington, some justices suggested they viewed Aereo as violating broadcaster copyrights by using thousands of dime-sized antennas to get over-the-air signals without paying fees. “There’s no technological reason for you to have 10,000 dime-sized antennas other than to get around the copyright laws?” Chief Justice John Roberts asked. At the same time, the hour-long hearing didn’t clearly indicate the likely outcome, as justices including Stephen Breyer repeatedly asked whether a ruling favoring the broadcasters would imperil the cloud computing business. Variety Some of the justices on Tuesday suggested that they faced a challenge in defining just what Aereo is, and drawing a line on where privately used consumer technology ends and a publicly performing service begins. The Washington Post Aereo argued that its thousands of antennas are essentially rented to subscribers of its $8-a-month service for users to pull programs from the public airwaves legally and then store in Internet server files to watch at their convenience. In that way, it is just a mediator, the company argued, with consumers in control of how they use the company’s antennas and storage files for pulling and recording programs from the airwaves. Most of the arguments, which lasted more than an hour, were focused on the justice’s queries about the definition of public and private performances in copyright law and how Aereo differs from cable, satellite and other Internet video firms that pay broadcasters retransmission and other license fees.

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Morning Media Newsfeed: Pulitzers Announced | Google Buys Drone Maker | Relativity Eyes Maker Studios

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2014 Pulitzer Prizes Announced (FishbowlNY)
The Pulitzer Prizes celebrate the best of the best, and Monday we learned the latest recipients of journalism’s highest honor. TVNewser The Washington Post and the U.S. edition of The Guardian have won the award. They will share the Public Service award for their series of stories on NSA surveillance, as revealed by Edward Snowden, an NSA contractor who gave the top-secret information to the news organizations. The Pulitzer committee said the journalism was “marked by authoritative and insightful reports that helped the public understand how the disclosures fit into the larger framework of national security.” Politico Snowden immediately declared the decision “a vindication.” The reporting on the former government contractor’s leaks was led by journalists Glenn Greenwald and Ewan McAskill at The Guardian, Barton Gellman at the Post, and Laura Poitras, who worked with both newspapers. NYT The Boston Globe won the breaking news prize for its coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, which killed three people and wounded at least 260. The Post won a second award, for explanatory journalism. Eli Saslow, 31, a staff writer, won for a series of articles on American families that rely on the federal food stamp program. GalleyCat Author Donna Tartt won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her book The Goldfinch. The novel about an orphan also won Amazon’s Best Books of the Month “Spotlight Pick” in October 2013 and was shortlisted for 2013 National Book Critics Circle Award.

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John Henry Names Himself Publisher of Boston Globe

John Henry GJohn Henry is not only the relatively new owner of The Boston Globe, he’s also the publisher. Henry, who bought the Globe from The New York Times Company for $70 million last October, has tapped himself for the role. This is the kind of decision you can make when you own things.

In an announcement, Henry said “My main role as publisher is to ensure that the Globe has the right management and that management has the resources to accomplish its mission.”

In other Globe news, Henry named Mike Sheehan CEO. Sheehan was formerly a CEO at the ad agency Hill Holliday.

Boston Globe Closing Date: October 15

The New York Times Company and John Henry have agreed to October 15 as the closing date for the sale of The Boston Globe. Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox, had his $70 million bid for the Globe accepted by the Times in August.

According to The Boston Business Journal’s sources, Henry is taking his new property quite seriously. Henry and his wife, Linda Pizzuti, have maintained a “near-daily presence” at the Globe since they won the bidding process. Their focus has been on where to move the Globe, as each proposal to purchase Globe included plans to move the paper from its current headquarters to a smaller, less expensive space.

The Globe currently occupies a building on Morrissey Blvd., valued anywhere from $29 million to $71 million. Experts claim that reclassifying the property as residential would probably increase its value above Henry’s $70 million offer for the Globe.

NY Times Rumored to Sell The Boston Globe to John Henry, Boston Red Sox Owner [Update]

All the speculation about who will be the new owner of the Boston Globe might have just ended, via a baseball journalist’s digging. Peter Gammons is reporting that the New York Times is selling the paper to John Henry, the owner of the Boston Red Sox.

Henry wasn’t among the main rumored buyers, but he apparently submitted his own bid after the New England Sports Network pulled out.

We’ve reached out to the Times for comment, and we’ll update when we hear back.

Update (8/3 9:25 am):
The Times has confirmed that Henry is the new owner of the Globe. He is purchasing it for $70 million in cash, a far cry from the $1.1 billion the Times paid for it in 1993.

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Despite Paper’s Troubles, Boston Globe Mag Still Looking for Good Writers

Boston Globe Magazine

The Boston Globe may be up for sale, but, until its parent company accepts a winning bid, the show must go on. And that means its Sunday supplement, The Boston Globe Magazine, is still eager to work with writers to cover a wide range of newsy local topics and industry trends. The weekly uses freelancers for over three-quarters of its content.

A redesign in March of 2012 updated the look of the magazine and added a few new columns to the front-of-book section called “Boston Uncommon.” The magazine aims to speak to a diverse audience — men and women of many economic and educational backgrounds –- and focus on Greater Boston and occasionally New England.” Readers tell us that The Boston Globe Magazine is one of the most popular sections of the Sunday Globe,” said editor-in-chief Susanne Althoff.

For pitching etiquette and editors’ contact info, read How To Pitch: Globe Magazine.

Sherry Yuan

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Seven Buyers to Bid for Boston Globe

When The New York Times Company decided to put The Boston Globe up for sale, the list of rumored buyers almost immediately ballooned to about 700. Now, according to the Globe, that list has dwindled to seven.

With the June 27 deadline to submit offers looming, the following groups have emerged as likely buyers:

  • Jack Griffin and two members of the Taylor family
  • Former Globe president Rick Daniels and Heb Ryan
  • The Kraft Group, owner of the New England Patriots
  • Revolution Capital Group, a LA-based private equity firm
  • Najafi Cos., owners of the Phoenix Suns
  • Douglas Manchester, owner of the U-T San Diego
  • John J. Gormally Jr., Gormally Broadcasting

The Times company is looking to sell its New England Media Group, which includes the Globe and its web presence, but also The Worcester Telegram & Gazette and its site, the Globe’s direct mail business, and an almost 50 percent ownership of Metro Boston.

The Times bought the Globe in 1993 for $1.1 billion. The offers from the buyers listed above are expected to range between $70 and $120 million. That’s uh, close!

[Image: Newseum]

Mark Thompson ‘Very Pleased’ With Efforts to Sell Boston Globe

The New York Times Company officially put The Boston Globe up for sale in late February, so naturally, everyone wants an update on the situation. Aside from a list of about 800 rumored buyers, there hasn’t been any word. However, Mark Thompson, the Times’ CEO, said things are going great.

The Globe reports that during an investor conference call, Thompson explained that he was “very pleased with the interest, and the progress, that’s been expressed so far.”

Okay, that’s about as vague as it gets. One nugget we did find though: Evercore Group, which is responsible for fetching bids for the Globe, has already conducted meetings with six different interested parties. Who were they? Know one knows! But apparently they were very pleasing. So please be pleased.

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