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Posts Tagged ‘The Boston Globe’

Pretty Much Everyone is Rumored to Buy The Boston Globe

Ever since the New York Times Company announced that it was selling the Boston Globe, people have been speculating about who/what will purchase the paper.

Because the media is nothing but precise, that list has now been narrowed down to about 834 potential buyers. Below are all the ones we found mentioned, but we’ve surely missed one or 500.

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New York Times Company to Sell Boston Globe

The New York Times Company is seeking a buyer for the Boston Globe. The company has teamed up with Evercore Partners to help sell its New England Media Group, which includes the Globe and its website; the Worcester Telegram & Gazette and its site; and GlobeDirect, the Globe’s direct mail company.

“We are very proud of our association with the Globe and the Telegram & Gazette, but given the differences between these businesses and The New York Times, we believe that a sale is in the best long-term interests of these properties and the employees who work for them as well as in the best interests of our shareholders,” said Mark Thompson, CEO of the Times Company, in a statement.

This wouldn’t be the first time the Times has tried to sell the Globe. In 2009, as the Globe hemorrhaged money, the Times considered ditching the paper. The Times relented when cutbacks reduced the Globe’s overall losses. Plus, the bids the Times did receive weren’t exactly enticing.

The Times bought the Globe for $1.1 billion in 1993. We doubt the company is hoping for anything near that figure this time around.

Newspapers Lease Office Space to Make Extra Cash

Times are certainly tough for the newspaper industry. So tough, in fact, that many have started leasing out office space to make some extra cash. The New York Times reports that a paper it owns — The Boston Globe — has rented out empty space to startups and even bands:

The projects occupy what looks like a re-created living room, where a colorful mix of young entrepreneurs, gray-haired journalists and bands with names like the Street Dogs and Animal Kingdom pass through. Steps away, Globe reporters and editors pore over articles.

The Globe isn’t the only paper doing this. The Los Angeles Times is getting additional revenue by renting out its space to movie studios. Anyone seen Argo? The newsroom featured in the film is unused LA Times space.

We don’t blame newspapers for doing this, after all, they might as well make use of empty desks. But we draw the line the second a Kevin James movie is allowed to film in one of their offices. There must be ethical standards.

Brian McGrory Named Editor of Boston Globe

Brian McGrory, a 23 year veteran of the Boston Globe, has been named the paper’s new editor. McGrory joined the Globe in 1989 as one of the first staffers to serve in the paper’s South Weekly section. Since then he has held a variety of roles, including White House correspondent, general reporter, and national correspondent.

“Brian has distinguished himself throughout his career at the Globe as a reporter, editor and columnist and as a native of Boston, he is the ideal candidate to lead the Globe’s newsroom,” said the Globe’s publisher, Christopher Mayer, in a statement. “Brian will continue to emphasize the accountability reporting that has been the Globe’s trademark, combined with narrative storytelling that gives readers a strong sense of our unique community.”

“This is a great honor to guide the Boston Globe news operations, since I grew up delivering the Globe, then reading the Globe, and later writing for the Globe,” added McGrory. “It is also a great honor to work with my colleagues and build on what I believe is the best metro newspaper in America.”

The Boston Globe Rolls Dice on New Paywall Site

For many years, if you wanted to get your Boston Globe fix, you navigated your browser to Boston.com. However, beginning today, there’s a new spot for the paper’s faithful: BostonGlobe.com. Print subscribers will be able to access the site for free, and until October 1 registered users can view content, but after that it’ll cost $3.99 a week, or $208 a year, for non-print subscribers.

Sounds normal, right? The paper wants to start charging for its online features. But here’s the odd thing: Boston.com will remain online and free. Christopher M. Mayer, Publisher of The Boston Globe, said there is a good reason for that.

“Our research showed that we have different segments of news consumers in our market, and we need to reach them in different ways,” explained Mayer. “We are also providing advertisers a new opportunity to connect with a premier reader base in an uncluttered and innovative new format.” It’s a nice thought, but maybe not the smartest.

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The Boston Globe Is Not for Sale

We have to admit, when we heard Aaron Kushner – a really rich guy – was planning on bidding $200 million for The Boston Globe, we got a little excited. The plans he talked about sounded inspiring to us. Well, Janet Robinson has rained on our parade, because she told Globe staffers the paper “is not for sale.”

Obviously this means things are better for the Globe, so we should just shut up and be happy. Robinson said that the paper’s finances have improved recently and she was only commenting to calm the rampant Kushner rumors. She also told the Globe that there was more to the New York Times holding onto it than just money:

One of the things we say often, and it can’t be said enough in this community: The New York Times is very proud of The Boston Globe. We’re very proud of the progress we’ve made. We’re very proud of its commitment to quality journalism.

If you didn’t count, that’s proud times three. Or proud to the third power. Or a proud tricycle.

Okay, we’ll stop now.

Businessman to Bid $200 Million for The Boston Globe

Here’s something to get you in a good mood before heading out into a weekend full of plans that you abandon by noon tomorrow: Aaron Kushner, an entrepreneur, is expected to bid $200 million for The Boston Globe.

The Globe – which is owned by The New York Times Company – has been losing money, much like every other newspaper. But Kushner apparently has a plan to turn it around. Thankfully, he’s been getting plenty of people to advise him on just how to do that:

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Six Finalists Announced For Investigative Reporting Prize

twitter-logo22.jpgOn March 23, one group of intrepid reporters will be winning $25,000 for the 2010 Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting. The six finalists announced today come from such varied locales and media as KHOU-TV in Houston, The Boston Globe, and ProPublica. Being a finalist carries a $10,000 award. Who says that journalism doesn’t pay?

According to the Harvard Kennedy School of Government’s Web site, the goal of the Goldsmith prize is to “recognize and encourage journalism which promotes more effective and ethical conduct of government, the making of public policy, or the practice of politics by disclosing excessive secrecy, impropriety and mismanagement, or instances of particularly commendable government performance.”

See the full list of winners after the jump.

Read More: Shorenstein Center Announces Book Prize Winners and Finalists for the 2010 Goldsmith Prize for Investigative Reporting — Harvard Kennedy School

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AOL-Time Warner Merger Retrospective|Newsmax|Demand Media Manifesto|British Journo Hamer Killer In Afghanistan|Fashionista.com Gets New Editor|Boston Globe Union Prez Update

New York Times: Another look at what went so wrong with the Time Warner-AOL merger.

Financial Times: A profile of Newsmax.

All Things D: A Demand Media manifesto.

Washington Post: British journalist Rupert Hamer was killed Sunday by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan.

Fashion Week Daily: Fashionista.com editor Abby Gardner has made an exit from the blog, and will be replaced by Lauren Sherman, formerly of Forbes.

Media Nation: A federal investigation provides an explanation for why the president of The Boston Globe‘s union, Dan Totten, signed another union officer’s name to his paycheck, an action that resulted in him being removed from union management.

FishbowlNY’s 2009 Lists: New York Media’s Biggest Business Decisions

4 times square.jpgNew York is home to some of the biggest media companies in the country, like Condé Nast, The New York Times Co., News Corp., Hearst and Time Warner, just to name a few.

This year, those companies were imperiled, struggling to survive like many other companies around the world. But as print media disputed declarations that its days were numbered, these once-great companies that made their money from print pubs were fighting hard to keep their heads above water. In order to do that they made some decisions — like bringing in new investors, closing publications and selling them off. It was in no way a big year for media deals, but there were a few. Below, our list of the biggest business stories to come out of the New York media world this year.

Bloomberg LP Buys BusinessWeek

After seeking a buyer for BusinessWeek for most of the fall, publisher McGraw-Hill finally cut a deal with Bloomberg LP, which snapped up the magazine in October. The result? Bloomberg BusinessWeek, a new vision of the mag that has a new editor and a smaller staff.

After the jump, Carlos Slim invests in the Times, classical music and the Comcast-NBCU deal.

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