FishbowlDC TVNewser TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘The Business Insider’

Local News Outlets Cover Times Pay Wall Plans

nyt logo.jpgThe New York Times announcement yesterday about plans to launch a pay wall model on its Web site next year, wasn’t just a big story for the media — it was also a big story for New York City.

Appropriately enough, New York’s media was on the case, with NY1 and others reporting the breaking news.

The New York Times will make you pay,” started Keith Kelly‘s story in The New York Post today, “Times online pinch”. “The Times announced yesterday that it will end its free-for-all online service and start charging to read complete articles.”

New York-based Henry Blodget, CEO and editor-in-chief of The Business Insider even sounded off, calling it “the right move.”

And New York magazine’s Daily Intel blog, which first published word of the Times metered pay wall plans, said the announcement had nothing to do with Apple’s expected announcement of its new tablet device next week, as rumored. “[D]espite the fevered speculation of just what the Apple device might be, publishers like the Times are taking a revised view about the tablet’s potential to reinvent their digital businesses,” reporter Gabriel Sherman said.

Sherman also quizzed Rob Grimshaw, of the Financial Times to see what the Times metering system might look like.

Read more: Times online pinchNew York Post

Why the Times Is Wary of an Apple Tablet DealNew York magazine

So Blodget, What Do You Think Of This Paywall Decision By The New York Times? –Business Insider

Previously: NYTimes.com Pay Wall: Media CEOs, Editors And Bloggers Weigh In

Mediabistro Course

Middle Grade Novel Writing

Middle Grade Novel WritingStarting January 15, work with a literary agent to write your middle-grade novel! In this course, you'll learn how to develop strong characters, write compelling dialogue, master the art of revision, and market your work to publishing houses and agents. Register now!

Paste Magazine Thrives Through Belt-Tightening

benpastecover2008.jpgWhile giant publishers with seemingly limitless budgets were forced to reassess their finances and even shutter publications over the last two years, a small, 8-year-old music magazine has been quietly expanding through innovative solutions to its cost problem.

Paste magazine, run by Tim Regan-Porter, Nick Purdy and Josh Jackson, offered its readers several options to help combat dwindling finances, including several different subscription package combos, fundraising and getting recording artists to release a special song for their magazine that wasn’t available elsewhere. They also started turning out a smaller product to save on costs.

Not only did it work, but Paste is on the road to being out of the red, according to publisher Purdy. And with if the magazine can find more help from an “angel,” it would “put us on sound financial footing and let us invest in things like circulation again,” he told Audience Development.

Now Paste has bulked up its content by entering into a licensing agreement with Featurewell.com, which allows Paste articles, columns, and reviews to be reprinted in other publications. Meanwhile, Paste is able to reprint content from any of Featurewell’s other clients, including TV Guide magazine, New York Observer and Reason magazine. While we’ve seen this sort of content-sharing happen with more and more frequency with Web publications (like Gawker and The Business Insider), it’s been slow to catch on with print journalism. Here’s hoping that 2010 sees other small publishers being as creative with their funding options and content as Paste.

Press release after the jump.

Read More: Back in BlackAudience Development

Previously: Paste Asks Readers, Musicians To Help Save Mag

Read more

Fiscal Times Will Have Powerhouse Of Journos, Content

jackie.jpgNow see, this is the kind of publication we hope to see more of in 2010: The Fiscal Times, set to launch next year, will be an online-only entity that “will aim to drive the conversation surrounding our nation’s most pressing economic issues.”

Sure, there are plenty of economic blogs out there right now, but there are two things that make us excited about The Fiscal Times. One is its content sharing agreement: the news org already has a deal with The Washington Post, and is working on arrangements with other publications, much in the way that The Business Insider has done. Secondly, The Fiscal Times really has culled some of the best financial reporters and editors: Ann Reilly Dowd, formerly of Fortune and Money; Elaine Povich from The Chicago Tribune and Newsday; Dan Morgan, an ex-investigative reporter for The Washington Post and Eric Pianin, a 28-year veteran of The Washington Post. What’s more, TFT’s editor-in-chief is Jackie Leo (at left), who formerly held the same position at Reader’s Digest and was editorial director of Consumer Reports.

With this group, it finally makes sense why the organizations that are sharing content would actually want to take articles from The Fiscal Times, and not the other way around.

Says one of the founders of the publication, Peter G. Peterson, “The Fiscal Times is a new entity whose time has come, an independently supported publication comprised of top journalists and opinion makers covering the critical economic issues of our time.” We might actually believe him.

Read More: Fiscal Times launching next year –Twitter

The Fiscal Times’ Twitter

Read more

WSJ.com Debuts In Japan|AOL Buyout Numbers|Observer Loses Reporter To TBI|Colbert On The Cover Of SI|The Weirdest Headlines Of 2009

The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon – Thurs 11p / 10c
Joy of Hanukkah
www.thedailyshow.com
Daily Show
Full Episodes
Political Humor Health Care Crisis

WebNewser: The Wall Street Journal debuted its Japanese-language Web site today.

Silicon Alley Insider: 1,100 AOL staffers took the buyout offered earlier this year, meaning the company will have to lay off 1,400 more people by the end of the first quarter of 2010.

Romenesko: The New York Observer‘s Gillian Reagan has left the paper to join The Business Insider.

Associated Press: Stephen Colbert is a cover model (again). He’s on the latest cover of Sports Illustrated in a form-fitting speed skating uniform.

Newsweek: Here’s a fun end of the year list: the oddest headlines of 2009.

What Titles Were You Sad To Lose In 2009?

gourmet.jpgIt hasn’t been the easiest year for print journalism. Crain’s New York Business reported Friday that 367 magazines have been axed in the last 12 months, with 64 going online-only, according to preliminary numbers from online database Mediafinder.com. (In October, Mediafinder said 383 had already closed up shop during the first nine months for the year).

According to The Business Insider, by July over 105 newspapers received similar treatment. Many more have had to scale back or go to an almost entirely digital format to survive.

In early October, Condé Nast took a particularly brutal hit with the shuttering of four titles: Gourmet, Cookie, Modern Bride, and Elegant Bride. And those closures came months after Condé folded Domino and Portfolio earlier in the year.

Still, it could have been worse…The New York Times is still around, despite some pessimistic predictions, right? So we here at FishbowlNY would like to hear from our readers: which closing affected you the most? Feel free to add your own to our list, and remember, we’re sticking to print publications (RIP Jossip.com) that disappeared in 2009, not including any that went online-only. And pass it along to your friends — we’ll be taking your answers into consideration next week, when we feature some year-end lists handpicked by the FishbowlNY editors. What can we say, it’s that time of year.


What print title will you miss the most?(trends)

Read More: 367 magazines shuttered in 2009Crain’s

Previously: Breaking: Condé Shutters Four Magazines: Cookie, Gourmet, Two Bridal Titles, Report: More Than 100 Magazines Shuttered In Last Three Months

D-Day At NYT, More Info Emerges On Buyouts

nyt logo.jpgToday is the deadline for New York Times staffers to accept or reject the buyout offers that went out in October. We’ve been keeping our ear to the ground for information about who has agreed to take the buyouts, just as last Friday executive editor Bill Keller asked staffers in a memo to reconsider the offers in order to avoid more layoffs at the company later this month. The paper has to cut about 100 staffers before the end of the year, but Keller said in the memo he was “almost certain the number [of buyouts] will fall short of the 100 we need.”

There’s already news surfacing about those who have agreed to take buyouts. Politico‘s Michael Calderone says at least five D.C. reporters will be leaving the paper, Neil Lewis, Stephen Labaton, David Johnston, David Stout and, newly reported today, Edmund Andrews.

The New York Post‘s Keith Kelly also said veteran business reporter Geraldine Fabrikant and metro reporter Ralph Blumenthal would be among those taking the buyout. Today, The Business Insider reported that Louis Uchitelle, Alex Berenson and Jonathan Glater would also be leaving the Times.

Gawker has a longer, unconfirmed list here.

Know anyone we missed? Send us an email or leave a tip in the anonymous tip box at right.

The New York Times Buyout List –Gawker

Here Are The Four New York Times Biz Reporters Taking The Buyout Deal –The Business Insider

Previously: New York Times Staff Cuts May Come As Early As Next Week

The Business Insider Continues Its Content Sharing Conquest

logo-tbi.jpgDon’t be alarmed if you start to see articles from The Atlantic‘s Megan McArdle reprinted in full on another Web site. It’s just The Business Insider again, striking another content-sharing deal like the one it has with Gawker Media, allowing the site to go all Huffington Post and reprint entire pieces from other news organizations without being slammed by copyright infringement claims (which in today’s digital market, is becoming an increasingly tricky area to corral).

We’ve heard that TBI has cut more of these content-sharing deals with smaller blogs, and that its page The Tape often features occasional outside posts from these publications, along with its regular RSS feed.

When we wrote about Business Insider’s deal with Gawker, we asked if there was any benefit to sharing complete content beyond the obvious: more content and more exposure. While we still don’t have our answer, the number of media organizations willing to jump on these deals proves that there’s something in it for them after all, even if we don’t know what.

Check it out: The Healthcare Debate Is A Kabuki Theatre Of Incoherence –The Business Insider

Previously: Gawker, The Business Insider Join Forces,

Time Inc. Cuts Hit Entertainment Weekly

ew cover new.jpgIt didn’t take long for the body count to start adding up at Time Inc. Hours after FSB folded, resulting in 11 layoffs, Entertainment Weekly reportedly started cutting staff — letting at least 11 people go.

Sources told Erin Carlson from The Business Insider that four editorial staffers and seven business-side employees got the axe today, including two from EW‘s Los Angeles office.

The entertainment pub is no stranger to cuts. Last year, EW trimmed its staff by about 15 people across the board as part of Time Inc.’s massive layoffs totaling 600.

Eleven Staffers Axed At Entertainment Weekly –The Business Insider

Earlier: Time Inc. Shutters FSB

Gawker, The Business Insider Join Forces

aol time tbi.jpg

This morning we noticed something strange: a Gawker post written by someone named The Business Insider. Some digging revealed the exact same post written by Nicholas Carlson, a former Gawker employee, on Business Insider’s Silicon Alley Insider.

Carlson confirmed to FishbowlNY that this article — which cites an anonymous source claiming AOL CEO Tim Armstrong and Time Inc. CEO Ann Moore met recently to discuss a join spin-off of Time Warner — was part of a new partnership between the two Web companies. The article’s subject matter and tone make it a perfect pick up for Gawker, and we’re told this is the first time the site has republished a Business Insider story, although TBI has been picking up Gawker pieces since last month.

Now the question remains, beyond clicks, is there any other benefit to either side in sharing content?

Related: Gawker Launches Open Forums