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Posts Tagged ‘The Economist’

Economist Bylines Blogs

the-econ222omist-logo.jpgThis week marked a big change for The Economist‘s Web site. For the first time in the paper’s 150+-year history, there were bylines of a sort attached to articles — although they will only appear on blog posts.

According to the Editor’s Note, initials of the blog writers will now appear next to their items, “to clear up any confusion about multiple correspondents in the same city.” The magazine itself will remain byline-less, since the blog “is a place for individual writers to offer brief thoughts, trial balloons, scratchings on the back of an envelope and the like, and showcases some of the diversity of thought we have on the staff. The magazine, by contrast, is what happens when we put all of our heads together, and so should be considered as carrying the full editorial weight of The Economist.”

Hey, we’d take a steady gig over a byline any day — they come cheap with all the CraigsList ads offering writers a chance to work for compensation in the form of seeing their name in print (or online).

Read More: Editor’s NoteThe Ecoomist

Economist Group Sheds Business Trade Mag

IMAGcfoE.jpgIn the days of dwindling resources for print publications, it almost seems natural to have private equity firms buy up titles.

Such is the case with yesterday’s sale of CFO Publishing to Seguin Partners. CFO, which focuses on the C-level and senior finance executives, was previously owned by The Economist Group, which will retain a minority stake in the publisher once private equity firm Seguin takes over.

In 2001, the formerly-titled Bariston Partners gained its first foothold in publishing from the parent company of The Economist by buying a majority stake in The Economist Group’s Journal of Commerce. Seguin partner Alan Glass said of the purchase:

“We are thrilled at the opportunity to work with a brand as strong as CFO…(the publisher’s) award-winning editorial content and its tremendously loyal, influential audience make it a valued resource for its readers as well as an effective marketing partner for a range of blue-chip customers.”

Press release after the jump.

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More On This Week’s BusinessWeek Layoffs

businessweek cover new.jpgTo say it’s been a rough week for BusinessWeek would be an understatement. Yesterday, the axe fell hard, and new parent Bloomberg LP has cut around 130 people for the business mag’s staff — including 60 to 70 from the edit side.

Among those getting pink slips were big names like media columnist Jon Fine, community manager Shirley Brady and tech writers Steve Wildstrom and Stephen Baker.

Business journalism blog Talking Biz News has kept a running tally of outgoing BusinessWeekers since yesterday, and today has an updated list. Blogger Chris Roush says senior writer Pete Engardio, Atlanta bureau chief Dean Foust, Philadelphia bureau chief Amy Barrett, management department editor Jena McGregor, associate editor Hardy Green, senior editor James Cooper, senior photo editor Kathy Moore and Prudence Crowther, head of the copy desk, will not be making the transition to Bloomberg’s BusinessWeek.

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How The The Atlantic Ended Up With The Same Cover As The Economist

250.jpg The Columbia Journalism Review just happened to catch some similarities between an October 2008 cover for The Economist and a May 2009 edition of The Atlantic. Besides the typeface, the pictures on the covers are almost identical: both show the shadow outline of man peering over the edge of a cliff, you know, to symbolize how much trouble our economy is in.

But it’s a total coincidence, Atlantic art director Jason Treat told CJR:

“I actually hadn’t seen the Economist cover when we designed this, so I wasn’t even aware that they had arrived at the same design solution…I only wish I had seen the Economist cover first…(I) would have revised it to distance it aesthetically.”

We believe Treat when he says it was an honest mistake: this is fundamentally different from the Newsweek/Runner’s World photo rights issue going on right now. If anything, the only thing both The Atlantic and The Economist are guilty of here is using the worn cliché to represent the financial crisis.

Everybody’s On EdgeColumbia Journalism Review

Business Journals’ Readership Up, Despite Cutbacks

fortune_20magazine_20cover.jpg

You’d never know it from the cuts across the board being made at publishers like Time Inc. and Forbes Media, but some of these companies’ titles are seeing a upswing in their readership. Lucia Moses of MediaWeek reported this week that Fortune, The Economist, Smart Money, The Wall Street Journal, Inc. and Forbes have all seen an increase in readers, ironically because of all the financial terror that has caused their publishers to make cuts in the first place.

So while audiences bemoan Rupert Murdoch‘s pay wall plans, following The Wall Street Journal model, the paper itself has seen an 11.6 percent growth in overall readership from last year. And while Fortune may be cutting as many as 40 staffers over the next several weeks as part of Time Inc.’s reduction plan and Forbes let go 100 employees just last month, the two magazines have grown to 4.1 million (9 percent increase) and 6 million (11.5 percent) in total readers, respectively. And with the current trend seeing unemployment still on the rise among executives, you can bet one place they won’t be cutting back: their subscriptions to business magazines. Maybe next year’s jump in readers will be big enough that these titles can actually hire back some of their emaciated newsroom.

Read More: Report: Business Magazines See Uptick in Readership

Previously: First on FBNY: Time Inc. Shutters Custom Pub Fortune Small Business, Forbes Layoffs Decimate Staff, Time Inc. Closes Door on Buyouts Today, WSJ Looks To Claim Title Of Number One Paper In Circulation

Reader’s Digest Moves To NYC As Part of Restructuring Plan

rdjjjjj.jpgAfter filing for Chapter 11 this August, Reader’s Digest Association has been working on a restructuring plan to get itself out of debt. Some of this has been the unfortunate (but par for course) shuttering of titles, like Rick Warren‘s ill-fated The Purpose Driven Connection magazine.

Yesterday, editor-in-chief Peggy Northrop mentioned at the ASME luncheon that the Reader’s Digest brand would never again launch a magazine that wasn’t able to perform across different media platforms. And today, RDA continues its attempts to get back in the black, and no it doesn’t involve firing staffers. It looks like the company will be moving its staffers from its offices in Pleasantville, N.Y.

As Keith Kelly reported this morning:

“Some of the 600 employees based in [Pleasantville] will be relocated to White Plains, N.Y. But executive offices and Reader’s Digest magazine’s editorial will move to space at 750 Third Avenue that was recently vacated by S.I. Newhouse’s Condé Nast Publications.

So some editorial staffers will be going to White Plains while the corporate headquarters and other editorial staffers move to NYC to share in the same building as Condé Nast. (FishbowlNY previously reported that The Economist is also moving into that building in the second quarter of next year.) While it’s always terrible to have to pick up your life and move elsewhere for a job, relocating to New York isn’t the worst thing to happen to a magazine staff in the last, oh say, 24 hours. In terms of restructuring, this is one of the more positive moves we’ve seen in awhile, which it should be obvious by the very un-restructuring phrase in CEO Mary Berner‘s letter to the staffers, “Some of you will be excited by this change…”

Berner’s full memo to RDA staffers after the jump.

Previously: Reader’s Digest Files For Ch. 11

Read More: Reader’s Digest moving to NYCNew York Post

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Viacom Earnings|Travel Channel|Ascend Media Liquidates|Bloomberg’s BusinessWeek Plans|WebMediaBrands CEO Meckler

Wall Street Journal: Viacom, parent company of MTV Networks, reported its third quarter earnings today. Profit grew 15 percent due to cost-cutting, perhaps related to this summer’s layoffs at MTV?

New York Times: Scripps is reportedly close to closing its deal to buy the Travel Channel from Cox Communications.

Folio: B-to-b publisher Ascend Media has filed for Chapter 7 liquidation.

MediaWeek: Bloomberg unveils its plans for BusinessWeek: make it look more like The Economist and offer content for free “while creating deep, vertical content areas that paying users could access for roughly $100 a year.”

Business Insider: Alan Meckler, the CEO of mediabistro.com’s parent company WebMediaBrands, talks about plans to buy new blogs, and his plans for Mediabistro and Semantic Web.

Bastiat Prize for Journalism Awarded to John Hasnas

basss.jpgLast month we posted some of the finalists for the Bastiat Prize for Journalism, awarded by London think tank The International Policy Network. This year was notable in that, for the first time, the award included a category for online journalists.

Earlier this week, the prize went to Georgetown professor John Hasnas for his Wall Street Journal op-ed “The ‘Unseen’ Deserve Empathy, Too.” The editorial questioned Barack Obama‘s appointment of Sonia Sotomayor to the U.S. Supreme Court based on her reputation as empathetic and understanding, which Hasnas argued was antithetical to the qualities that make a good judge.

Second place was awarded to Robert Guest, Washington correspondent for The Economist, and third went to Robert Robb of the Arizona Republic.

Full press release after the jump

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Economist NY Bureau Chief Bishop Guest Edits Philathropy Mag

alliance.jpgThe Economist‘s New York bureau chief Matthew Bishop, has contributed as guest editor to upcoming September issue of Alliance magazine, a publication about philanthropy and social investment around the world.

Bishop, who also co-wrote the book Philanthrocapitalism with Michael Green, used his platform in Alliance to discuss the challenges that have faced philanthropic organizations since the beginning of the global financial crisis.

In the issue, Bishop wrote an essay based on his book and the changes he has seen in the year since its debut:

“Launching our book, Philanthrocapitalism, just days after the collapse of Lehman Brothers made clear in no uncertain terms to Michael Green and myself that the world had fundamentally changed. For many in the mainstream media, the idea that there was any positive role for the wealthy in solving social problems had been made moot by the collapse of the world’s wealth creation machine and the return of activist big government. Our critics in the non-profit world had great fun with our notion that the sector could become much more efficient by learning from capitalism — a one reviewer wittily described as ‘Lehman Brothers to the rescue.’ Ouch.

Clearly, we underestimated the extent to which the short-termism of for-profit capitalism made it vulnerable to systemic meltdown. Yet, paradoxically…this actually reinforced an underlying theme of the book that we had not made as explicit as we might have done, that the old barriers between sectors are collapsing, creating huge opportunity for everyone to learn from each other.”

Also in the issue, Bishop interviewed Sonal Shah, who leads the new White House Office of Social Innovation and Civic Participation, who was recruited from Google.org to lead President Barack Obama‘s new office.

Read all of Bishop’s essay here.

London Think Tank IPN Announces Journalism Prize Finalists

bastiat.jpgThe International Policy Network is a think tank based in London whose mission is promote free market solutions to our social ailments. Since 2002, IPN has been doling out the Bastiat Prize for Journalism and they’ve just announced this year’s finalists. And, for the first time this year, IPN had created a new category for online journalists.

The journalists up for the award this year all hail from print media, including Matthew Kaminski of The Wall Street Journal and The Economist‘s Robert Guest. There are three finalists up for the online award: Shikha Dalmia of the Reason Foundation, for her Forbes.com column, Daniel Hannan, U.K. Member of European Parliament and Rohan Samarajiva, for columns written on LankaBusinessOnline.

The award itself is named after Frédéric Bastiat who was, for those of you in need a refresher on 19th century French politics, a philosopher who used satire to explain complex economic principles to the masses. Former winners include former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and economist Milton Friedman. PJ O’Rourke, the conservative humorist and Rolling Stone writer, will bring the star power to this year’s awards dinner, which will take place on October 26 in New York.

Winners of the Bastiat Prize will receive $10,000 and winners on the online prize will get $3,000. Both winners will also be awarded a set of engraved crystal candlesticks, which is a reference to Bastiat’s famous satirical political essay, “A Petition,” IPN said.

A full list of the finalists after the jump

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