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Posts Tagged ‘The Los Angeles Times’

Last Minute Gift Ideas|Rushfield Leaves Gawker|Another List For 2009|Thoughts On Leaving NYT, Set To Verse

TVNewser: Last minute TV news-related Christmas gift ideas.

The Wrap: Four months after leaving The Los Angeles Times for Gawker, Richard Rushfield has left the blog to join the start-up Digital Entertainment Corporation of America.

Mediaite: What do Arianna Huffington, Roger Ailes and the cast of “The Jersey Shore” all have in common? They’re all among Mediaite.com‘s list of 50 innovators and influencers of 2009.

Tinakelleypoetry’s Blog: Thoughts on leaving The New York Times in verse

Sony’s E-Reader Poaches Kindle’s Publications

rede.jpg The war of the e-readers has already begun, and electronic companies are already gearing up for battle. While Amazon broke out as an early forerunner, threatening to turn all other devices into the Zune knockoffs to the Kindle’s iPod, Sony has a couple weapons in its own arsenal. They’ve managed to score an exclusive deal with News Corp. for a specialized version of The New York Post and MarketWatch.com. Now comes the news that 19 other publications — most of which were previously only available on Kindle — have struck partnerships with Sony’s e-reader as well, including The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, and the Christian Science Monitor. Even better for Sony, papers like The New York Observer, which don’t have deals with Amazon, have decided to sign on with Sony.

While these partnerships can only create increasing competition between the brands, it will come as a boon to consumers who will now have their pick of devices without the fear of losing content over their choice. With non-exclusive partnerships dominating the market, it will be up the electronic manufacturers to create the most user-friendly device in order to gain customers. Let the best e-reader win!

Read More: Sony ties deals with 19 content partnersFinancial Times

Previously: News Corp. Pairs With Sony To Debut Digital New York Post

Saying Goodbye To E&P

epOct09.jpgIn an article charting the demise of newspaper industry trade pub Editor & Publisher, The Los Angeles Times blames Web sites like mediabistro.com:

“Online journalism news aggregators such as Romenesko regularly relied on stories by E&P, linking to them for reporting on a new study or analysis of anything relating to the newspaper industry.

But Romenesko and other free sites such as Mediabistro.com also snatched readers and job listings that might have landed in E&P‘s classified section.”

Yes, classified revenues have left print behind for the Internet and everybody wants to read content like that of E&P‘s for free on the Web. But there was nothing stopping its owner Nielsen Co. from selling off the pub to a company that would have kept it alive — even if only as digital version of itself.

We’re sad to see another publication (and its Nielsen-owned sister Kirkus Reviews) close its doors in 2009. We’ll also miss all the scoops and insightful news about our industry. Too bad Nielsen didn’t take WebMediaBrands’ offer to buy E&P earlier this year. We would have welcomed them to the family!

But as the title heads towards closure at the end of the year, various good-byes are sprinkling out from staffers. After the jump, parting words from senior editor Joe Strupp and former cartoonist Steve Greenberg.

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New York Times Launches Local Chicago Edition Today

the_new_york_times_logo-thumb-200x29-4502.pngToday saw the premiere issue of the much-discussed Chicago edition of The New York Times. The Times has been encroaching on regional news since it started Bay Area coverage last month, and the launch in Chicago is further indication that Arthur Sulzberger and company are betting the future of journalism is in hyper-local coverage.

But it’s not just the outreach to other cities that has competing publications worried: The Tribune Company, which owns The Chicago Tribune and The Los Angeles Times, lost several of its editors to the newly-formed Chicago News Cooperative, the organization now providing content for the Chicago edition of the Times. The co-op will be providing two additional pages of Chicago-based coverage for the Times twice a week, which will be added to the paper for the region.

Meanwhile, The Wall Street Journal launched their own San Francisco edition earlier this month, proving one again: If you bill it, they will come.

Read More: The Times to Begin Chicago Edition on FridayNew York Times

Previously: More Tribune Employees Join Chicago News Cooperative, Tribune Employees To Create Content For NYT In Chicago

Former Portfolio Editor To Lead Observer

observer.jpgFormer Portfolio top editor Kyle Pope has been picked to take over the reins of The New York Observer from interim editor Tom McGeveran, owner Jared Kushner announced yesterday.

The announcement comes just a week after McGeveran announced that he would be stepping down from his post at the paper, which he as held since longtime editor Peter Kaplan left the pub in May. Pope will be starting at The Observer on Monday, and will work side-by-side with McGeveren for a few weeks to ensure a smooth transition. The December 9 issue will be Pope’s first as editor.

Pope most recently worked as one of two top editors at Condé Nast‘s business glossy until it folded earlier this year. He started his career at The Wall Street Journal, where he won a Pulitzer Prize as part of the paper’s team covering September 11. Pope has also worked as a freelance contributor for The Los Angeles Times and The New York Times.

Kyle Pope Is The New Editor Of The ObserverThe New York Observer

Earlier: Observer Loses Another Editor

Why “Self-Destructive” LA Times Writer Is Better Suited For Gawker

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Richard Rushfield (center) Photo via FishbowlLA

Richard Rushfield is one of the few West Coasters that are still kept on Gawker‘s payroll. Hell, even Gabriel Snyder had to move back to New York to take the job as managing editor of the online publication. And if that doesn’t make him an outlier enough, Rushfield actually quit The Los Angeles Times (and no, that’s not code for “got fired by Sam Zell” or “took a buyout package”) to take on the role of a full-time blogger. Now he has a book out called Don’t Follow Me, I’m Lost, about what some would call was his counter-intuitive switch from mainstream to digital media.

Our colleagues over at FishbowlLA had a chance to sit down with Rushfield and pin him down on why he left an editor’s job to work at a blog. From their interview, we’ve hypothesized three theories on what makes Rushfield so well suited for the blogosphere.

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Tribune Employees Lose What Little Stake They Had Left In Company

tribune logo.jpgNo big shocker here: Sam Zell‘s bankruptcy of the Tribune Company is going to end up costing its employees more than just their jobs or perks, it’s also going to retroactively remove their stock ownership in the company.

To be fair, employees will still receive their first share allocations of ESOP, a program that gives employees options in their company. But as The Los Angeles Times noted, “those allocations won’t be worth the paper they’re printed on because of the bankruptcy.” And the Times should know: They are one of the papers owned by the ill-fated Tribune Co., along with The Chicago Tribune.

So, when the company went bankrupt, employees received shares, but now that the banks have bought out Zell, the stock (no pun intended) that the staffers put into their publication is no longer an option.

Read more: Tribune to end employee stock ownership plan

Earlier: Tribune Co. Files for Bankruptcy, Tales of the Tribune Co.: It’s All Gone Straight to Zell

Condé Nast Traveler Shows Travel Industry How To Save The World

world savers.jpgToday, we spent some time at Condé Nast Traveler‘s World Savers Congress, a conference that gathered members of the tourism and travel industries that are trying to make a difference in the world through conservation, sustainability and other philanthropic efforts, along with other companies and philanthropists that share their vision and goals.

We were drawn to the conference by special guest speakers Mandy Moore, Wyclef Jean and Edward Norton — all inspiring philanthropists and world travelers — but there were some media personalities there as well. CNT‘s editor-in-chief Klara Glowczewska opened the event by welcoming everyone and served as master of ceremonies throughout. “We’re at the dawn of a new era,” she said “Business will be transformed, and ultimately in the best possible ways.”

New York Times columnist and author Nicholas Kristof moderated the first panel of the day, featuring TOMS Shoes CEO Blake Mycoskie and Rachel Webber, the director of energy initiatives for Rupert Murdoch‘s News Corp. Although News Corp.’s energy initiatives grew out of the desire to streamline their business expenses, they now realize that folding socially conscious initiatives into their business model can improve the brand’s reputation around the world, Webber said.

Later, documentarian Ken Burns previewed his latest project, “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea”. You can check out a clip here.

Then, over lunch we sat at the bloggers’ table with CNT bloggers Julia Bainbridge, Mollie Chen and Wendy Perrin, Jen Leo of The Los Angeles Times and bloggers Todd Lucier, Aimee Barnes and Elliott Ng (who snapped some great photos of the event).

bloggers.jpg

After lunch, Norton spoke to the crowd about his travels and various philanthropic works. He spoke at length about the Maasai Wilderness Conservation Trust in Eastern Africa, where he serves as president of the board. Norton says he primarily helps the trust raise money that is then invested back into conservation, education and health care programs in the Maasai community. Right now, the New York resident is training to run the New York Marathon on November 1 with three Maasai warriors. All the funds raised in support of his run will go back to the Maasai, he said. Come marathon day, we’ll be keeping an eye out for Norton and his Maasai running buddies.

Overall, all the talk about sustainability and conservation and saving the world got us thinking: what can we do to give back? Give us some ideas. What are some ways you give back to the community and help the world at large?

After the jump, more photos of the day’s event

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Slate Founder Michael Kinsley To Lead New Digital Launch For Atlantic

Atlantic Consumer Media, which publishes The Atlantic, has brought on Slate founder Michael Kinsley as a media columnist and the editor of an upcoming digital property that will launch early next year.

“As both an editor and a columnist, Michael has long been at the vanguard of publishing’s digital transformation,” said Atlantic Consumer Media President Justin B. Smith. “We are thrilled to welcome him and his considerable talents to the Atlantic Media family.”

A well-known media figure, Kinsley has been an editor at The New Republic and Harper’s and edited the opinion pages at The Los Angeles Times. He has also previously written regular columns for The Washington Post and Time magazine.

Atlantic Media didn’t provide any more detail about the upcoming digital project, but we’ll let you know if we find out any more details. The New York Times points out that Atlantic Media is also currently building Atlantic Wire, “a real-time sampling of opinion and commentary.”

Ex-NYT Execs Launch Marketing & Ad Company

larosa.png Two former ad executives from The New York Times have joined forces to launch a marketing and advertising sales rep company with an international focus. But they’re not just throwing around their former employer’s name just to get publicity for their growing company — the Times is also one of their first clients.

Founders Claire LaRosa (left) and Warren Ho said their company, Media Sales International, will initially focus on Latin America before expanding into other foreign markets. The company will be producing special advertising economic reports for the Times‘ digital and print editions.

ho.pngLaRosa worked at the Times for 31 years in various ad sales management positions. Ho worked alongside LaRosa for 10 years selling advertising for the Times, and he has also worked for Conde Nast Traveler and The Los Angeles Times.

“We have the expertise to help clients outside the United States target and reach key audiences, such as leaders in business and government in the States,” LaRosa said. “The New York Times and nytimes.com provide extremely effective venues for reaching influential, decision-maker audiences. And the net combined audience of more than 20 million is a powerful story and offer.”

(Photo via Media Sales International)

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